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What is the equivalent of the following C# code in C++/CLI?

public abstract class SomeClass
{
    public abstract String SomeMethod();
}
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up vote 13 down vote accepted

Just mix up the keywords a bit to arrive at the correct syntax. abstract goes in the front in C# but at the end in C++/CLI. Same as the override keyword, also recognized today by C++11 compliant compilers which expect it at the end of the function declaration. Like = 0 does in traditional C++ to mark a function abstract:

public ref class SomeClass abstract {
public:
  virtual String^ SomeMethod() abstract;
};
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3  
Is there any difference between declaring "SomeMethod() = 0" and "SomeMethod() abstract"? – Lopper Dec 5 '09 at 1:44
    
No. = 0 is C++ syntax but C++/CLI supports it too. – Hans Passant Dec 5 '09 at 2:19
    
@nobugz: Thanks! – Lopper Dec 5 '09 at 2:46

You use abstract:

public ref class SomeClass abstract
{
    public:
        virtual System::String^ SomeMethod() = 0;
}
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Is there any difference between declaring "SomeMethod() = 0" and "SomeMethod() abstract"? – Lopper Dec 5 '09 at 1:44
    
Nope. The Method() = 0 is the non-C++/CLI (just stnadard C++) way of defining an abstract class. With C++/CLI, you can use it, or the new abstract keyword. I prefer using the original, since it's just habit, and the abstract keyword is context sensitive in the case of a method, but either works. See: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/b0z6b513(VS.80).aspx – Reed Copsey Dec 5 '09 at 1:48
    
@Reed Copsey: Thanks! – Lopper Dec 5 '09 at 2:47

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