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On edit.html.erb file, scaffold created, I don't see any code specified PUT method. How come the post form call update action with PUT method.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The form_for function will make its best guess in where to send the form:

Take the following code for instance:

<% form_for @user do |form| %>
  1. If @user is a new record, it will send a POST request to /users
  2. If @user is an existing record, it will send a PUT request to /users/12 (If 12 = @user.id)
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You can see put method on edit when you run

rake routes


new_account  GET    /account/new(.:format)  {:action=>"new", :controller=>"accounts"}
edit_account GET    /account/edit(.:format) {:action=>"edit", :controller=>"accounts"}
account      GET    /account(.:format)      {:action=>"show", :controller=>"accounts"}
             PUT    /account(.:format)      {:action=>"update", :controller=>"accounts"} //this is your method needed
             DELETE /account(.:format)      {:action=>"destroy", :controller=>"accounts"}
             POST   /account(.:format)      {:action=>"create", :controller=>"accounts"}

<% form_for @user do |form| %> can be <% form_for :user, :url => user_url(:user), :method => :put do |form| %>
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The standard Rails way to handle updates is to have an edit template (your edit.html.erb), which generates a form that is filled in by the user and then submitted as an HTTP PUT request. Your Rails app should have a model for the resource that is being updated, with a controller that has an 'update' action to accept the form parameters.

If you want to see the data that is being sent in the PUT request, you can use Firebug.

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