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#post

The names of my variables are not imporant! This code will be deleted when it works!

#post

Alright, so I'm using fread in stdio.h to read a text file. The problem is that I keep reading random bytes that don't exist in the text file from my knowledge. I'm assuming they are part of files scheme, but I just wanna make sure it's not my code.

#include "stdafx.h"
#ifdef WIN32
    #include <io.h>
#else
    #include <sys/io.h>
#endif
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <stdio.h>

#include "n_script_timer.h"
//using namespace std;

#ifdef _INC_WCHAR
    typedef wchar_t CHR;
#else
    typedef char CHR;
#endif
int _tmain(int argc, CHR* argv[])
{
    #ifndef _DEBUG
        if(argc == 1)
        {
            printf("You must drag a file onto this program to run it.");
            scanf("%*c");
            return 0;
        }
        CHR* fname = argv[1];
    #else
        #ifdef _INC_WCHAR
            const CHR fname[16] = L"f:\\deleteme.bin";
        #else
            const CHR fname[16] = "f:\\deleteme.bin";
        #endif
    #endif

    FILE* inFile;
    long len;
    struct Script_Timer a;
    //static const int bsize = 4096*6;
    static const int bsize = 84;
    typedef CHR chhh[bsize];
    int alen;
    printf("#Opening File '%s' ...\n",fname);
    #ifdef _INC_WCHAR
        if((inFile = _wfopen(fname,L"rb")) == NULL)
    #else
        if((inFile = fopen(fname,"r")) == NULL)
    #endif
    {
    	printf("Error opening file '%s' ",fname);
    	return 0;
    }
    fseek(inFile,SEEK_SET,0);
    #ifdef _WIN32
        len = _filelength( inFile->_file );
    #else
        len = _filelength(inFile->_fileno);
    #endif
    printf("  !FileLength: %d\n",len);
    printf("#Creating Buffers...\n");
    if(((float)len/(float)bsize) > (len/bsize))
    {
    	alen = (len/bsize) + 1;
    }
    else alen = (len/bsize);
    #ifdef WIN32
    	//chhh *cha = new chhh[alen];
    	chhh cha[alen];
    #else
    	chhh cha[alen];
    #endif
    printf("#Reading File...\n");
    Start_ST(&a);
    int i = 0;
    for(i=0;i<alen;++i)
    {
    	fread(&cha[i],sizeof(CHR),bsize,inFile);
    	printf("[%i]%s",i,cha[i]);
    }
    End_ST(&a);
    fclose(inFile);
    printf("Characters per millisecond: %f \n",((float)len/a.milliseconds));
    printf("Characters per second: %f \n",((float)len/a.milliseconds) * 1000);
    scanf("%*c");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
3  
Two comments: isn't TCHAR the standard char/wchar_t switch on windows? (also: typedef std::basic_string<TCHAR> tstring;), and when you define a char array from a string literal, let the literal determine the size (TCHAR const fname[] = _T("f:/deleteme.bin");). msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dybsewaf(VS.80).aspx –  Roger Pate Dec 5 '09 at 4:35
1  
Why is your code littered with disgusting #ifdefs for ANSI/Unicode strings? You don't need to reinvent the wheel -- Windows already provides the TCHAR data type (maps to char or wchar_t depending on if UNICODE is defined), the TEXT and _T macros for creating string constants, and a huge library of macros such as _tfopen() that map to their ANSI/Unicode equivalents as appropriate. –  Adam Rosenfield Dec 5 '09 at 4:37
    
Actually _TCHAR is being defined as a wchar_t in tchar.h –  kelton52 Dec 5 '09 at 4:39
    
windows has ya, but those headers don't exist on unix systems, at least the ones I use. –  kelton52 Dec 5 '09 at 4:40
1  
The name of your variables is important - they make your code harder to understand. ..... @kelton52: depends on UNICODE being #defined –  peterchen Dec 5 '09 at 5:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

A couple of weird things here:

int i = 0;
for(i=0;i<alen;++i)
{
   fread(&cha[i],sizeof(CHR),bsize,inFile);
   printf("[%i]%s",i,cha[i]);
}
  1. You don't null terminate the buffer before printing it (as RageZ pointed out).

  2. You increment i on each loop repetition, but every time you read 84 chars (bsize) into &cha[i]. I think this should mean you're only seeing every 84th character.

Also, if I were you I'd be checking the return value of fread every time. It's not guaranteed to always return the number of bytes you're expecting.


EDIT: The size of the block you're reading is fine. I got confused for a minute by the typedef. Every time you increment i by 1, it advances the pointer by 84*sizeof(CHR), as you intended. Still, you can't guarantee that it read the number of bytes that you think it did. If it came up short then you'll be left with junk in the buffer: say it read 60 chars, that leaves 24 junk chars before the insertion point for the next read.

share|improve this answer
    
Why wouldn't it return the right number of bytes, do I end up losing information then, or is it picked up on the next pass? –  kelton52 Dec 5 '09 at 4:31
    
The file pointer is advanced, but the target buffer pointer isn't. –  peterchen Dec 5 '09 at 5:05
1  
You will get the subsequent characters in the next read (assuming there wasn't an error in the stream), but you won't be inserting them at the right spot in your buffer. Currently you assume that your read always gets 84 CHR's, so you always advance your pointer 84 chars ahead. Instead, check how many CHR's were read and advance by that many. –  Nate C-K Dec 5 '09 at 5:50
typedef CHR chhh[bsize];

but

fread(&cha[i], sizeof(CHR), bsize, inFile);

In C++, you need an extra byte for the '\0' at the end of a string.

share|improve this answer

the cha buffer should be filled with null (0) before or you gonna you going to get some garbage.

printf("[%i]%s",i,cha[i]);

Like printf is outputing to screen until it meets NULL, so in the best case you are going to have some garbage, worst some access violation because you access memory that you don't own.

Note: I advise you to give meaningful name to your variable/typedef etc like chhh is not really nice. It would be a pain in few month even for you to modify such code!

share|improve this answer
    
The vs compiler doesn't like assigning dynamically assigned arrays, but the GNU compiler has no problem with it? Not sure why though. It didn't however let me dynamically size a 2d array, that's why I went the long route with the typedef and whatnot. –  kelton52 Dec 5 '09 at 4:11
    
GCC has had that as an extension for a while now. It's also part of C99. –  Nate C-K Dec 5 '09 at 4:11
    
oky, I am not really on top last C standard. –  RageZ Dec 5 '09 at 4:14
    
It is true that you can't rely on it yet if you want to be portable, since some compilers haven't implemented support for it yet. I've read recommendations that you should prefer alloca instead as it has wider support and also does more error checking. –  Nate C-K Dec 5 '09 at 4:17

Note, your alen calculation is going to be wrong if you're using the wchar_t code path because bsize is the element count for the array, not its size in bytes.

I would suggest you try changing your variable names to accurately describe what they mean, you'll find it much easier to spot errors if you do.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that crossed my mind, but I didn't pay it much attention. –  kelton52 Dec 5 '09 at 4:37

You may also have buffer overrun errors.

int i = 0;
for(i=0;i {
fread(&cha[i],sizeof(CHR),bsize,inFile);
printf("[%i]%s",i,cha[i]);
}

In the above loop, you are reading a quantity of bsize at each position in the cha array. Unless bsize is one, you will have buffer overflow problems and the data in the array will not match the data in the file.

With Unicode, I don't think you can use binary I/O. Because Unicode uses more than one byte for representing characters, you run into byte ordering issues (Big Endian vs. Little Endian). If your machine architecture has the same Endianess as the Unicode specification, you will have no problems. But if the program is run on a different architecture...

As others have stated, don't develop specific code to handle the switching between Unicode and ASCII (8-bit). Look in the compiler manual and use methods that will operate on either Unicode or ASCII, depending on the compiler switch. Only write new code when the compiler or OS doesn't have the functionality you need. In this case, you need an fread that will operate on either; but definitely not fread.

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