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Problem-relevant part of the assignment: "Your task is to complete the program. ...In addition you should write Drill class which also derives from Tool class. Drill class has two attributes: model and the maximum rpm of the drill. Both classes must implement printInfo method which is used to print the tool information as shown in the example print."

So, I need to get the price (1.75)m weight (175), model "Black&Decker A" and rpm (1350) to the two drill-objects created from class Drill, which is a subclass of the superclass Tool. However, weight and price are private attributes in the superclass, so I can't have them used by my subclass. I can, of course, without difficulty use and print the model and rpm values.

Can anyone point me to right direction here? I'm not asking you to do my assignment. I've been stuck for 16 hours or so. I've tried overriding the return-methods of Tool class to no avail. I can only edit the subclass Drill in this assignment.

Here's a truncated version of the relevant code and what I've written so far to the Drill class: ("..." refers to a truncation of the code)

Test Class

public class TestClass {
  public static void main(String args[]) {
    ...

    Tool drill1, drill2    

    drill1 = new Drill(1.75, 175, "Black&Decker A", 1350);

    drill2 = new Drill(2, 250, "Black&Decker B", 3000);
    ...
    ((Drill)drill1).printInfo();

    System.out.println();

    ((Drill)drill2).printInfo();
    ...
  }
}

Tool Class

abstract class Tool {
  private double weight;     // These guys
  private int price;         // Causing all the trouble here

  public Tool(double p, int h) {

    weight = p;
    price = h; 
  }

  public double ReturnWeight() {

    return weight;
  }


  public int ReturnPrice() {

    return price;
  }

  public abstract void printInfo();
} 

Drill Class

class Drill extends Tool {

  double weight;
  int price;        
  String model;
  int rpm;      


  Drill (double y, int u, String i, int j) {
    super(weight,price);    // Have to do this because of the Tool class

    weight = y          
    price = u;
    model = i;
    rpm = j;
  }

  //my pitiful attempts at overriding. Not even sure what to do here ***

  public double ReturnWeight() {

    return weight;
  }

  public int ReturnPrice() {

    return price;
  }

  public void printInfo() {
    System.out.println("Weight: " + weight);
    System.out.println("Price: " + price);
    System.out.println("Model: " + model);
    System.out.println("Revolution speed: " + rpm); 
  }
}

An example print should be as follows:

Weight: 1.75 kg

Price: 175 euros

Model: Black&Decker A

Revolution speed: 1350


Weight: 2.0 kg

Price: 250 euros

Model: Black&Decker B

Revolution speed: 3000

So far I only manage to get the Model and Revolution speed correct.

share|improve this question
    
In your TestClass, define drill1 and drill2 as Drill objects not Tools. That saves you from having to cast the objects. –  Duncan Aug 29 '13 at 6:29
1  
@DuncanJones: Given that Tool declares printInfo, there's no need to cast them anyway... –  Jon Skeet Aug 29 '13 at 7:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Considering you're only allowed to change Drill:

class Drill extends Tool {
    String model;
    int rpm;    

      Drill (double weight, int price, String model, int rpm) {
        super(weight,price); 

        this.model = model;
        this.rpm = rpm;
      }

      public void printInfo() {
        System.out.println("Weight: " + ReturnWeight());
        System.out.println("Price: " + ReturnPrice());
        System.out.println("Model: " + model);
        System.out.println("Revolution speed: " + rpm); 
      }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
That's it! Of course! Thank you, Sambuca! I didn't even remember that I can print methods like that. Lesson learned here. I guess I should read a few chapters again from the Java book. (+1 and all that stuff.) –  Steve Waters Aug 29 '13 at 6:42
2  
@SteveWaters: You're not printing the methods. You're calling the methods, and printing the result. It's important to understand the difference. –  Jon Skeet Aug 29 '13 at 7:10

There's no indication that you need to override ReturnWeight and ReturnPrice (which are very unconventional method names in Java; usually they'd be getWeight and getPrice). You just need to call the existing implementations from your printInfo method. It's not clear whether you wrote the Tool class yourself or whether it's been provided for you - if it's part of the assignment, then I'd be concerned in terms of the naming, to be honest. If you wrote it yourself, then presumably you can rename those methods yourself.

Additionally, you shouldn't have height and weight fields in your subclass - the point is that the superclass already has that information.

You should also revisit your constructor:

Drill (double y, int u, String i, int j)

You need to pass the values of y and u to the superclass constructor, assuming that they're meant to be the weight and price respectively. Your next step should be to rename all your parameters so that they're meaningful. (Likewise the parameters in the Tool class constructor should be renamed.)

Additionally, I'd advise you to make the model and rpm fields private - and ideally make all the fields in both classes final. (Immutable types are easier to reason about.)

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with the renaming comment. It's quite common to give the parameters the same names as the fields and use e.g. this.price = price; in the constructor body. –  Duncan Aug 29 '13 at 6:24
    
Thanks, but as I mentioned. I'm only allowed to edit the Drill class in this assignment. So the main class and the Tool class as well are provided and yes I agree they have done a bad job naming those two methods. Thank you for the advice. –  Steve Waters Aug 29 '13 at 6:33
1  
@SteveWaters: Right - which leaves the other advice of just calling ReturnWeight and ReturnHeight, and removing the height and weight fields from Drill. I would strongly advise you to give feedback about the naming though - it's awful if you're being given bad names in example code. –  Jon Skeet Aug 29 '13 at 7:09
    
Yes, I'll meet the teacher on monday and will mention this. Future students will be spared from bad naming policies, at least on this occasion. –  Steve Waters Aug 29 '13 at 8:14

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