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In the reference document: http://docs.python.org/2/library/functions.html#type It showed how to define a member variable X = type('X', (object,), dict(a=1))

But how to define a member function, so the class can equivalent to:

class X(object):
    a = 1
    def get_a(self):
        return self.a

This question is originated by adding iterable feature to a given custom enum type. In my project, there is an old custom enum type here:

def enum(*sequential, **named):
    """ Contruct an enum """
    enums = dict(zip(sequential, range(len(sequential))), **named)
    reverse = dict((value, key) for key, value in enums.items())
    enums['reverse_mapping'] = reverse
    return type('Enum', (), enums)

It can be used like:

MY_COLORS = enum(RED=0,BLUE=1)

But enums defined by this method cannot be used as iterable object in 'for in' statement. I hope to add a member function to return keys, values and items of the enums. Then I can do something like this:

[item for item in MY_COLORS.keys()]

Answer for python3:

def enum(*sequential, **named):
    """ Contruct an enum """
    enums = dict(zip(sequential, range(len(sequential))), **named)
    reverse = dict((value, key) for key, value in enums.items())
    key_names = list(enums.keys())
    enums['reverse_mapping'] = reverse        
    @classmethod
    def keys(klass):
        return key_names 
    enums['keys'] = keys
    return type('Enum', (), enums)
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this: (tested in Python 2.7)

def enum(*sequential, **named):
    """ Contruct an enum """
    enums = dict(zip(sequential, range(len(sequential))), **named)
    reverse = dict((value, key) for key, value in enums.items())
    key_names = enums.keys()
    enums['reverse_mapping'] = reverse        
    @classmethod
    def keys(klass):
       return key_names 
    enums['keys'] = keys
    return type('Enum', (), enums)

You want to add a classmethod to the enums dict. That is what the @classmethod decorator does.

Running this does:

>>> MY_COLORS = enum(RED=0, BLUE=1)
>>> MY_COLORS.keys()
['BLUE', 'RED']

If you want to be able to iterate over MY_COLORS itself, you need to add a metaclass as in this question: Python: Is it possible to make a class iterable using the standard syntax?

share|improve this answer
    
I tested it, the actual result I got is dict_keys(['BLUE', 'keys', 'reverse_mapping', 'RED']) How can I get rid of keys and reverse_mapping, which beat the enum's original requirement? –  Rob L Aug 29 '13 at 8:01
    
ah. stupid me... fixed that for you... –  Daren Thomas Aug 29 '13 at 8:02
    
you didn't change the code, did you? The code you post won't print ['BLUE', 'RED']. However, I found to use named.keys() instead of enums.keys() at line 5 can fix it, but I still don't understand why enums.keys() not working here... –  Rob L Aug 29 '13 at 10:22
    
i did change the code, but only slightly: i moved the line key_names = enums.keys() up, so that i capture the names before we add reverse_mapping and keys. so yes, it does work now. source: ran it in the interpreter to check... –  Daren Thomas Aug 29 '13 at 11:31
    
problem with using named.keys() is that the sequential parts won't be added... –  Daren Thomas Aug 29 '13 at 11:32

A similar but shorter approch of @Eugeny Loy idea would be with a lambda:

>>> X = type('X', (object,), dict(a=1, get_a=lambda self: self.a))
>>> x = X()
>>> x.a
1
>>> x.get_a()
1
share|improve this answer

To make your class an iterable class you need to give it a next() method - It is a very good idea to give to base your class on object as well - you can then use it as you are suggesting.

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1  
Or just implement iter –  GoingTharn Aug 29 '13 at 15:52

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