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I have vector<string> files with name of five files:

C:\Directory\d.txt

C:\Directory\e.txt

C:\Directory\f.txt

C:\Directory\g.txt

C:\Directory\h.txt

When I'm trying display content and size files with this code:

int a = files.size();
int b = 0;

cout<<a<<endl;;

for(b; b<a ;b++)
{
    cout<<files[b]<<endl;
}

It's work fine - name of files and size of vector is ok. Now I have to delete this files, so I modified my code like this:

int a = files.size();
int b = 0;

for(b; b<a ;b++)
{
    if(remove(files[b]) == 0)
    {
        cout<<GetLastError();
        cout<<"\nRemoved: "<<files[b]<<endl;
    }
}

But it's didn't working - application is crashed with error:

Debug Assertion Failed!

Program: C:\Windows\system32\MSVCP110D.dll File: c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 11.0\vc\include\vector Line: 1140

Expression: vector subscript out of range

For information on how your program can cause an assertion failure, see the Visual C++ documentation on asserts.

(Press Retry to debug the application)

And GetLastError returns code 18 (There are no more files.) after succeeded removing.

Output:

18 Removed: C:\Directory\d.txt

18 Removed: C:\Directory\f.txt

18 Removed: C:\Directory\h.txt

Files: d.txt, f.txt and h.txt are really deleted, but e.txt and g.txt not. Second and fourth files always stay and not removed. If I created new vector with 7 names of files, my code would remove 1-st,3-th,5-th and 7-th files.

I would like to know why? What part of my code ignore every other file?

PS. I'm using Visual Studio 2012.

UPDATE:

remove() function is standard function from windows.h header. I do not write my own. vector<string>files should be ok - i add item with files.push_back("C:\\Directory\d.txt") - and five times like this.

@ChrisCM help me with deleting files: when I replaced line:

if(remove(files[b]) == 0)

with his line:

if(remove(files[files.size() - 1]) == 0)

it remove all files but application still crashed with error "Debug Assertion Failed!..." (whole message on top in this post).

share|improve this question
    
Is your array correctly built ? –  nouney Aug 29 '13 at 15:20
2  
I think we need to see the code for remove. If remove is supposed to be the standard C++ function of that name then the code posted will not compile. In that case we need to see the real code. –  john Aug 29 '13 at 15:23
    
You need to show us how you allocate your array and also please walk through your code line by line and you can see what b is when it crashes and weather it is crashing on remove(files[b]) or on the cout << files[b] line. –  Chemistpp Aug 29 '13 at 15:26
1  
Visual Studio has a reasonable debugger. IMHO much better than the human-powered debugging service provided by this site. –  n.m. Aug 29 '13 at 15:42
1  
Please declare a and b as size_t instead of int. Not that this is the source of the problem. –  Siyuan Ren Aug 30 '13 at 13:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I find it likely that your remove code is readjusting the position of items in the array. Example:

012345

After removing 2 you have

01345

not

01_345

As such you want to remove the 0th element(or likely last element would be more optimal) of your array files.size() times. So replace this line:

if(remove(files[b]) == 0)

With this:

if(remove(files[0]) == 0)

Or optimally

if(remove(files[files.size() - 1]) == 0)

But this is of course dependant on your implementation of remove, but I find this explanation highly likely given your explanation of the symptoms.

You need to adjust your for loop to use this logic as well, otherwise you are attempting to access a value that no longer exists in the vector:

while(files.size()) {
    cout << "\nRemoving: " << files.back() << endl;
    remove(files.back());
    //Add your error handling here if you wish.
}
share|improve this answer
    
I also first thought of this, but it seems that he is passing the value from the vector to remove() not the actual vector so his code could not be altering the vector itself. –  Rudolfs Bundulis Aug 29 '13 at 15:34
    
The vector could be a class variable/global(hopefully not), in which case all he would need would be the item and/or reference to the item to be pulled out of the vector. We need to see his remove() function. –  ChrisCM Aug 29 '13 at 15:37
    
Of course, my reasoning was that he is not hiding code that is 10 times bigger or more complex than what is posted :D But of course, the key is implementation of remove(). –  Rudolfs Bundulis Aug 29 '13 at 15:39
    
@ChrisCM yep, you're right - after replaced my line to your, application removed all files but still still display an error "Debug Assertion Failed! ..." (in my first post). PS. remove() function is standard from windows.h header. –  1_bug Aug 30 '13 at 12:51
    
You also then need to remove the files[b] reference in your program. If you wish to print out the file that you've removed, you should print it out before removal, and not based on the value of b. See edits. –  ChrisCM Aug 30 '13 at 13:23

Just a quick note, I was confused by the comment that standard remove() would not work, so I did a quick test project in VS2012 and this seems to work:

// RemoveTest.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//

#include "stdafx.h"

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <Windows.h>

using namespace std;

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    std::vector<char*> files;
    files.push_back("C:\\test\\a.txt");
    files.push_back("C:\\test\\b.txt");
    files.push_back("C:\\test\\c.txt");
    int a = files.size();
    int b = 0;
    for(b; b<a ;b++)
    {
        if(remove(files[b]) == 0)
        {
            cout<<GetLastError();
            cout<<"\nRemoved: "<<files[b]<<endl;
        }
    }
}

So there must be something wrong with your remove().

share|improve this answer
    
The difference is that you have vector<char*> but the OP has vector<string>. Standard remove would not compile with the OP's posted code. –  john Aug 29 '13 at 21:26
    
Yeah, I just realized i missed the first line, my bad, but still at least he now has some reference. –  Rudolfs Bundulis Aug 30 '13 at 9:13

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