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Say if I have a dropdown in a form and I have another nested class inside of this class . Now what's the best way to access this dropdown from the nested class?

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Please elaborate. Examples would be very nice. –  Craig Oct 8 '08 at 22:15
    
Learner, I have added the nestedclasses tag to your question as there is a "When should I use nested classes" question with that tag and it makes sense to group these two closer than simply using a C# tag! –  Ray Hayes Oct 8 '08 at 22:46
    
The prospect of being able to do this (with a standard syntax) is quite interesting... sort of like closures in behaviour. No doubt, such a feature would be abused until it was an anti-pattern, if it existed =( –  Sprague Jul 8 '13 at 14:20

6 Answers 6

Unlike Java, a nested class isn't a special "inner class" so you'd need to pass a reference. Raymond Chen has an example describing the differences here : C# nested classes are like C++ nested classes, not Java inner classes.

Here is an example where the constructor of the nested class is passed the instance of the outer class for later reference.

// C#
class OuterClass 
{
    string s;
    // ...
    class InnerClass 
    {
       OuterClass o_;
       public InnerClass(OuterClass o) { o_ = o; }
       public string GetOuterString() { return o_.s; }
    }
    void SomeFunction() {
        InnerClass i = new InnerClass(this);
        i.GetOuterString();
    }

}

Note that the InnerClass can access the "s" of the OuterClass, I didn't modify Raymond's code (as I linked to above), so remember that the "string s;" is private because no other access permission was specified.

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Nested types aren't like inner classes in Java - there's no inherent instance of the containing type. (They're more like static nested classes in Java.) They're effectively separate classes, with two distinctions:

  • If the containing type is generic, the nested type is effectively parameterised by the containing type, e.g. Outer<int>.Nested isn't the same as Outer<string>.Nested.
  • Nested types have access to private members in the containing type.
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Unlike Java, in C# there is no implicit reference to an instance of the enclosing class.

You need to pass such a reference to the nested class. A typical way to do this is through the nested class's constructor.

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    private Nested m_Nested;

    public Form1()
    {
    	InitializeComponent();

    	m_Nested = new Nested(this);
    	m_Nested.Test();
    }

    private class Nested
    {
    	private Form1 m_Parent;

    	protected Form1 Parent
    	{
    		get
    		{
    			return m_Parent;
    		}
    	}

    	public Nested(Form1 parent)
    	{
    		m_Parent = parent;
    	}

    	public void Test()
    	{
    		this.Parent.textBox1.Text = "Testing access to parent Form's control";
    	}
    }
}
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Correct me if I am wrong, you are trying to process the outer control from inner class hence you ran into this. A better way of doing this would be to handle affairs in a event driven fashion. Use an Observer pattern, Register a listener on the outer control (your nested/inner class will be the listener). Makes life simpler. I am afraid that this is not the answer you were expecting!

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You could pass the enclosing class as a parameter to the nested class constructor, like this:

private NestedClass _nestedClass;
public ParentClass() 
{
   _nestedClass = new NestedClass(this);
}

Nested classes are generally not recommended and should be private and/or internal. They are, in my opinion, useful sometimes though.

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One other method, which is useful under certain circumstances, is to derive the nested class off of the outer class. Like so:

class Outer()
{
    protected int outerVar;
    class Nested() : Outer
    {
        //can access outerVar here, without the need for a 
        // reference variable (or the associated dot notation).
    }
}

I used this technique especially in the context of Structured Unit Tests. (This may not apply to the OP's particular question, but it can be helpuf with nested classes in general, as in the case of this "duplicate" question: " Can i access outer class objects in inner class ")

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