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I have a simple programa that populates a 2D dynamic char array. Allocation works as usual. My problem relies on freeing arrays. I'm using pure C on VC++ 2008.

This is the piece of code when I allocate and initializes my arrays:

char** messsages = (char**)malloc(5*sizeof(char*));
initValorArrayMsgs(messsages, 5);

insertMsgToArray(5, messsages , "Test message.");

void insertMsgToArray(int totalLines, char** msgsArray, const char* msgToInsert)
{
    int line = 0;
    int size= strlen(msgToInsert);

    for(; line < totalLines; line ++)
    {
        if(strlen(msgsArray[line ]) == 0)
        {
            msgsArray[line ] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char) * size);
            strcpy(msgsArray[line], msgToInsert);
            break;
        }
    }
}

And this is the code where I free my arrays

void freeArrayMsgs(char** arry, int lines)
{
    int i = 0;
    for(; i < lines; i++)
    {
        if(strlen(arry[i]) == 0){
            break;
        }
        free(arry[i]);
    }
    free(arry);
}

When program try to free the first array, it raises a Heap Corruption Exception.

Reading some posts on SO, I'm corretly freeing my array. So, why I'm getting the hep corruption exception?

share|improve this question
1  
msgsArray[line ] = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char) * size); needs to have (size+1) instead of size to accommodate the null terminator of the string. As a side note, why don't you put your loop initializers right in the for loop? For example, for ( i = 0; i < lines; i++ ) rather than doing the i = 0; separately and doing for ( ; i < lines; i++ )? –  lurker Aug 29 '13 at 15:14
1  
As well as the above bug, note that you should not cast the result of malloc in C. –  Paul R Aug 29 '13 at 15:15
1  
@learner: see stackoverflow.com/questions/605845/… –  Paul R Aug 29 '13 at 17:01
1  
Guys your replies were very helpful. –  learner Aug 29 '13 at 17:03
1  
@PaulR Very interesting resource. –  learner Aug 29 '13 at 17:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A couple things:

  • You need to malloc(size + 1) to fit the null-terminator.
  • There is no need to do sizeof(char)- sizeof is defined in terms of char, so that will always be 1.
  • You shouldn't cast the result of malloc - it is unnecessary and may hide problems.
  • As msgsArray is not initialized, there is no guarantee strlen(msgsArray[line]) == 0. In fact, it probably won't. Use calloc instead of malloc if you want this to be true.
  • In general, use strncpy instead of strcpy - it's safer.
  • Rather than using strlen, it would be a better idea to initialize the char*s to null and check for null. What if the first msgToInsert is an empty string, but the rest are real strings? Your code will exit the loop because strlen(msgs[0]) == 0, which checking for null instead would fix.
share|improve this answer
    
Solved, the heap corruption was occurring because I was missing to fit the null-terminator. Right to the point Matt. –  learner Aug 29 '13 at 17:02

Two things jump out at me:

  1. The inner logic of freeArrayMsgs seems suspect: On the first NULL pointer, it stops looping.

     for ( ;  i < lines;  i++)  
     {  
         if (strlen (arry[i]) == 0)  
             break;  
         free (arry[i]);  
     }
    

    Maybe that is okay, but if lines is the maximum ever used, it could be important to get them all. Note that it is perfectly fine to free even NULL pointers—doing so is a no-op.

  2. If the code reuses the pointers, it really ought to NULL them out after free(). If the same philosophy implied by the bit of code I see persists throughout the code, you are probably reusing a freed pointer because the stored pointer is not NULL. That is easily fixed:

    for ( ;  i < lines;  i++)  
    {  
        free (arry[i]);  
        arry[i] = NULL;  
    }
    
share|improve this answer
    
Why isn't code formatting working? Anyone know? –  wallyk Aug 29 '13 at 15:35
    
From a quick play it looks like SO doesn't like code formatting within list elements - I deleted your 1. and 2. and code formatting started working. –  Nigel Harper Aug 29 '13 at 15:42
    
@wallyk You just needed to add more indentation. –  Mark Hurd Aug 29 '13 at 15:47
    
@MarkHurd I've inserted break because I want to not delete anything but allocated memory. An ok, I forgot to put null after that. But the problem still there. –  learner Aug 29 '13 at 16:55
    
I only corrected the indentation to get the formatting to look right. You may want to @comment to others here. –  Mark Hurd Aug 30 '13 at 7:49

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