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I have this simple struct called Item.

struct Item {
    unsigned int id;
    std::string name;

    Item() : id( 0 ), name( std::string( "" ) ) {

    };
};

Then I have this class to hold all these Items.

class ItemData {
public:
    std::vector< Item > m_Items;
private:
    void load() {
         // Parse a JSON string to fill up m_Items vector with
         // Item objects.
    }

    const Item getItem( unsigned int pID ) {
        // Create an "empty" Item object with ID = 0 and name = ""
        Item temp = Item();

        // Loop through the vector
        for ( unsigned int i = 0; i < m_Items.size(); i++ ) {
            // Check if the current Item object has the id we are looking for
            if ( m_Items.at( i ).id == pID ) {
                // The item is inside the vector, replace temp with the
                // target vector
                temp = m_Items.at( i );

                // Stop looping
                break;
            }
        }

        // If pID was found, temp will have the values of the object inside the vector
        // If not, temp will have id = 0 and name = ""
        return temp;
    }
};

I feel this method takes too much time, especially if ItemData::getItem(unsigned int) was invoked inside a loop.

Is there a more efficient way of getting objects inside a vector without looping through the vector? Should I use a different container instead (std::list for example)?

share|improve this question
    
What are some examples of your IDs? Regarding a different container, std::map has O(log n) lookup time. –  Dark Falcon Aug 29 '13 at 15:54
    
@DarkFalcon IDs are simply unsigned integers. 0, 1, 176, 2000 are some valid IDs. –  alxcyl Aug 29 '13 at 15:56
1  
name( std::string( "" ) ) is entirely redundant. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 29 '13 at 15:59
    
getItem is gross. For one thing, you're reinventing the wheel. std::find does this for you, given that you provide a functor (or a lambda in C++11). For another, getItem doesn't just get the item. It find it, and then it replaces it. Simple is better than complex. –  John Dibling Aug 29 '13 at 16:00
1  
@JohnDibling: What do you mean "it replaces it"? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 29 '13 at 16:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you just want to iterate over all items in the container, then vector is great. If you do the find relatively infrequently where the linear search doesn't matter performance wise, then the vector is probably still ok.

If you need to be able to look up an item by its id and don't care about preserving the insertion order of the items in the container, then either use map or unordered_map depending on your sorting needs, container size, etc.

If you need to maintain the insertion order and do fast lookups by id and you won't be removing items from the vector, then I would suggest an unordered_map of id to index, and maintain the id-index mapping when you add new items.

share|improve this answer
    
I would like to retain insertion order as well as fast lookups but removing items would probably be not needed. –  alxcyl Aug 29 '13 at 15:59
    
@LanceGray: I suggest a solution based on your comment in my answer. –  Andrew Tomazos Aug 29 '13 at 17:23

Use a std::map instead:

class ItemData {
public:
    std::map<unsigned, Item> m_Items;
private:
    void load() {
         // Parse a JSON string to fill up m_Items vector with
         // Item objects.
    }

    const Item getItem(unsigned id) const {
        std::map<unsigned, Item>::const_iterator it = m_Items.find(id);
        if (it != m_Items.end())
            return it->second;
        return Item();
    }
};

You could consider std::unordered_map as well.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm a bit confused with <unsigned, Item>. I can tell that unsigned will be the key for each Item object, but shouldn't unsigned be unsigned int? Or they are of the same type? –  alxcyl Aug 29 '13 at 16:01
1  
@LanceGray Yes, they are the same. –  trojanfoe Aug 29 '13 at 16:01
    
This is a good reason to write unsigned int. Okay so you saved four keystrokes: well done! You killed clarity as a result, though. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 29 '13 at 16:21

Definitely not std::list. I believe you're looking for std::map (which maps unique IDs to objects). Or perhaps std::set (which just stores unique objects) with a custom comparator, so that the Items would be compared based on their id.

set would have the downside of storing the objects as const. I believe map suits you best (the overhead of storing the id once as the map key and once inside the Item is low).

share|improve this answer
    
I wouldn't mind my objects to be const as I am most likely not going to alter the container and its objects once they have been set up. –  alxcyl Aug 29 '13 at 16:02

I would like to retain insertion order as well as fast lookups but removing items would probably be not needed

So what you want is to make an index for the vector. That is create a hash table that maps the item id to the items position in the vector:

class ItemData {
    vector< Item > m_Items;
    unordered_map<unsigned int, size_t> m_ItemsIndex;

    void prepare_index()
    {
        for (size_t i = 0; i < m_Items.size(); i++)
           m_ItemsIndex[m_Items[i].id] = i;
    }

    Item& get_item(unsigned int id)
    {
        size_t pos = m_ItemsIndex[id];
        return m_Items[pos];
    }
}

This increases the speed of lookup from linear (O(n)) to constant time (O(1)).

Call prepare_index at the end of load. You'll also want to add error checking etc, but you get the idea.

Insertion order is preserved because you can still iterate the vector directly.

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