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I have a JSON obj, after some operations (like delete some pieces), I print it and everything looks good except that I have some null values. How do I remove these?

I use JSON.stringify(obj, null, 2) method to print, and here is what it looks like:

{
    "store": {
        "book": [
             null,
             {
                 "category": "fiction",
                 "author": "Evelyn Waugh",
                 "title": "Sword of Honour",
                 "price": 12.99
             },
             null,
             {
                  "category": "fiction",
                  "author": "J. R. R. Tolkien",
                  "title": "The Lord of the Rings",
                  "isbn": "0-395-19395-8",
                  "price": 22.99
             }
        ],
        "bicycle": {
             "color": "red",
             null,
             "price": 19.95
        }
    }
}

I want it to be much compact and pretty clean(remove the extra 3 null values):

{
    "store": {
        "book": [
             {
                 "category": "fiction",
                 "author": "Evelyn Waugh",
                 "title": "Sword of Honour",
                 "price": 12.99
             },
             {
                  "category": "fiction",
                  "author": "J. R. R. Tolkien",
                  "title": "The Lord of the Rings",
                  "isbn": "0-395-19395-8",
                  "price": 22.99
             }
        ],
        "bicycle": {
             "color": "red",
             "price": 19.95
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
5  
Your bicycle is not valid syntax because of the null. –  Joe Enos Aug 29 '13 at 15:38
1  
I wonder which implementation of JSON.stringify generated that invalid JSON. –  James McLaughlin Aug 29 '13 at 15:47
    
ignore the bicycle element, you are right here, and it's my mistake –  lauxp Aug 29 '13 at 16:11
    
This is not a duplicate, due to the recursive aspect. –  Phrogz Aug 29 '13 at 16:28

5 Answers 5

// Iterate the array from back to front, removing null entries
for (var i=obj.store.book.length;i--;){
  if (obj.store.book[i]===null) obj.store.book.splice(i,1);
}

If you want to remove all null values recursively from both objects and arrays:

// Compact arrays with null entries; delete keys from objects with null value
function removeNulls(obj){
  var isArray = obj instanceof Array;
  for (var k in obj){
    if (obj[k]===null) isArray ? obj.splice(k,1) : delete obj[k];
    else if (typeof obj[k]=="object") removeNulls(obj[k]);
  }
}

Seen in action:

var o = {
  "store": {
    "book": [
       null,
       {
         "category": "fiction",
         "author": "Evelyn Waugh",
         "title": "Sword of Honour",
         "price": 12.99
       },
       null,
       {
          "category": "fiction",
          "author": "J. R. R. Tolkien",
          "title": "The Lord of the Rings",
          "isbn": "0-395-19395-8",
          "price": 22.99
       }
    ],
    "bicycle": {
       "color": "red",
       "bad": null,
       "price": 19.95
    }
  }
}

removeNulls(o);

console.log(JSON.stringify(o,null,2));
// {
//   "store": {
//     "book": [
//       {
//         "category": "fiction",
//         "author": "Evelyn Waugh",
//         "title": "Sword of Honour",
//         "price": 12.99
//       },
//       {
//         "category": "fiction",
//         "author": "J. R. R. Tolkien",
//         "title": "The Lord of the Rings",
//         "isbn": "0-395-19395-8",
//         "price": 22.99
//       }
//     ],
//     "bicycle": {
//       "color": "red",
//       "price": 19.95
//     }
//   }
// }
share|improve this answer
    
how to recursively iterate a object to apply this routine? consider i have no idea of the structure of the object, the store.book is just a example i wrote here.. i'm a new Javascript guy totally –  lauxp Aug 29 '13 at 16:14
    
I've added an implementation that will recursively crawl objects/arrays and remove null values. –  Phrogz Aug 29 '13 at 16:21
    
thanks, don't know why it never fall into this 'if' branch: if (obj[k]===null), hm.. –  lauxp Aug 29 '13 at 17:12
    
@user2729847 Is it the string "null"? Is it actually the value undefined? You could change the ===null to just ==null to be more permissive. –  Phrogz Aug 29 '13 at 17:20
    
the object we're talking here is thru delete this way: var action = "delete o['store']['book'][0]"; eval(action); so the array hole here should be null, weird.. –  lauxp Aug 29 '13 at 17:29

Fixing your book array is easy enough - you just have to filter out the nulls. The most straightforward way would probably be building a new array and reassigning it:

var temp = [];
var i;
for (i = 0; i < obj.store.book.length; ++i) {
    if (obj.store.book[i] != null) {
        temp.push(obj.store.book[i]);
    }
}
obj.store.book = temp;

I'm sure there are plenty of other ways, like using jQuery, or the filter function (which I believe is not available in older browsers). You could also loop through the array and splice out the nulls. I just find this way the easiest to read.

share|improve this answer

How do you deletes your pieces ?

Delete an array element with the delete operator leaves a hole in the array. Instead, you should use Array.splice which can remove properly an element from array.

share|improve this answer

I use the code here

Remove empty elements from an array in Javascript

then you could call it like

JSON.stringify(obj.clean(null), null, 2)

You would need to modify the code to work with objects too (or use the code as is inside the objects)

share|improve this answer
    
if obj is not array, no method of clean error.. –  lauxp Aug 29 '13 at 16:10
    
Yes, Thats why i said either modify or run it inside the objects –  exussum Aug 29 '13 at 16:11

I had to solve a similar problem, however I wanted to remove not only null values but also undefined, NaN, empty String, empty array and empty object values, recursively, by inspecting nested objects and also nested arrays.

The following function is using Lo-Dash:

function pruneEmpty(obj) {
  return function prune(current) {
    _.forOwn(current, function (value, key) {
      if (_.isUndefined(value) || _.isNull(value) || _.isNaN(value) ||
        (_.isString(value) && _.isEmpty(value)) ||
        (_.isObject(value) && _.isEmpty(prune(value)))) {

        delete current[key];
      }
    });
    // remove any leftover undefined values from the delete 
    // operation on an array
    if (_.isArray(current)) _.pull(current, undefined);

    return current;

  }(_.cloneDeep(obj));  // Do not modify the original object, create a clone instead
}

For example, if you invoke the method with the following input object:

var dirty = {
  key1: 'AAA',
  key2: {
    key21: 'BBB'
  },
  key3: {
    key31: true,
    key32: false
  },
  key4: {
    key41: undefined,
    key42: null,
    key43: [],
    key44: {},
    key45: {
      key451: NaN,
      key452: {
        key4521: {}
      },
      key453: [ {foo: {}, bar:''}, NaN, null, undefined ]
    },
    key46: ''
  },
  key5: {
    key51: 1,
    key52: '  ',
    key53: [1, '2', {}, []],
    key54: [{ foo: { bar: true, baz: null }}, { foo: { bar: '', baz: 0 }}]
  },
  key6: function () {}
};

It'll recursively discard all the "bad" values, keeping in the end only the ones that carry some information.

var clean = pruneEmpty(dirty);
console.log(JSON.stringify(clean, null, 2));

{
  key1: 'AAA',
  key2: {
    key21: 'BBB'
  },
  key3: {
    key31: true,
    key32: false
  },
  key5: {
    key51: 1,
    key52: '  ',
    key53: [1, '2'],
    key54: [{ foo: { bar: true }}, { foo: { baz: 0 }}]
  }
};

Hope it helps!

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