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I have this situation. I'm using bootstrap and jquery-ui in my application, included in this way:

<link href="bootstrap.min.css" rel="stylesheet" media="screen"/>
<link href="jquery-ui.css" rel="stylesheet" media="screen"/>
<!-- My custom stylesheet -->
<link href="style/style.css" rel="stylesheet" media="screen"/>

When use jquery-ui for open a modal window, I realized that the content has it's "own" font-family and font-size, because of this rules:

.ui-widget input, 
.ui-widget select, 
.ui-widget textarea, 
.ui-widget button {
    font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif/*{ffDefault}*/;
    font-size: 1em;
}

When debugging in Chrome (F12) I can "disable" this rules and gets the expected result. But I can't figure out how to do it in my custom stylesheet. I know that this would do the trick:

.ui-widget input, 
.ui-widget select, 
.ui-widget textarea, 
.ui-widget button {
    font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
    font-size: 14px;
}

Or I can comment out the rules in the jquery-ui.css file. But I was looking for a way that, if later I decide to change the "base" font, I could make the change in one single place and don't modify the jquery-ui and bootstrap css files How can achieve this? How does the mechanism to "disable" rules in Chrome works?

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By Disable, do you mean commenting? –  Nathan Lee Aug 29 '13 at 12:43
5  
The disabling of styles in chrome devTools is done via Javascript not CSS –  Connor Aug 29 '13 at 12:45
    
@NathanLee I've updated my post. I don't want to modify the jquery or bootstrap files. –  Agustin Meriles Aug 29 '13 at 12:46
    
@Pinocchio Thanks. That's valuable answer. It's posible to reset the rules via CSS? –  Agustin Meriles Aug 29 '13 at 12:47
    
you can always override the plugin css in your own css file since you are calling it after the plugin css. You can just copy and paste your second block of code and put it in your own style sheet, it will probably do the trick –  Huangism Aug 29 '13 at 12:48
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3 Answers

Simply all you have to do is place the same code in your own stylesheet. like this

.ui-widget input, 
.ui-widget select, 
.ui-widget textarea, 
.ui-widget button {
    font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
    font-size: 14px;
}

And it will over-ride the default styles, as long as your custom CSS file is linked after the jQuery UI CSS.

Then you can change it whenever you please.

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We link only our custom override CSS file <someproject>-ui.css in the page and @import url("jquery-ui.css") as the first thing in our ui stylesheet. Never have to worry about the order or that you got both. –  Stephen P Nov 19 '13 at 21:03
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The feature in Chrome is a debugging feature, with no "reallife" counterpart.

What you need to do is establish which values should take precedence over the rest. You would do this by altering the order of your CSS files (adding bootstrap.min.css after the jquery-ui would make it's rules supersede the jquery-ui's), adding rules of your own to overwrite everyone else's.

As a warning, I would advice against using both jquery-ui and bootstrap CSS's - they both want to be fairly complete for what the respective frameworks do, and mey result in a whole lot of overlapping.

Also, if you want real control over the base CSS (rather than introducing overrides) try to use the LESS (or SASS port) version of the bootstrap framework - you could then just store things like your font selection in a variable, and changing it would change the font everywherer you would be using it!

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In this case, changing the order of stylesheets wouldn't help, because Bootstrap doesn't define .ui-*. The less suggestion is good though. More developers should be building the less/sass, otherwise you end up with a very common 95% of Bootstrap and jQuery UI being unused. Also, the two projects could be merged together to use a single variables file. –  FakeRainBrigand Aug 29 '13 at 13:07
    
Yup, although like you, I think using one is more than enough! –  Tiago Roldão Aug 29 '13 at 13:11
    
I'll will stick to Bootstrap then. Thanks for your answer –  Agustin Meriles Aug 29 '13 at 13:19
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The best solution is to stick with one stylesheet, and one framework. jQuery UI and Bootstrap don't play nice together in most cases, and I recommend using Bootstrap modal. Then the styles will be consistent everywhere.


An alternative is to edit jQuery UI's stylesheet and simply delete those lines. If it's minified, use a text editor with word wrapping and find/search functionality (any decent editor). I see you don't want to do that, though.


With these restrictions, your best choice is to ask for it to inherit the styles.

.ui-widget input, 
.ui-widget select, 
.ui-widget textarea, 
.ui-widget button {
    font-family: inherit;
    font-size: inherit;
}

By placing this below the other stylesheets, it will override jQuery UI's styles for the elements, and instead take the style of their closest parent, for example the font Bootstrap sets on the body element:

font-family: "Helvetica Neue", Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
font-size: 14px;
line-height: 1.428571429;
color: #333333;
background-color: #ffffff;
share|improve this answer
    
if the css are minified, use an online tool to format it –  Huangism Aug 29 '13 at 12:52
    
@Huangism, then you also need to minify it again. It's much easier to just Ctrl-F for the font names, and remove those rules. I understand that it might have been unclear, so I edited it. I didn't mean to just scroll until you see it :-) –  FakeRainBrigand Aug 29 '13 at 12:56
    
Yea but the OP is a beginner it would be hard for him to find the rules while minified. As a matter of fact, maybe he should keep everything unminified until he is ready for production server –  Huangism Aug 29 '13 at 12:58
    
@Huangism, I agree. –  FakeRainBrigand Aug 29 '13 at 13:03
    
Yeap, I'm using the unminified versions until production. That's not a problem –  Agustin Meriles Aug 29 '13 at 13:10
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