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Okay, I've been struggling with this weird error since yesterday, so I guess it's time to ask the community...

I'm currently working in Objective-C++, and I have a purely C++ class declaration in a header file like this:

#ifndef __MATRIX_H__
#define __MATRIX_H__

#define USE_NEON_UPSAMPLING2X true
#define USE_NEON_THRESHOLD true

typedef float OCRfloat;

template<class T = OCRfloat>
class Matrix {

public:
    ...

    Matrix threshold(T thresholdValue) const;

    ...

    Matrix upsample2x() const;

    ...
};

#ifdef TARGET_OS_IPHONE

#if USE_NEON_UPSAMPLING2X
template<> Matrix<float> Matrix<float>::upsample2x() const;
#endif

#if USE_NEON_THRESHOLD
template<> Matrix<float> Matrix<float>::threshold(float thresholdValue) const;
#endif

#endif

#include "Matrix.cpp"

#endif

It's template class, with basic matrix operations, however, I want to optimize some bottlenecks by template specialization on T=float. I have the included Matrix.cpp file as follows:

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>

#if defined TARGET_OS_IPHONE
#include <Accelerate/Accelerate.h>
#endif

...

template<class T> Matrix<T> Matrix<T>::threshold(T thresholdValue) const {
   ... // general naive algorithm
}

template<class T> Matrix<T> Matrix<T>::upsample2x() const{
   ... // general naive algorithm
}

#ifdef TARGET_OS_IPHONE

#if USE_NEON_UPSAMPLING2X
template<> Matrix<float> Matrix<float>::upsample2x() const{
   ... // specialized for ARM NEON float32_t
}
#endif

#if USE_NEON_THRESHOLD
template<> Matrix<float> Matrix<float>::threshold(float thresholdValue)const{
   ... // specialized for ARM NEON float32_t
}
#endif

The problem is the following: If I define USE_NEON_UPSAMPLING2X=false and USE_NEON_THRESHOLD=true, everything works fine - the app is built, and works like charm. However, if I set USE_NEON_UPSAMPLING2X=true, the linker breaks with the following:

duplicate symbol __ZNK6MatrixIfE10upsample2xEv in:
    /.../OCRDemo-eggnlcolcwqycjagwvwddpfwgzlb/Build/Intermediates/OCRDemo.build/Release-iphoneos/OCRDemo.build/Objects-normal/armv7/A.o
    /.../OCRDemo-eggnlcolcwqycjagwvwddpfwgzlb/Build/Intermediates/OCRDemo.build/Release-iphoneos/OCRDemo.build/Objects-normal/armv7/B.o
duplicate symbol __ZNK6MatrixIfE10upsample2xEv in:
    /.../OCRDemo-eggnlcolcwqycjagwvwddpfwgzlb/Build/Intermediates/OCRDemo.build/Release-iphoneos/OCRDemo.build/Objects-normal/armv7/A.o
    /.../OCRDemo-eggnlcolcwqycjagwvwddpfwgzlb/Build/Intermediates/OCRDemo.build/Release-iphoneos/OCRDemo.build/Objects-normal/armv7/C.o
duplicate symbol __ZNK6MatrixIfE10upsample2xEv in:
    /.../OCRDemo-eggnlcolcwqycjagwvwddpfwgzlb/Build/Intermediates/OCRDemo.build/Release-iphoneos/OCRDemo.build/Objects-normal/armv7/A.o
    /.../OCRDemo-eggnlcolcwqycjagwvwddpfwgzlb/Build/Intermediates/OCRDemo.build/Release-iphoneos/OCRDemo.build/Objects-normal/armv7/D.o

The funny thing is that both methods are used in these files, however the linker only complains about upsample2x... The only difference between the two, from a syntactic point of view is the number of arguments: the threshold has an argument of T, while the upsample2x requires none - besides this, both are defined as const, both return matrices etc.

So my question is: what causes this cryptic error, and how can I fix it?

share|improve this question
    
Don't define template members in a .cpp, it will do you no good. –  Arne Mertz Aug 29 '13 at 12:19
    
The .cpp file is only for separating the implementation from the header, avoiding a monolithic 1000-line header file. Otherwise, the .cpp is included in the header, so the compiler should paste it's contents there. Anyway, I've replaced the include directive with the contents of the .cpp, but the results remained the same. (I know that you can't separate template declaration and implementation like you do for regular C++ classes, but it's not the case here.) –  Tamás Zahola Aug 29 '13 at 12:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your error is twofold. First of all you write template code in a .cpp file. Then, to correct that error, you include the .cpp file in a header, another bad idea.

Why?

A class template is not really a class, yet, just a template for a group of classes. The classes that can be made from it are created as needed. A .cpp file, on the other hand, is only compiled once, which is not enough and not even meaningful, since you only have a template at this point.

On the other hand, to include a .cpp file is a bad thing in itself, since it typically results in recompilation of code that may not be recompiled, hence the link errors.

EDIT: Either you can define the specializations in a .cpp file (but no pure template code, and don't include it!), or you can inline them and keep them in the header:

#if USE_NEON_UPSAMPLING2X
template<> inline Matrix<float> Matrix<float>::upsample2x() const{
   ... // specialized for ARM NEON float32_t
}
#endif

#if USE_NEON_THRESHOLD
template<> inline Matrix<float> Matrix<float>::threshold(float thresholdValue)const{
   ... // specialized for ARM NEON float32_t
}
share|improve this answer
    
Okay, but the same problem persists when I replace the include directive with the contents of the cpp file (and get rid of the cpp completely). –  Tamás Zahola Aug 29 '13 at 13:23
    
Updated my answer. Hope it helps! –  Naffnuff Aug 29 '13 at 14:12
    
It works! Cool, although I have no idea why :S I thought "inline" was a hint for the compiler to eliminate the push/pop overhead by inlining certain methods. What's the difference in this usage of "inline"? –  Tamás Zahola Aug 29 '13 at 14:53
    
In this case it eliminates ODR violations - it is allowed to have multiple definitions of a function only if it is inlined (and of non-specialized function templates of course). –  Arne Mertz Aug 29 '13 at 15:24
1  
It is the same thing. Inlining means the function is never compiled as a function, because its body is pasted everywhere it's used (inlined). Since the function is never compiled, you get rid of the link errors you get by multiple compilations of the same function. –  Naffnuff Aug 29 '13 at 15:26

Add inline to your definitions.

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