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I have a swing class that includes a String variable str3 declared as final and two

ActionListener interfaces that implemented by two JButtons b1

and b2 , when b1 JButton is pressed str3 String takes a value ,

My question here how to make str3 value to be changed throughout the class

rather in the second ActionListener interface (not in the first inner class only ) .

import java.awt.*;
import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import java.util.*;

public class mySwing extends JFrame {

    JButton b1, b2;

    public mySwing() {
        final String str3;
        JPanel panel = new JPanel();
        b1 = new JButton("please click me first");
        b2 = new JButton("please click me second");
        final JTextField txt = new JTextField("                            ");
        panel.add(txt);
        Container pane = getContentPane();
        panel.add(b1);
        panel.add(b2);
        pane.add(panel);
        str3 = new String();
        b1.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent acv) {
                String input = "HelloWorld";
                String str3 = new String(input.substring(0, 5));
                txt.setText(str3);
            }
        });
        b2.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent acv) {
                txt.setText(str3);
            }
        });
        setVisible(true);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new mySwing();
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just make str3 a non-final instance variable of your outer class mySwing.

By the way, do not do things like new String(input.substring(0, 5)) the result of input.substring(0, 5) is a String so you don`t need to create another String.

Based on your code:

import java.awt.*;
import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import java.util.*;

public class mySwing extends JFrame {

    JButton b1, b2;
    String str3="";

    public mySwing() {
        JPanel panel = new JPanel();
        b1 = new JButton("please click me first");
        b2 = new JButton("please click me second");
        final JTextField txt = new JTextField("                            ");
        panel.add(txt);
        Container pane = getContentPane();
        panel.add(b1);
        panel.add(b2);
        pane.add(panel);
        str3 = new String();
        b1.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent acv) {
                str3+=" (1)";
                txt.setText(str3);
            }
        });
        b2.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent acv) {
              str3+=" (2)";
              txt.setText(str3);
            }
        });
        setVisible(true);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new mySwing();
    }
}
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No it must be final to be accessed from an inner class –  Elhadi Mamoun Aug 29 '13 at 11:58
1  
It has to be final only if it is a local variable. When creating an instance variable it can be accessed by inner classes without being final. Just try it out. Or look at your buttons b1 and b2. They can be accessed by your inner classes without being final. –  Holger Aug 29 '13 at 12:00
    
please more explanation I don't understand your idea –  Elhadi Mamoun Aug 29 '13 at 12:26
    
I added an example –  Holger Aug 29 '13 at 12:32
    
Thank you it works fine. –  Elhadi Mamoun Aug 29 '13 at 12:40

Your approach of declaring the variable str3 as final is correct. However, in Java Strings cannot change their contents, so you would have to do something different. Some ideas I can come across:

  1. Use a StringBuffer instead, and convert it to a String with the toString() method where needed.
  2. Use some other POJO with a getter and setter for your String, this way the POJO will be declared as final and the content can be changed via the getter and setter.

Hope this helps as a guideline, there sure are many other good approaches.

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Thank you. the matter here is not Strings Members but rather changing variable values , So I will try the second option –  Elhadi Mamoun Aug 29 '13 at 12:04

your variable str3 is a final, then it can never be changed.

inside your code you've never tried to change it, you just declared a new str3 inside your ActionListener inner class.

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Look below b2.addActionListener(new ActionListener() , Why str3 value is null( I want to make it as the value in the previous inner class) –  Elhadi Mamoun Aug 29 '13 at 11:57
    
final String str3; is your "final" declaration that's mean str3 will never change during the run of the program, after that you've initialized your str3 (str3 = new String() <-- new String() return null), and str3 will be null for ever. now inside b1, you've declared another str3 (String str3 = new String(input.substring(0, 5));) and it's not the same str3 above, and if you try to do str3 = "someString"; the compiler will complain. Now str3 inside b2 is pointing/referring to the first str3 with the null value, because it can't see the str3 inside b1 and it's null.. –  Wagdi Kala Aug 29 '13 at 15:47

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