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I am tyring to implement a python program, using Twisted, to communicate witha bluetooth device. The following is a sample code of what I have implemented:

from twisted.internet import protocol, reactor
from twisted.internet.serialport import SerialPort
from twisted.protocols import basic

class DeviceBluetooth(basic.Int16StringReceiver):

    def connectionMade(self):
        print 'Connection made!'
        self.sendString('[01] help\n')

    def dataReceived(self, data):
        print"Response: {0}".format(data)

        print "-----"
        print "choose message to send: "
        print "1. Stim on"
        print "2. Stim off"
        print "3. Stim status"
        print "4. Help"
        # user input
        ch = input("Choose command :: ")
        if int(ch) == 1:
            self.sendString('[02] stim on\n')
        elif int(ch) == 2:
            self.sendString('[03] stim off\n')
        elif int(ch) == 3:
            self.sendString('[04] stim ?\n')
        elif int(ch) == 4:
            self.sendString('[05] help\n')
        else:
            reactor.stop()

SerialPort(DeviceBluetooth(), 'COM20', reactor, baudrate=115200)
reactor.run()

When I run the program, sometimes I get a response and other times I do not receive anything. And most of the times long responses are fragmented appear as part of the next message. I have through the hyperterminal to make sure that I get the appropriate response from by bluetooth device. So, the problem has to be with my code.

Is there something that I doing wrong in my code?


Additional modification/correction

When I replace dataReceived() function in the above code by stringReceived(), the program never enters this function.

I also tried to above program with the LineReceiver protocol, as the following:

from twisted.internet import protocol, reactor
from twisted.internet.serialport import SerialPort
from twisted.protocols import basic

class DeviceBluetooth(basic.LineReceiver):

    def connectionMade(self):
        print 'Connection made!'
        self.sendLine('[01] help')

    def dataReceived(self, data):
        print"Response: {0}".format(data)

        print "-----"
        print "choose message to send: "
        print "1. Stim on"
        print "2. Stim off"
        print "3. Stim status"
        print "4. Help"
        # user input
        ch = input("Choose command :: ")
        if int(ch) == 1:
            self.sendLine('[02] stim on')
        elif int(ch) == 2:
            self.sendLine('[03] stim off')
        elif int(ch) == 3:
            self.sendLine('[04] stim ?')
        elif int(ch) == 4:
            self.sendLine('[05] help')
        else:
            reactor.stop()

SerialPort(DeviceBluetooth(), 'COM20', reactor, baudrate=115200)
reactor.run()

I have the same problem, as before, with fragmented data from the dataReceived function.

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2 Answers 2

Your protocol subclasses Int16StringReceiver which implements message framing using two byte (16 bit) length prefixes. However, it overrides dataReceived which is the method that implements that framing. This disables the framing and just delivers whatever bytes happen to be read from the connection - in whatever size they happen to be read.

When you subclass Int16StringReceiver, you're meant to override stringReceived instead.

share|improve this answer
    
I replaced thye dataReceived function by stringReceived, and ran the code. But when I do this, the program does not even enter the stringReceived function. I also tried a modified version of the programs above with LineReceived protcol, and here too I have the same problem of fragmented data from the dataReceived function. –  siva82kb Aug 29 '13 at 16:18
    
Why are you switching between Int16StringReceiver and LineReceiver? What protocol are you trying to speak here? –  Jean-Paul Calderone Aug 30 '13 at 1:06
    
I tried the LineReceiver protocol as just wanted to see if it worked. The protocol from the bluetooth device is implemented as a line based protocol. I am new to Twisted and so was trying out different things. –  siva82kb Aug 30 '13 at 20:17

For most of my bluetooth work, I've used 8-bit integers, so I would recommend using Int8StringReceiver. The LineReceiver protocol waits for an endline sequence which defaults to '\r\n' (and the bluetooth radios I use return '\r') so a mismatch on endline sequence would prevent the code from ever entering.

Have you tried to use a non-Twisted library for debugging? I highly recommend Twisted especially for production environments, but PySerial is a great way to poll serial data. (easy_install pyserial should do the trick.) Try this code:

import serial
s = serial.Serial('COM20', 115200, timeout=0)
data = s.read(1024)
print repr(data)

Make sure to use timeout=0 since that will make your read non-blocking. This will allow you to examine exactly what kind of data is being outputted by the bluetooth radio.

Finally, depending on what kind of bluetooth radio you are using, Windows might decide to move COM20 around, especially if you are using a USB-connected radio.

share|improve this answer
    
It occurs to me that you might be relying on the LineReceiver behavior to make sure your data appears non-fragmented. In that case, use pyserial to see what delimiter it is sending and then set it by writing: delimiter = '\n' right after the class line. Example –  DrRobotNinja Aug 29 '13 at 17:05
    
Thank you. I have decided to implement using the serial module, with separate threads for reading and writing, as this will be part of a larger application with a GUI. I am able to read and write without any problem. –  siva82kb Aug 30 '13 at 20:15
2  
Switching from Twisted to threads in order to fix framing problems in your interaction with the serial device probably just means you hid the bug so that it won't show up until the code is deployed in the real world where the timing is slightly different than your development machine and your code starts losing in various race conditions. –  Jean-Paul Calderone Sep 1 '13 at 14:51

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