Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When the code flow is like this:

if(check())
{
  ...
  ...
  if(check())
  {
    ...
    ...
    if(check())
    {
      ...
      ...
    }
  }
}

I have generally seen this work around to avoid the above messy code flow:

do {
    if(!check()) break;
    ...
    ...
    if(!check()) break;
    ...
    ...
    if(!check()) break;
    ...
    ...
} while(0);

What are some better ways that avoid this work-around/hack so that it becomes a higher-level (industry level) code?

Any suggestions which are out of the box are welcome!

share|improve this question
36  
RAII and throw exceptions. –  ta.speot.is Aug 29 '13 at 9:50
120  
To me, this sounds like a good time to use goto - but I'm sure someone will mark me down for suggesting that, so I'm not writing an answer to that effect. To have a LONG do ... while(0); seems like the wrong thing. –  Mats Petersson Aug 29 '13 at 9:53
38  
@dasblinkenlight: Yes, indeed. If you are going to use goto, be honest about it and do it in the open, don't hide it by using break and do ... while –  Mats Petersson Aug 29 '13 at 9:56
40  
@MatsPetersson: Make it an answer, I will give you +1 for your goto rehabilitation effort. :) –  Václav Zeman Aug 29 '13 at 9:56
23  
@ta.speot.is: "RAII and throw exceptions". By doing that, you'll be emulating flow control with exceptions. I.e. it is kinda like using expensive, bleeding edge hardware as a hammer or a paperweight. You can do that, but that definitely looks like a very bad taste for me. –  SigTerm Aug 29 '13 at 11:56
show 34 more comments

25 Answers

It is considered acceptable practice to isolate these decisions in a function and use returns instead of breaks. While all these checks correspond to the same level of abstraction as of the function, it is quite logical approach.

For example:

void func(output_parameters, input_parameters)
{
   if (!condition)
   {
      return;
   }
   ... 
   ...
   if (other condition)
   {
      return;
   }
   ...
   if (!another condition)
   {
      return;
   }
   ... 
   if (!yet another condition)
   {
      return;
   }
   ... 
   .... 
   if (...)
         ...    // No need to use return here. 

}

void func_and_finish(){
   setup of lots of stuff
   ...
   func(stuff_needed_in_finish, stuff_needed_in_func)
   finish up
}
share|improve this answer
21  
@MatsPetersson: "Isolate in function" means refactoring into a new function which does only the tests. –  MSalters Aug 29 '13 at 10:12
33  
+1. This is also a good answer. In C++11, the isolated function can be a lambda, as it can also capture the local variables, so makes things easy! –  Nawaz Aug 29 '13 at 10:18
10  
+1: 100 times better solution. –  deworde Aug 29 '13 at 15:51
19  
@Damon if anything, return is cleaner because any reader is immediately aware that it works correctly and what it does. With goto you have to look around to see what it is for, and to be sure that no mistakes were made. The disguising is the benefit. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 29 '13 at 16:29
10  
@SigTerm: Sometimes code should be moved to a separate function just to keep the size of each function down to an easy-to-reason-about size. If you don't want to pay for a function call, mark it forceinline. –  Ben Voigt Aug 30 '13 at 3:49
show 15 more comments

There are times when using goto is actually the RIGHT answer - at least to those who are not brought up in the religious belief that "goto can never be the answer, no matter what the question is" - and this is one of those cases.

This code is using the hack of do { ... } while(0); for the sole purpose of dressing up a goto as a break. If you are going to use goto, then be open about it. It's no point in making the code HARDER to read.

A particular situation is just when you have a lot of code with quite complex conditions:

void func()
{
   setup of lots of stuff
   ...
   if (condition)
   {
      ... 
      ...
      if (!other condition)
      {
          ...
          if (another condition)
          {
              ... 
              if (yet another condition)
              {
                  ...
                  if (...)
                     ... 
              }
          }
      }
  .... 

  }
  finish up. 
}

It can actually make it CLEARER that the code is correct by not having such a complex logic.

void func()
{
   setup of lots of stuff
   ...
   if (!condition)
   {
      goto finish;
   }
   ... 
   ...
   if (other condition)
   {
      goto finish;
   }
   ...
   if (!another condition)
   {
      goto finish;
   }
   ... 
   if (!yet another condition)
   {
      goto finish;
   }
   ... 
   .... 
   if (...)
         ...    // No need to use goto here. 
 finish:
   finish up. 
}

Edit: To clarify, I'm by no means proposing the use of goto as a general solution. But there are cases where goto is a better solution than other solutions.

Imagine for example that we are collecting some data, and the different conditions being tested for are some sort of "this is the end of the data being collected" - which depends on some sort of "continue/end" markers that vary depending on where you are in the data stream.

Now, when we're done, we need to save the data to a file.

And yes, there are often other solutions that can provide a reasonable solution, but not always.

share|improve this answer
72  
Disagree. goto may have a place, but goto cleanup does not. Cleanup is done with RAII. –  MSalters Aug 29 '13 at 10:13
14  
@MSalters: That assumes that the cleanup involves something that can be solved with RAII. Maybe I should have said "issue error" or some such instead. –  Mats Petersson Aug 29 '13 at 10:15
24  
So, keep getting downvotes on this one, presumably from those of the religious belief of goto is never the right answer. I'd appreciate if there was a comment... –  Mats Petersson Aug 29 '13 at 11:00
15  
people hate goto because you have to think to use it / to understand a program that uses it... Microprocessors, on the other hand, are built on jumps and conditional jumps... so the problem is with some people, not with logic or something else. –  woliveirajr Aug 29 '13 at 11:34
15  
+1 for appropriate use of goto. RAII is not the correct solution if errors are expected (not exceptional), as that would be an abuse of exceptions. –  Joe Aug 29 '13 at 12:08
show 47 more comments

You can use a simple continuation pattern with a bool variable:

bool goOn;
if ((goOn = check0())) {
    ...
}
if (goOn && (goOn = check1())) {
    ...
}
if (goOn && (goOn = check2())) {
    ...
}
if (goOn && (goOn = check3())) {
    ...
}

This chain of execution will stop as soon as checkN returns a false. No further check...() calls would be performed due to short-circuiting of the && operator. Moreover, optimizing compilers are smart enough to recognize that setting goOn to false is a one-way street, and insert the missing goto end for you. As the result, the performance of the code above would be identical to that of a do/while(0), only without a painful blow to its readability.

share|improve this answer
27  
Assignments inside if conditions look very suspicious. –  Mikhail Aug 29 '13 at 10:56
86  
@Mikhail Only to an untrained eye. –  dasblinkenlight Aug 29 '13 at 11:03
20  
I've used this technique before and it always kind of bugged me that I figured the compiler would have to generate code to check at each if no matter what goOn was even if an early one failed (as opposed to jumping/breaking out)... but I just ran a test and VS2012 at least was smart enough to short-circuit everything after the first false anyway. I'll be using this more often. note: if you use goOn &= checkN() then checkN() will always run even if goOn was false at the start of the if (i.e., don't do that). –  mark Aug 29 '13 at 12:15
9  
@Nawaz: If you have an untrained mind making arbitrary changes all over a code base, you have a much bigger problem than just assignments inside ifs. –  Idelic Aug 29 '13 at 16:58
6  
@sisharp Elegance is so in the eye of the beholder! I fail to understand how in the world a misuse of a looping construct could somehow be perceived as "elegant", but perhaps that's just me. –  dasblinkenlight Aug 29 '13 at 21:27
show 15 more comments
  1. Try to extract the code into a separate function (or perhaps more than one). Then return from the function if the check fails.

  2. If it's too tightly coupled with the surrounding code to do that, and you can't find a way to reduce the coupling, look at the code after this block. Presumably, it cleans up some resources used by the function. Try to manage these resources using an RAII object; then replace each dodgy break with return (or throw, if that's more appropriate) and let the object's destructor clean up for you.

  3. If the program flow is (necessarily) so squiggly that you really need a goto, then use that rather than giving it a weird disguise.

  4. If you have coding rules that blindly forbid goto, and you really can't simplify the program flow, then you'll probably have to disguise it with your do hack.

share|improve this answer
4  
I humbly submit that RAII, while useful, is not a silver bullet. When you find yourself about to write a convert-goto-to-RAII class that has no other use, I definitely think you'd be better served just using the "goto-end-of-the-world" idiom people mentioned already. –  busy_wait Aug 29 '13 at 11:55
1  
@busy_wait: Indeed, RAII can't solve everything; that's why my answer doesn't stop with the second point, but goes on to suggest goto if that's really a better option. –  Mike Seymour Aug 29 '13 at 11:58
3  
I agree, but I think it's a bad idea to write goto-RAII conversion classes and I think it should be stated explicitly. –  busy_wait Aug 29 '13 at 12:07
add comment

tl;dr: RAII, transactional code (only set results or return stuff when it is already computed) and exceptions.

Long answer:

In C, the best practice for this kind of code is to add an EXIT/CLEANUP/other label in the code, where cleanup of local resources happens and an error code (if any) is returned. This is best practice because it splits code naturally into initialization, computation, commit and return:

error_code_type c_to_refactor(result_type *r)
{
    error_code_type result = error_ok; //error_code_type/error_ok defd. elsewhere
    some_resource r1, r2; // , ...;
    if(error_ok != (result = computation1(&r1))) // allocates local resources
        goto cleanup;
    if(error_ok != (result = computation2(&r2))) // allocates local resources
        goto cleanup;
    // ...

    // commit code: all operations succeeded
    *r = computed_value_n;
cleanup:
    free_resource1(r1);
    free_resource2(r2);
    return result;
}

In C, in most code bases, the if(error_ok != ... and goto code is usually hidden behind some convenience macros (RET(computation_result), ENSURE_SUCCESS(computation_result, return_code), etc).

C++ offers extra tools over C:

  • the cleanup block functionality can be implemented as RAII, meaning you no longer need the entire cleanup block and enabling client code to add early return statements.

  • you throw whenever you cannot continue, transforming all the if(error_ok != ... into straight-forward calls.

Equivalent C++ code:

result_type cpp_code()
{
    raii_resource1 r1 = computation1();
    raii_resource2 r2 = computation2();
    // ... 
    return computed_value_n;
}

This is best practice because:

  • it is explicit (i.e. while error handling is not explicit, the main flow of the algorithm is)

  • it is straightforward to write client code

  • it is minimal

  • it is simple

  • it has no repetitive code constructs

  • it uses no macros

  • it doesn't use weird do { ... } while(0) constructs

  • it is reusable with minimal effort (i.e. if I want to copy the call to computation2(); to a different function, I don't have to make sure I add a do { ... } while(0) in the new code, nor #define a goto wrapper macro and a cleanup label, nor anything else).

share|improve this answer
    
+1. This is what I try to use, using RAII or something. shared_ptr with a custom deleter can do a lot of stuff. Even easier with lambdas in C++11. –  Macke Aug 29 '13 at 10:57
    
True, but if you end up using shared_ptr for things that are not pointers, consider at least typedef-ing it: namespace xyz { typedef shared_ptr<some_handle> shared_handle; shared_handle make_shared_handle(a, b, c); }; In this case (with make_handle setting the correct deleter type on construction), the name of the type no longer suggests it is a pointer. –  utnapistim Aug 29 '13 at 11:10
add comment

I'm adding an answer for the sake of completeness. A number of other answers pointed out that the large condition block could be split out into a separate function. But as was also pointed out a number of times is that this approach separates the conditional code from the original context. This is one reason that lambdas were added to the language in C++11. Using lambdas was suggested by others but no explicit sample was provided. I've put one in this answer. What strikes me is that it feels very similar to the do { } while(0) approach in many ways - and maybe that means it's still a goto in disguise....

earlier operations
...
[&]()->void {

    if (!check()) return;
    ...
    ...
    if (!check()) return;
    ...
    ...
    if (!check()) return;
    ...
    ...
}();
later operations
share|improve this answer
5  
To me this hack looks worse than the do...while hack. –  Michael Aug 30 '13 at 18:30
add comment

Certainly not the answer, but an answer (for the sake of completeness)

Instead of :

do {
    if(!check()) break;
    ...
    ...
    if(!check()) break;
    ...
    ...
    if(!check()) break;
    ...
    ...
} while(0);

You could write:

switch (0) {
case 0:
    if(!check()) break;
    ...
    ...
    if(!check()) break;
    ...
    ...
    if(!check()) break;
    ...
    ...
}

This is still a goto in disguise, but at least it's not a loop any more. Which means you won't have to very carefully check there is not some continue hidden somewhere in the block.

The construct is also simple enough that you can hope the compiler will optimize it away.

As suggested by @jamesdlin, you can even hide that behind a macro like

#define BLOC switch(0) case 0:

And use it like

BLOC {
    if(!check()) break;
    ...
    ...
    if(!check()) break;
    ...
    ...
    if(!check()) break;
    ...
    ...
}

This is possible because the C language syntax expect a statement after a switch, not a bracketed block and you can put a case label before that statement. Until now I didn't see the point of allowing that, but in this particular case it is handy to hide the switch behind a nice macro.

share|improve this answer
1  
Ooh, clever. You could even hide it behind a macro like define BLOCK switch (0) case 0: and use it like BLOCK { ... break; }. –  jamesdlin Aug 30 '13 at 19:28
    
@jamesdlin: it never occurred to me before that it could be useful tu put a case before the opening bracket of a switch. But it is indeed allowed by C and in this case it is handy to write a nice macro. –  kriss Sep 4 '13 at 7:00
add comment

I would recommend an approach similar to Mats answer minus the unnecessary goto. Only put the conditional logic in the function. Any code that always runs should go before or after the function is invoked in the caller:

void main()
{
    //do stuff always
    func();
    //do other stuff always
}

void func()
{
    if (!condition)
        return;
    ...
    if (!other condition)
        return;
    ...
    if (!another condition)
        return;
    ... 
    if (!yet another condition)
        return;
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
2  
If you have to acquire another resource in the middle of func, you need to factor-out another function (per your pattern). If all these isolated functions need the same data, you'll just end up copying the same stack arguments over and over, or decide to allocate your arguments on the heap and pass a pointer around, not leveraging the most basic of the language's feature (function arguments). In short, I don't believe this solution scales for the worst case where every condition is checked after acquiring new resources that must be cleaned up. Note Nawaz comment about lambdas however. –  tne Aug 29 '13 at 14:36
2  
I don't remember the OP saying anything about acquiring resources in the middle his code block, but I accept that as a feasible requirement. In that case what is wrong with declaring the resource on the stack anywhere in func() and allowing its destructor to handle freeing resources? If anything outside of func() needs access to the same resource it should be declared on the heap prior to calling func() by a proper resource manager. –  Dan Aug 29 '13 at 14:48
add comment

The code flow itself is already a code smell that to much is happening in the function. If there is not a direct solution to that (the function is a general check function), then using RAII so you can return instead of jumping to the an end-section of the function might be better.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you don't need to introduce local variables during the execution then you can often flatten this:

if (check()) {
  doStuff();
}  
if (stillOk()) {
  doMoreStuff();
}
if (amIStillReallyOk()) {
  doEvenMore();
}

// edit 
doThingsAtEndAndReportErrorStatus()
share|improve this answer
2  
But then each condition would have to include the previous one, which is not only ugly but potentially bad for performance. Better to jump over those checks and cleanup immediately as soon as we know we're "not OK". –  tne Aug 29 '13 at 14:29
    
That's true, however this approach does have advantages if there are things that have to be done at the end so you don't want to return early (see edit). If you combine with Denise's approach of using bools in the conditions, then the performance hit will be negligible unless this is in a very tight loop. –  the_mandrill Aug 30 '13 at 8:28
add comment

For me do{...}while(0) is fine. If you don't want to see the do{...}while(0), you can define alternative keywords for them.

Example:

#define BEGIN_TEST do{
#define END_TEST }while(0);

BEGIN_TEST
   if(!condition1) break;
   if(!condition2) break;
   if(!condition3) break;
   if(!condition4) break;
   if(!condition5) break;

   //processing code here

END_TEST

I think the compiler will remove the unneccessary while(0) condition in do{...}while(0) in binary version and convert the breaks into unconditional jump. You can check it's assembly language version to be sure.

Using goto also produces cleaner code and it is straightforward with the condition-then-jump logic. You can do the following:

{
   if(!condition1) goto end_blahblah;
   if(!condition2) goto end_blahblah;
   if(!condition3) goto end_blahblah;
   if(!condition4) goto end_blahblah;
   if(!condition5) goto end_blahblah;

   //processing code here

 }end_blah_blah:;  //use appropriate label here to describe...
                   //  ...the whole code inside the block.

Note the label is placed after the closing }. This is the avoid one possible problem in goto that is accidentally placing a code in between because you didn't see the label. It is now like do{...}while(0) without condition code.

To make this code cleaner and more comprehensible, you can do this:

#define BEGIN_TEST {
#define END_TEST(_test_label_) }_test_label_:;
#define FAILED(_test_label_) goto _test_label_

BEGIN_TEST
   if(!condition1) FAILED(NormalizeData);
   if(!condition2) FAILED(NormalizeData);
   if(!condition3) FAILED(NormalizeData);
   if(!condition4) FAILED(NormalizeData);
   if(!condition5) FAILED(NormalizeData);

END_TEST(NormalizeData)

With this, you can do nested blocks and specify where you want to exit/jump-out.

#define BEGIN_TEST {
#define END_TEST(_test_label_) }_test_label_:;
#define FAILED(_test_label_) goto _test_label_

BEGIN_TEST
   if(!condition1) FAILED(NormalizeData);
   if(!condition2) FAILED(NormalizeData);

   BEGIN_TEST
      if(!conditionAA) FAILED(DecryptBlah);
      if(!conditionBB) FAILED(NormalizeData);   //Jump out to the outmost block
      if(!conditionCC) FAILED(DecryptBlah);

      // --We can now decrypt and do other stuffs.

   END_TEST(DecryptBlah)

   if(!condition3) FAILED(NormalizeData);
   if(!condition4) FAILED(NormalizeData);

   // --other code here

   BEGIN_TEST
      if(!conditionA) FAILED(TrimSpaces);
      if(!conditionB) FAILED(TrimSpaces);
      if(!conditionC) FAILED(NormalizeData);   //Jump out to the outmost block
      if(!conditionD) FAILED(TrimSpaces);

      // --We can now trim completely or do other stuffs.

   END_TEST(TrimSpaces)

   // --Other code here...

   if(!condition5) FAILED(NormalizeData);

   //Ok, we got here. We can now process what we need to process.

END_TEST(NormalizeData)

Spaghetti code is not the fault of goto, it's the fault of the programmer. You can still produce spaghetti code without using goto.

share|improve this answer
5  
I'd choose goto over extending the language syntax using the preprocessor a million times over. –  Christian Aug 30 '13 at 11:48
add comment

Similar to dasblinkenlight's answer, but avoids the assignment inside the if that could get "fixed" by a code reviewer:

bool goOn = check0();
if (goOn) {
    ...
    goOn = check1();
}
if (goOn) {
    ...
    goOn = check2();
}
if (goOn) {
    ...
}

...

I use this pattern when the results of a step need to be checked before the next step, which differs from a situation where all the checks could be done up front with a big if( check1() && check2()... type pattern.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that check1() could really be PerformStep1() which returns a result code of the step. This would keep down the complexity of your process flow function. –  Denise Skidmore Aug 29 '13 at 17:33
add comment

Use exceptions, your code will look much more cleaner (and exceptions were created exactly for handling errors in the execution flow of a program). For cleaning up resources (file descriptors, DB connections, etc), read this article http://www.stroustrup.com/bs_faq2.html#finally.

#include <iostream>
#include <stdexcept>   // for exception, runtime_error, out_of_range

int main () {
    try {
        if (!condition)
            throw std::runtime_error("nope.");
        ...
        if (!other condition)
            throw std::runtime_error("nope again.");
        ...
        if (!another condition)
            throw std::runtime_error("told you.");
        ... 
        if (!yet another condition)
            throw std::runtime_error("OK, just forget it...");
    }
    catch (std::runtime_error &e) {
        std::cout << e.what() << std::endl;
    }
    catch (...) {
        std::cout << "Caught an unknown exception\n";
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
9  
Really? First, I honestly don't see any readability improvement, there. DO NOT USE EXCEPTIONS TO CONTROL PROGRAM FLOW. That IS NOT their proper purpose. Also, exceptions bring significant performance penalties. The proper use case for an exception is when some condition is present THAT YOU CAN NOT DO ANYTHING ABOUT, such as trying to open a file that is already exclusively locked by another process, or a network connection fails, or a call to a database fails, or a caller passes an invalid parameter to a procedure. That sort of thing. But DO NOT use exceptions to control program flow. –  Craig Aug 30 '13 at 19:51
2  
I mean, not to be a snot about it, but go to that Stroustrup article you referenced and look for the "What shouldn't I use exceptions for?" section. Among other things, he says: "In particular, throw is not simply an alternative way of returning a value from a function (similar to return). Doing so will be slow and will confuse most C++ programmers used to seing exceptions used only for error handling. Similarly, throw is not a good way of getting out of a loop." –  Craig Aug 30 '13 at 19:59
3  
@Craig All that you have pointed is right, but you are assuming that the sample program can continue after a check() condition fail, and that's certantly YOUR assumption, there is no context in the sample. Assuming that the program cannot continue, using exceptions is the way to go. –  Cartucho Aug 30 '13 at 20:34
1  
Well, true enough if that is actually the context. But, funny thing about assumptions... ;-) –  Craig Aug 30 '13 at 20:36
add comment

This is a well-known and well-solved problem from a functional programming perspective - the maybe monad.

In response to the comment I received below I have edited my introduction here: You can find full details about implementing C++ monads in various places which will allow you to achieve what Rotsor suggests. It takes a while to grok monads so instead I'm going to suggest here a quick "poor-mans" monad-like mechanism for which you need know about nothing more than boost::optional.

Set up your computation steps as follows:

boost::optional<EnabledContext> enabled(boost::optional<Context> context);
boost::optional<EnergisedContext> energised(boost::optional<EnabledContext> context);

Each computational step can obviously do something like return boost::none if the optional it was given is empty. So for example:

struct Context { std::string coordinates_filename; /* ... */ };

struct EnabledContext { int x; int y; int z; /* ... */ };

boost::optional<EnabledContext> enabled(boost::optional<Context> c) {
   if (!c) return boost::none; // this line becomes implicit if going the whole hog with monads
   if (!exists((*c).coordinates_filename)) return boost::none; // return none when any error is encountered.
   EnabledContext ec;
   std::ifstream file_in((*c).coordinates_filename.c_str());
   file_in >> ec.x >> ec.y >> ec.z;
   return boost::optional<EnabledContext>(ec); // All ok. Return non-empty value.
}

Then chain them together:

Context context("planet_surface.txt", ...); // Close over all needed bits and pieces

boost::optional<EnergisedContext> result(energised(enabled(context)));
if (result) { // A single level "if" statement
    // do work on *result
} else {
    // error
}

The nice thing about this is that you can write clearly defined unit tests for each computational step. Also the invocation reads like plain English (as is usually the case with functional style).

If you don't care about immutability and it is more convenient to return the same object each time you could come up with some variation using shared_ptr or the like.

share|improve this answer
3  
This code has an undesired property of forcing each of the individual functions to handle failure of the previous function, thus not properly utilising the Monad idiom (where monadic effects, in this case failure, are supposed to be handled implicitly). To do that you need to have optional<EnabledContext> enabled(Context); optional<EnergisedContext> energised(EnabledContext); instead and use the monadic composition operation ('bind') rather than function application. –  Rotsor Aug 30 '13 at 0:42
    
Thanks. You are correct - that is the way to do it properly. I didn't want to write too much in my answer to explain that (hence the term "poor-mans" which was meant to suggest I wasn't going the whole hog here). –  Benedict Aug 30 '13 at 8:21
add comment

How about moving the if statements into an extra function yielding a numerical or enum result?

int ConditionCode (void) {
   if (condition1)
      return 1;
   if (condition2)
      return 2;
   ...
   return 0;
}


void MyFunc (void) {
   switch (ConditionCode ()) {
      case 1:
         ...
         break;

      case 2:
         ...
         break;

      ...

      default:
         ...
         break;
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is nice when possible, but much less general than the question asked here. Every condition could depends on the code executed after the last debranching test. –  kriss Aug 29 '13 at 22:43
    
The problem here is you separate cause and consequence. I.e. you separate code that refers to the same condition number and this can be a source of further bugs. –  Riga Aug 30 '13 at 9:34
    
@kriss: Well, the ConditionCode() function could be adjusted to take care of this. They key point of that function is that you can use return <result> for a clean exit as soon as a final condition has been computed; And that is what is providing structural clarity here. –  karx11erx Aug 30 '13 at 17:16
    
@Riga: Imo these are completely academic objections. I find C++ to become more complex, cryptic and unreadable with every new version. I cannot see a problem with a small helper function evaluating complex conditions in a well structured way to make the target function right below more readable. –  karx11erx Aug 30 '13 at 17:19
    
@Riga: I am pointing that this is not exactly an answer to the OP question. (ie: answering to "How can I do this ?" by "You should do something else instead"). This does not mean you are not right. –  kriss Sep 4 '13 at 8:28
show 1 more comment

I am not particularly into the way using break or return in such a case. Given that normally when we are facing such a situation, it is usually a comparatively long method.

If we are having multiple exit points, it may cause difficulties when we want to know what will cause certain logic to be executed: Normally we just keep on going up blocks enclosing that piece of logic, and the criteria of those enclosing block tell us the situation:

For example,

if (conditionA) {
    ....
    if (conditionB) {
        ....
        if (conditionC) {
            myLogic();
        }
    }
}

By looking at enclosing blocks, it is easy to find out that myLogic() only happen when conditionA and conditionB and conditionC is true.

It becomes a lot less visible when there are early returns:

if (conditionA) {
    ....
    if (!conditionB) {
        return;
    }
    if (!conditionD) {
        return;
    }
    if (conditionC) {
        myLogic();
    }
}

We can no longer navigate up from myLogic(), looking at enclosing block to figure out the condition.

There are different workarounds that I used. Here is one of them:

if (conditionA) {
    isA = true;
    ....
}

if (isA && conditionB) {
    isB = true;
    ...
}

if (isB && conditionC) {
    isC = true;
    myLogic();
}

(Of course it is welcomed to use the same variable to replace all isA isB isC.)

Such an approach will at least give the reader of code, that myLogic() is executed when isB && conditionC. The reader is given a hint that he need to further lookup what will cause isB to be true.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Something like this perhaps

#define EVER ;;

for(EVER)
{
    if(!check()) break;
}

or use exceptions

try
{
    for(;;)
        if(!check()) throw 1;
}
catch()
{
}

Using exceptions you can also pass data.

share|improve this answer
9  
Please don't do clever things like your definition of ever, they usually make code harder to read for fellow developers. I've seen somebody defining Case as break;case in a header file, and used it in a switch in a cpp file, making others wonder for hours why the switch breaks between Case statements. Grrr... –  Michael Aug 30 '13 at 18:35
3  
And when you name macros, you should make them look like macros (i.e., in all uppercase). Otherwise someone who happens to name a variable/function/type/etc. named ever will be very unhappy... –  jamesdlin Aug 30 '13 at 19:18
add comment
typedef bool (*Checker)();

Checker * checkers[]={
 &checker0,&checker1,.....,&checkerN,NULL
};

bool checker1(){
  if(condition){
    .....
    .....
    return true;
  }
  return false;
}

bool checker2(){
  if(condition){
    .....
    .....
    return true;
  }
  return false;
}

......

void doCheck(){
  Checker ** checker = checkers;
  while( *checker && (*checker)())
    checker++;
}

How about that?

share|improve this answer
    
the if is obsolete, just return condition;, otherwise I think this is well maintainable. –  SpaceTrucker Sep 5 '13 at 6:28
add comment

I'm not a C++ programmer, so I won't write any code here, but so far nobody has mentioned an object oriented solution. So here is my guess on that:

Have a generic interface that provides a method to evaluate a single condition. Now you can use a list of implementations of those conditions in your object containing the method in question. You iterate over the list and evaluate each condition, possibly breaking out early if one fails.

The good thing is that such design sticks very well to the open/closed principle, because you can easily add new conditions during initialization of the object containing the method in question. You can even add a second method to the interface with the method for condition evaluation returning a description of the condition. This can be used for self-documenting systems.

The downside, however, is that there is slightly more overhead involved because of the usage of more objects and the iteration over the list.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you add an example in a different language? I think this question applies to many languages although it was asked specifically about C++. –  Denise Skidmore Sep 23 '13 at 14:15
add comment

Another pattern useful if you need different cleanup steps depending on where the failure is:

    private ResultCode DoEverything()
    {
        ResultCode processResult = ResultCode.FAILURE;
        if (DoStep1() != ResultCode.SUCCESSFUL)
        {
            Step1FailureCleanup();
        }
        else if (DoStep2() != ResultCode.SUCCESSFUL)
        {
            Step2FailureCleanup();
            processResult = ResultCode.SPECIFIC_FAILURE;
        }
        else if (DoStep3() != ResultCode.SUCCESSFUL)
        {
            Step3FailureCleanup();
        }
        ...
        else
        {
            processResult = ResultCode.SUCCESSFUL;
        }
        return processResult;
    }
share|improve this answer
add comment

First, a short example to show why goto is not a good solution for C++:

struct Bar {
    Bar();
};

extern bool check();

void foo()
{
    if (!check())
       goto out;

    Bar x;

    out:
}

Try to compile this into an object file and see what happens. Then try the equivalent do+ break + while(0).

That was an aside. The main point follows.

Those little chunks of code often require some kind of cleanup should the whole function fail. Those cleanups usually want to happen in the opposite order from the chunks themselves, as you "unwind" the partially-finished computation.

One option to obtain these semantics is RAII; see @utnapistim's answer. C++ guarantees that automatic destructors run in the opposite order to constructors, which naturally supplies an "unwinding".

But that requires lots of RAII classes. Sometimes a simpler option is just to use the stack:

bool calc1()
{
    if (!check())
        return false;

    // ... Do stuff1 here ...

    if (!calc2()) {
        // ... Undo stuff1 here ...
        return false;
    }

    return true;
}

bool calc2()
{
    if (!check())
        return false;

    // ... Do stuff2 here ...

    if (!calc3()) {
        // ... Undo stuff2 here ...
        return false;
    }

    return true;
}

...and so on. This is easy to audit, since it puts the "undo" code next to the "do" code. Easy auditing is good. It also makes the control flow very clear. It is a useful pattern for C, too.

It can require the calc functions to take lots of arguments, but that is usually not a problem if your classes/structs have good cohesion. (That is, stuff that belongs together lives in a single object, so these functions can take pointers or references to a small number of objects and still do lots of useful work.)

share|improve this answer
    
Very easy to audit the cleanup path, but maybe not so easy to trace the golden path. But overall, I think something like this does encourage a consistent cleanup pattern. –  Denise Skidmore Sep 23 '13 at 14:13
add comment

I am amazed by the number of different answers being presented here. But, finally in the code which I have to change (i.e. remove this do-while(0) hack or anything), I did something different from any of the answers being mentioned here and I am confused why no one thought this. Here's what I did:

Initial code:

do {

    if(!check()) break;
    ...
    ...
    if(!check()) break;
    ...
    ...
    if(!check()) break;
    ...
    ...
} while(0);

finishingUpStuff.

Now:

finish(params)
{
  ...
  ...
}

if(!check()){
    finish(params);    
    return;
}
...
...
if(!check()){
    finish(params);    
    return;
}
...
...
if(!check()){
    finish(params);    
    return;
}
...
...

So, what has been done here is that the finishing up stuff has been isolated in a function and things have suddenly become so simple and clean!

I thought this solution was worth mentioning, so provided it here.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you code has a long block of if..else if..else statements, you may try and rewrite the entire block with the help of Functors or function pointers. It may not be the right solution always but quite often is.

http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/functors-function-objects-in-c++.html

share|improve this answer
    
In principle this is possible (and not bad), but with explicit function objects or -pointers it just disrupts the code flow far too strongly. OTOH the, here equivalent, use of lambdas or ordinary named functions is good practise, efficient and reads well. –  leftaroundabout Sep 2 '13 at 10:43
add comment

This is the way I do it.

void func() {
  if (!check()) return;
  ...
  ...

  if (!check()) return;
  ...
  ...

  if (!check()) return;
  ...
  ...
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Consolidate it into one if statement:

if(
    condition
    && other_condition
    && another_condition
    && yet_another_condition
    && ...
) {
        if (final_cond){
            //Do stuff
        } else {
            //Do other stuff
        }
}

This is the pattern used in languages such as java where the goto keyword was removed.

share|improve this answer
2  
That only works if you don't have to do any stuff between the condition-tests. (well, I suppose you could hide the doing-of-stuff inside some function calls made by the condition-tests, but that might get a bit obfuscated if you did it too much) –  Jeremy Friesner Aug 29 '13 at 15:55
    
@JeremyFriesner Actually, you could actually do the in-between-stuff as separate boolean functions that always evaluate as true. Short circuit evaluation would guarantee that you never run in-between stuff for which all the prerequisite tests did not pass. –  AJMansfield Aug 29 '13 at 19:34
    
@AJMansfield yes, that's what I was referring to in my second sentence... but I'm not sure doing that would be an improvement in code quality. –  Jeremy Friesner Aug 29 '13 at 19:42
    
@JeremyFriesner Nothing stops you from writing the conditions as (/*do other stuff*/, /*next condition*/), you could even format it nicely. Just don't expect people to like it. But honestly, this only goes to show that it was a mistake for Java to phase out that goto statement... –  cmaster Aug 29 '13 at 19:53
    
@JeremyFriesner I was assuming that these were booleans. If functions were to be run inside of each condition, than there is a better way to handle it. –  Tyzoid Aug 29 '13 at 20:17
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.