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I have recently noticed that a quick script I had written in Perl that was designed to be used on sub 10MB files has been modified, re-tasked and used in 40MB+ text files with significant performance issues in a batch environment.

The jobs have been running for about 12 hours per run when encountering a large text file and I am wondering how do I improve the perfomance of the code? Should I slurp the file into memory and if I do it will break the jobs reliance on the line numbers in the file. Any constructive thought would be greatly appreciated, I know the job is looping through the file too many times but how to reduce that?

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my $filename = "$ARGV[0]"; # This is needed for regular batch use 
my $cancfile = "$ARGV[1]"; # This is needed for regular batch use 
my @num =();
open(FILE, "<", "$filename") || error("Cannot open file ($!)");
while (<FILE>)
{
    push (@num, $.) if (/^P\|/)
}
close FILE;

my $start;
my $end;

my $loop = scalar(@num);
my $counter =1;
my $test;

open (OUTCANC, ">>$cancfile") || error ("Could not open file: ($!)");

#Lets print out the letters minus the CANCEL letters
for ( 1 .. $loop )
{
    $start = shift(@num) if ( ! $start );
    $end = shift(@num);
    my $next = $end;
    $end--;
    my $exclude = "FALSE";

    open(FILE, "<", "$filename") || error("Cannot open file ($!)");
    while (<FILE>)
    {
        my $line = $_;
        $test = $. if ( eof );
        if ( $. == $start && $line =~ /^P\|[0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]\|1I\|IR\|/)
        {
            print OUTCANC "$line";
            $exclude = "TRUECANC";
            next;
        }
        if ( $. >= $start && $. <= $end && $exclude =~ "TRUECANC")
        {
            print OUTCANC "$line";
        } elsif ( $. >= $start && $. <= $end && $exclude =~ "FALSE"){
            print $_;
        }
    }
    close FILE;
    $end = ++$test if ( $end < $start );
    $start = $next if ($next);
}


#Lets print the last letter in the file

my $exclude = "FALSE";

open(FILE, "<", "$filename") || error("Cannot open file ($!)");
while (<FILE>)
{
    my $line = $_;
    if ( $. == $start && $line =~ /^P\|[0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]\|1I\|IR\|/)
    {
        $exclude = "TRUECANC";
        next;
    }
    if ( $. >= $start && $. <= $end && $exclude =~ "TRUECANC")
    {
        print OUTCANC "$line";
    } elsif ( $. >= $start && $. <= $end && $exclude =~ "FALSE"){
        print $_;
    }
}
close FILE;
close OUTCANC;


#----------------------------------------------------------------

sub message
{
    my $m = shift or return;
    print("$m\n");
}

sub error
{
    my $e = shift || 'unknown error';
    print("$0: $e\n");
    exit 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
What does the script do? What is the typical input and what is the corresponding expected output? –  choroba Aug 29 '13 at 11:40
    
maybe you can reduce code and drill down where the code performce is.. This way you will getting better answer, and maybe you will figure it out yourself :) –  lordkain Aug 29 '13 at 11:47
    
40 MB file can easily stand in memory. –  M42 Aug 29 '13 at 11:51
1  
You might want to try this on Code Review instead of here, where it's somewhat more on topic –  Hasturkun Aug 29 '13 at 11:54
    
exclude seems to only ever contain 2 different values, use a 0/1 flag so you can test its value as a boolean instead of by textual matching in each line (for maintainability you can of course use manifest constants instead of 0/1 literals). another option might be to read the file in slurp mode ({ local $/ = undef; $fcontent = <FILE>; }, note the wrapping into a new block) and match against $fcontent, moving between matches using the \G anchor in your regexp. –  collapsar Aug 29 '13 at 11:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are some things that could speed the script up, like removing unneccessary regex usage.

  • /^P\|/ is equivalent to "P|" eq substr $_, 0, 2.
  • $foo =~ "BAR" could be -1 != index $foo, "BAR".

Then there is some repeated code. Factoring that out into a sub will not increase performance per se, but makes it easier to reason about the behaviour of the script.

There are a lot of unneccessary stringifications like "$filename"$filename alone is sufficient.

But the worst offender would be this:

for ( 1 .. $loop ) {
  ...
  open FILE, "<", $filename or ...
  while (<FILE>) {
    ...
  }
  ...
}

You only need to read that file in once, preferably into an array. You can the loop over the indices:

for ( 1 .. $loop ) {
  ...
  for my $i (0 .. $#file_contents) {
    my $line = $file_contents[$i];
    ... # swap $. for $i, but avoid off-by-one error
  }
  ...
}

Disk IO is slow, so cache where you can!

I also see that you are using the $exclude variable as a boolean with the values FALSE and TRUECANC. Why not 0 and 1, so you can use it directly in a conditional?

You can factor out common tests in if/elsif:

if    (FOO && BAR) { THING_A }
elsif (FOO && BAZ) { THING_B }

should be

if (FOO) {
    if    (BAR) { THING_A }
    elsif (BAZ) { THING_B }
}

The $. == $start && $line =~ /^P\|.../ test may be silly, because $start contains only the numbers of lines that start with P| – so the regex may be sufficient here.

Edit

If I have understood the script correctly then the following should yield a significant performance increase:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my ($filename, $cancfile) = @ARGV;
open my $fh, "<", $filename or die "$0: Couldn't open $filename: $!";

my (@num, @lines);
while (<$fh>)
{
    push @lines, $_;
    push @num, $#lines if "P|" eq substr $_, 0, 2;
}

open my $outcanc, ">>", $cancfile or die "$0: Couldn't open $cancfile: $!";

for my $i ( 0 .. $#num )
{
    my $start = $num[$i];
    my $end   = ($num[$i+1] // @lines) - 1;
    # pre v5.10:
    # my $end = (defined $num[$i+1] ? $num[$i+1] : @lines) - 1

    if ($lines[$start] =~ /^P[|][0-9]{9}[|]1I[|]IR[|]/) {
        print {$outcanc} @lines[$start .. $end];
    } else {
        print STDOUT     @lines[$start .. $end];
    }
}

The script is cleaned up. The file is cached in an array. Only the parts of the array are iterated that are actually needed – we are down to O(n) from the previous O(n · m).

For your future scripts: Proving behaviour around loops and mutating variables is not impossible, but tedious and annoying. Realizing that

for (1 .. @num) {
  $start = shift @num unless $next;  # aka "do this only in the first iteration"
  $next = shift @num:
  $end = $next - 1:
  while (<FH>) {
    ...
    $test = $. if eof
    ...
  }
  $end = ++test if $end < $start;
  $start = $next if $next;
}

is actually all about circumventing a possible undef in the 2nd shift takes some time. Instead of testing for eof in the inner loop, we can just pick the line number after the loop, so we don't need $test. Then we get:

$start = shift @num;
for my $i (1 .. @num) {
  $end = $num[$i] - 1:

  while (<FH>) { ... }

  $end = $. + 1 if $end < $start;  # $end < $start only true if not defined $num[$i]
  $start = $num[$i] if $num[$i];
}

After translating $i down by one we confine the out-of-bounds problem to one point only:

for my $i (0 .. $#num) {
  $start = $num[$i];
  $end = $num[$i+1] - 1; # HERE: $end = -1 if $i == $#num

  while (<FH>) { ... }
}
$end = $. + 1 if $end < $start;

After replacing the file reading with an array (careful, there is a difference of one between the array index and the line number), we see that the final file reading loop can be avoided if we pull that iteration into the for loop, because we know how many lines there are in total. So to say, we do

$end = ($num[$i+1] // $last_line_number) - 1;

Hopefully my cleaned up code is indeed equivalent to the original.

share|improve this answer
    
I updated with example cleaned up code that should be faster. Because I don't have test data I'm not sure that it is correct, so I had to fall back to error-prone informal proofs of the program state. –  amon Aug 29 '13 at 13:34
    
I think you have indeed understood the script correctly. I have run some tests on my development machine and everything works as expected. I would like to run the code against some larger files and report back if thats OK? I also need to take some time to process your comments, thank you for your thoughtful and detailed input. –  Chris Aug 29 '13 at 14:33
    
The code runs very well on ActivePerl 5.14.2 but I am having some issues getting it to run on Solaris 5.8.4. It will be tomorrow before I get a chance to look at it again. –  Chris Aug 29 '13 at 15:39
1  
I had added a couple of comments and two close filehandles that clearly didn't work. The code works with the amendments for pre 5.10. The only issue is that it doesn't print the last record from the file to STDOUT. I am using a redirect to capture the STDOUT and it is this ouput that is being used. The $cancfile is just a record of what has been removed. When tested on a Solaris server the run time drops from 12+ hours to a few seconds. A wonderful example of how to do it, Thank you! –  Chris Aug 30 '13 at 8:34
1  
working as expect with that change and run time is under five seconds now, perfect! –  Chris Aug 30 '13 at 10:55

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