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My colleague was trying to write a method (In Java/C#) that would append an arbitrary number of zero's to the end of a String. However, I can't seem to figure out what his approach is.

This is the Java code, the C# is basically equivalent:

String appendzeros(int input, int no_of_digits_required)
{
    String result = Integer.toString(input);
    int i,j;

    for(i = 10, j = 1; i <= Math.pow(10, no_of_digits_required-1); i = i*10, j++)
    {
        if(input / i == 0)
        {
            for(int k = 1; k <= no_of_digits_required-j; k++)
                result = "0" + result;

            break;
        }                    
    } 

    return result;
}

Any ideas?

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closed as off-topic by musefan, Liam, Beryllium, EdChum, G Gordon Worley III Aug 29 '13 at 20:54

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3  
What can't you figure out? The code is right there –  musefan Aug 29 '13 at 13:32
1  
Or why don't you just tell him to stop being a madhead. This could be done so much simpler –  musefan Aug 29 '13 at 13:33
4  
Btw, in C# it can be simplified to input.PadRight(no_of_digits_required, '0'); –  Tim Schmelter Aug 29 '13 at 13:34
1  
C89-like scoping of iteration variables, an extremely idiomatic way to do what could be written in 4 simple lines... Yeah, I don't think your colleague is very competent. It's not a bad question, but you won't gain anything from understanding the specifics of this approach. –  Theodoros Chatzigiannakis Aug 29 '13 at 13:34
3  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is asking about what a piece of code does. –  Liam Aug 29 '13 at 13:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The basic idea of the code is to count how many digits there are in the stringified number, and then add the "padding" zeroes.

Now let's see how...

String result = Integer.toString(input);

Initial stringification of the number (5 => "5")

for(i = 10, j = 1; i <= Math.pow(10, no_of_digits_required-1); i = i*10, j++)

i will contain powers of 10 (10, 100, 1000, 10000, 100000....) We know that we can stop at 10^(no_of_digits_required-1). Why? We will see it later! j is the number of digits of the input (it's a counter, we know that it has at least a digit, because even 0 is composed by a digit)

if(input / i == 0)

Don't look at what you see... Think this: it means: the first time i is greater than input. This because we are using integer division, so any number / any smaller number >= 1, while any number / the same number == 1 and any number / a greater number == 0. (the first time because in the if there is a break, so after the first time, the for cycle will end)

for(int k = 1; k <= no_of_digits_required-j; k++)
    result = "0" + result;

In j we had the number of digits of our number, so no_of_digits_required-j is the number of 0 padding we need. He is using a 1 <= k <= no_of_digits_required-j, so base 1, instead of the more classical 0 <= k < no_of_digits_required-j (base 0)

break;

We are still inside the if. The first time we find how many digits are in our number, we pad it and then we have the "correct" result and we break from the "main" for.

Now the only interesting question is why the Math.pow(10, no_of_digits_required-1). The response is easy: if you ask for no_of_digits_required == 1, then the cycle is useless, because you won't ever need padding. i = 10, i <= 10^(1-1) => i <= 1, no for cycle. With no_of_digits_required == 2 we have i = 10, i <= 10^(2-1) => i <= 10, so a single cycle. This is ok, because we have to pad the number only if it's < 10 (so 0...9). The if (input / i == 0) will in fact "activate" only for input in the range 0...9... And so on.

I think your ex-colleague is ready for Obfuscated C competitions!

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1  
Well done on the explanation! I tried to get my head around it, but the stupidity of it all made me angry and I couldn't focus. Now I have to spend 20 minutes straightening out the beer can I had to crush, not to mention paying for my neighbors hip replacement, poor thing –  musefan Aug 29 '13 at 14:30
    
Excellent explanation! –  crocboy Aug 29 '13 at 18:28

Whenever I have these WTF moments with code I find hand execution usually helps figure out what is going on. So here goes appendzeros(3, 3)

result = "3"

i = 10

j = 1

10 <= 100 so run for loop body

if 3 / 10 == 0 (integer division so true)

for k = 1; k <= 2

result = "0" + result

k =2; k <= 2

result = "0"+ result

inner for loop done back to outer for loop

i = 100

j = 2

100 <= 100 so run loop body

if 3 / 100 == 0 true run inner for loop

k = 1

1 <= 1

result = "0" + result

and done "0003"

i, and j both track the same thing(how many digits wide the result is) just in different "number spaces" i tracks it by being that wide in decimal, while j tracks it by counting powers of 10. The if inside the loop gets you to the right power of 10 to start adding zeros.

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as I see it,it will insert "0" only if input is 0, and it will add 0 as asked. this could have been written much better

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2  
This answer is more confusing than the question –  musefan Aug 29 '13 at 13:42
1  
@musefan Obviously the zero input will insert 0 into the insert, obviously only when zero is asked...gawwwddddd! –  Liam Aug 29 '13 at 13:52
    
@Liam: Ah, when you put it like that... –  musefan Aug 29 '13 at 13:53

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