Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am wondering weather this is a legal or not

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    int &i=*(new int(8) );
    cout<<i<<endl;
    delete &i;
    return 0;
} 

That a reference variable is referencing a dynamically allocating memory and then we can de-allocate the memory using delete. Is this variable "i" and be reused again or what if we try to assign some value to "i".

i=6;

After de-allocating the memory.

share|improve this question
1  
Yes this is legal. No you cannot reuse the variable again: a reference can only be bound once. –  Igor Tandetnik Aug 29 '13 at 4:04
    
99.9999% of the theoretically legal programs in C++ are bad style. This is no exception. –  MSalters Aug 29 '13 at 9:46

3 Answers 3

i=6;

You can't use i any more because its memory is released. This is simliar to the dangling pointer case where the pointer itself is pointing to the memory not owned by it.

share|improve this answer

A reference is an alias to an object. After initialization it behaves exactly as if it was the name of the referenced object. In this particular case the reference is giving a name to the object that was dynamically allocated.

The code as shown is correct and guaranteed, although I'd recommend against it. After deleting the object by means of taking the address of it through the reference, you end up with a dangling reference, that is, a name that refers to a dead object, and deallocated memory. Any operation applied to i after the delete is bound to cause undefined behavior.

share|improve this answer

include

using std::cout;

using std::endl;

int main()

{

  int *p=new int(8);

  //p points int(8)

  cout<<"*p="<<*p<<endl;

  delete p;


  //p points null

  int i = 10;

  //p points i

  p = &i;

  cout<<"*p="<<*p<<endl;

  return 0;

}

share|improve this answer
2  
This has nothing to do with the question that was asked. –  Yuushi Aug 29 '13 at 4:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.