Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I spent some time to learn Python's property magic. But when I am writing a simple case with a small mistake, I get a strange result. Here is my code:

class PropertyShow(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.__num = 90 

    def setNum(self,value):
        self.__num = value

    def getNum(self):
        return self.__num

    def delNum(self):
        del self.__num

    #num = property(getNum,setNum,delNum)
    # I made a mistake here!
    __num = property(getNum,setNum,delNum)


class PropertyTwo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.__num = None

    @property
    def num(self):
        """OK, use a decorator, you can do something here!"""
        return self.__num

    @num.setter
    def num(self,value):
        self.__num = value

    @num.deleter
    def num(self):
        del self.__num

one = PropertyShow()
print one.num 
two = PropertyTwo()
print two.num

In the key line, "num = property(getNum,setNum,delNum)". I changed this line to this careless, now like this "__num = property(getNum,setNum,delNum)".

The result of this code:

File "property.py", line 6, in setNum
    self.__num = value
RuntimeError: maximum recursion depth exceeded
  1. Why do I get this unexpected result when replacing num to __num?
  2. How to understand the magic of property() and why should one use private variables?*
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The line self.__num = value results in the property setter being invoked.

The property setter tries to set self.__num, which results in the property setter being invoked. The property setter tries to set self.__num, which results in the property setter being invoked. The property setter tries to set self.__num, which results in the property setter being invoked. The property setter tries to set self.__num, which results in the property setter being invoked. The property setter tries to set self.__num, which results in the property setter being invoked. The property setter tries to set self.__num, which results in the property setter being invoked. The property setter tries to set self.__num, which results in the property setter being invoked. The property setter tries to set self.__num, which results in the property setter being invoked.

Infinite recursion detected.

When your property is not named __num, this obviously does not happen.

To be explicit: Python sees the line self.__num = value as a STORE_ATTR opcode:

>>> import dis
>>> def setNum(self, value):
...     self.__num = value
... 
>>> dis.dis(setNum)
  2           0 LOAD_FAST                1 (value)
              3 LOAD_FAST                0 (self)
              6 STORE_ATTR               0 (__num)
              9 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             12 RETURN_VALUE        

The implementation for STORE_ATTR will first look for a data descriptor on the class, and finds your __num property object. The call is then effectively translated to:

PropertyShow.__num.__set__(self, value)

The property object looks up the configured setter function, which is PropertyShow.setNum and calls it as PropertyShow.setNum(self, value). This in turn calls self.__num = value again and recursion takes over from there.

share|improve this answer
    
So what happens when the property setter tries to set self.__num again exactly? –  Jon Clements Aug 29 '13 at 15:24
    
@JonClements: There, better? –  Martijn Pieters Aug 29 '13 at 15:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.