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i trying to transform my matrix with 4 columns to a matrix with 1 column like the example:

I tried the code, but the values appear in a list, and i want values that i can do some operations!

f.con <- matrix (c(ex), 
                 ncol=1, byrow=TRUE)

Initial matrix (ex)

0   3   2
0   2   1
0   1   1



Final matrix with 1 colunm:

0
0
0
3
2
1
2
1
1
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1  
You should accept one of the answers that solve your problem by clicking on the tick mark in the left. Doing the same in your other questions would increase your chances to get (good) answers in your future questions as well. –  Julius Aug 29 '13 at 17:08

3 Answers 3

Here are a couple of possibilities:

dim(m) <- c(length(m), 1)
# or
m <- matrix(m, ncol = 1)

the latter approach, however, is slower.

# As I understand, the reason this is fast is that it
# literally transforms the matrix 
m <- matrix(0:1, ncol = 10000, nrow = 10000)
system.time(dim(m) <- c(length(m), 1))
#   user  system elapsed 
#      0       0       0 

m <- matrix(0:1, ncol = 10000, nrow = 10000)
# Whereas here a copy is being made
system.time(m2 <- matrix(m, ncol = 1))
#   user  system elapsed 
#   0.45    0.16    0.61 

# And here a long vector is needed first
system.time(m3 <- as.matrix(c(m)))
Error: cannot allocate vector of size 381.5 Mb
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ok, this is a simple example, and if i import a big matrix with another values, like use one object in a place of 0! –  Forstools Aug 29 '13 at 12:22
    
this appear with a single list with pairs of values! [,1] [1,] Integer,2 [2,] Integer,2 [3,] Integer,2 [4,] Integer,2 –  Forstools Aug 29 '13 at 12:32
    
@Forstools, it will still work with different values and larger matrices. But you should use the first approach since it is faster. There should be no problems. Add dput(ex) or dput(f.con) to your question so that we can see what is going on. Notice that you do not have to change 1 to anything else. –  Julius Aug 29 '13 at 12:40

Could you not just work with a vector instead of a one column matrix?

as.vector( m )
#[1] 0 0 0 3 2 1 2 1 1

I can't off-hand think of operations in R that would work with a one-column matrix but not a vector of the same length.

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Another alternative:

> mat <- matrix(c(0,0,0,3,2,1,2,1,1), 3) # your matrix
> as.matrix(c(mat))  # the disired output
      [,1]
 [1,]    0
 [2,]    0
 [3,]    0
 [4,]    3
 [5,]    2
 [6,]    1
 [7,]    2
 [8,]    1
 [9,]    1

Note that you are looking for the implementation of the vec operator which is already implemented in R under the functions c(·) and as.vector(·), both of them will give a vector, if you really want one-column matrix, then just write as.matrix(c(·)) or as.matrix(as.vector(·)) this will work for any matrix size.

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> i got this error: dim(m) <- c(length(ex),4) Error in dim(m) <- c(length(ex), 4) : dims [product 16] do not match the length of object [4] –  Forstools Aug 29 '13 at 12:36
    
are you sure this comment is for me?? I got not error –  Jilber Aug 29 '13 at 12:38
4  
@Forstools, please check your data carefully. Several people are spending their time trying to help you. I don't think it is fair that they should spend additional time replying on your error messages, that apparently have nothing to do with the answers kindly provided. Furthermore, I don't find it very sensible to change your input data while people are answering your question on the original dummy data. –  Henrik Aug 29 '13 at 12:43

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