Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

lets make it simple: normally update() is executed by multiple threads. once this is true if(!isSplit && users.size() >= Constants.SPLIT_THRESHOLD) i want that no one is executiong the update() method when the split() functions is celled.

public class Cell {
    private ConcurrentHashMap<Integer, User> users;
    private ConcurrentHashMap<Long, Cell> subCells;
    private boolean isSplit;
    private Lock splitLock;

    public Set<Integer> update(User user){

        //code executed by 1 thread
        if(!isSplit && users.size() >= Constants.SPLIT_THRESHOLD)
        {
            splitLock.lock();
            {
                try
            {
                    split();
                    isSplit = true;
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
                finally
                {
                    splitLock.unlock();
                }
            }
        }

        // code executed by multiple threads
        // on users hashmap
    }
    private void merge(){}
    private void split(){}
}
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm not in a position to tell you if your code is currently getting the locking / synchronization correct.

However, under normal circumstances, I'd use a primitive object mutex for something like this:

private final Object splitLock = new Object();

// Use it like this ...
synchronized (splitLock) {
    split();
}

AFAIK, there is no performance advantage in using a ReentrantLock over a primitive object mutex. I'd only recommend using this class if you are going to make use of features that primitive object mutexes don't support;

share|improve this answer
    
Thx, i will keep in mind using this. But in this project i have to use a reentrant lock because i can test if the lock is aquired or not. –  Sasha Aug 31 '13 at 13:08
add comment

A general pattern, when locking for write/update, is to acquire the lock first, then check your conditions (that are modified by the write/update), then write.

lock
if(x) {
    write/update
}
unlock

Contrast that with this, which is analogous to the code you have posted:

if(x) {
    lock
    write/update
    unlock
}

x can evaluate to true for thread-1, meanwhile thread-2 executes a write/update causing x to evaluate to false, but thread-1 is already inside the condition, and will execute a write/update anyway. fail.

UPDATE: Responding to updated question.

Check out the javadoc for ReentrantReadWriteLock.

You probably want to isolate your split() method with a write lock (only one thread can acquire), and the remainder of your update method with a read lock (multiple threads can acquire, so long as no one has the write lock).

share|improve this answer
    
hi, if i lock the whole code in the update method() this code will be executed by 1 thread at time (anyway i simplified the question) –  Sasha Aug 29 '13 at 15:34
    
you are right, infact in my split method i check again if(isSplit) and return immidiatly if it is true. I dont use your first solution because i want that multiple threads can execute update() in particular the code under the first if. But when i split i want that only 1 thread is inside update(). –  Sasha Aug 29 '13 at 15:55
    
Updated answer. –  Keith Aug 29 '13 at 15:57
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.