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I am relatively new to threading, so I am unsure if I am going about this correctly.

In my current application, I have a multi-tabbed navigational form, some of which have buttons that lead to other forms, some of which have tables, and some of which have both. On one such, I have a button to add an entry, and a table showing all entries for that day pulled via stored procedure.

When I opened that second form as a dialog, it was easy to refresh the table by calling the method I had created... however, it ran slow like that. Instead, I started calling it as another thread, which runs incredibly fast, but I can't seem to find a way to call the method when the thread ends. I've searched for a while, and I've not found a working solution.

Here is the code:

public static void ThreadProcAddEntry()
    {
        Application.Run(new AddEntry());
    }

    private void btnAdd_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        System.Threading.Thread t = new Thread(new ThreadStart(ThreadProcAddEntry));
        t.Name = "AddEntry";
        t.Start();           
    }

and

public void GetMyEntries(string username)
    {
        using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["DB2"].ConnectionString))
        {
            using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("SP_GetUserEntries", conn))
            {
                cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
                cmd.Parameters.Add("@UserID", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = username;
                conn.Open();
                cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
                SqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader();

                using (reader)
                {
                    DataTable table = new DataTable();
                    table.Load(reader);
                    dgvMyEntry.DataSource = table;
                    dgvMyEntry.AllowUserToAddRows = false;
                    dgvMyEntry.ReadOnly = true;
                    dgvMyEntry.AutoResizeColumns();
                    dgvMyEntry.AutoSizeColumnsMode = DataGridViewAutoSizeColumnsMode.Fill;
                }
            }
        }

    }

How would you suggest I run the GetMyEntries Method when the thread ends, which occurs as soon as I click the Submit button on the AddEntryForm (which, after submitting to SQL, runs a dispose method)?

share|improve this question
    
Use a BackgroundWorker instead of a thread for this. It has a event called RunWorkerCompleted that does exactly what you are looking for. –  Scott Chamberlain Aug 29 '13 at 14:44
1  
Also you are making a few odd choices like using(reader) instead of using(SqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader()) –  Scott Chamberlain Aug 29 '13 at 14:45
    
Scott, thank you. I am still learning, and am not always the most effecient in coding. The using re-statement worked perfect as well. –  Kveld Ulf Aug 29 '13 at 18:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would suggest using tasks, as follows:

await Task
    .Run(() => ThreadProcAddEntry())
    .ContinueWith(task => GetMyEntries(username));

This is more succinct and readable than using raw Threads or background workers.

GetMyEntries will be run as soon as ThreadProcAddEntry completes.

More on the Task Parallel Library (async/await): http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/hh191443.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. This worked rather well for me. –  Kveld Ulf Aug 29 '13 at 18:06

You can use, another wrapper method/interface provided by .NET framework. That is BackgroundWorker. For more information check msnd http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc221403(v=vs.95).aspx

var backgroundWorker = new BackgroundWorker();

// define the event handlers
backgroundWorker.DoWork += (sender, args) => {
    // do your lengthy stuff here -- this will happen in a separate thread
    ...
}
backgroundWorker.RunWorkerCompleted += (sender, args) => {
    if (args.Error != null)  // if an exception occurred during DoWork,
        MessageBox.Show(args.Error.ToString());  // do your error handling here

    // Do whatever else you want to do after the work completed.
    // This happens in the main UI thread.
    ...
}

backgroundWorker.RunWorkerAsync(); // starts the background worker
share|improve this answer

I would use a task

var task = Task.Run(() => ThreadProcAddEntry());

task.GetAwaiter().OnCompleted(() => GetMyEntries(username));
share|improve this answer

Are you able to simply call GetMyEntries() after Application.Run(new AddEntry()); ?

If it is not in scope, then I'm afraid we need more detail of your architecture.

share|improve this answer

Rather than using a raw Thread, you could use one of the helpful thread-wrapping classes .net provides. Specifically, this sounds like a perfect job for a BackgroundWorker. You would create a new BackgroundWorker, add the code you want to run in the thread to the BackgroundWorker's DoWork event, add GetMyEntries to the BackgroundWorker's RunWorkerCompleted event, then call RunWorkerAsync().

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