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I am using regex to capture hashtags from a string like this:

var words = "#hashed words and some #more #hashed words";
var tagslistarr = words.match(/#\S+/g); 

console.log(tagslistarr);

this will return an array like this;

["#hashed", "#more", "#hashed"]

question: how can i remove the # hash sign from each of the array items? this is what i would like in the end

["hashed", "more", "hashed"]
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
var words = "#hashed words and some #more #hashed words";
var tagslistarr = words.match(/#\S+/g); 
tagslistarr = tagslistarr.map(function(x) { return x.substr(1); } );
console.log(tagslistarr)

prints

["hashed", "more", "hashed"]
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Try:

words.match( /#\S+/g ).map( function(x) { return x.replace(/^#/,''); } );

A better way to do this would be zero-width assertions; unfortunately, JavaScript does not support look-behind assertions, only look-ahead. (As an aside, here is a blog post about mimicking lookbehind assertions in JavaScript. I can't say as I care much for any of the solutions, but it's good reading nonetheless. I sure hope lookbehind assertions make it into ES6.)

As pointed out by SimonR in the comments below, Array.prototype.map is not available in IE8 and below. However, it's easy enough to polyfill:

if( !Array.prototype.map ) {
    Array.prototype.map = function(f) { 
        var r = []; 
        for( var i=0; i<this.length; i++ ) r[i] = f(this[i]); 
        return r; 
    }
}
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Note, array.map is not supported in IE8 or less: MDN –  SimonR Aug 29 '13 at 16:31
    
True. Array.prototype.map was introduced in JavaScript 1.6 in Nov 2005. So it's more than seven years old. If you (or your clients) are using a browser that isn't implementing seven year-old features, maybe it's time to switch, hmmm? Also, it's easy enough to polyfill Array.prototype.map. –  Ethan Brown Aug 29 '13 at 16:36
    
In principal I completely agree with you, but unfortunately there are still a lot of folk out there in the real world using IE8 (or less!). Good point about the polyfill though, it's one reason I love javascript so much :) –  SimonR Aug 29 '13 at 16:39
    
I know...I'm getting increasingly frustrated with the "real world", though. More and more, I'm taking the approach of just serving up a page that says "your browser is hopelessly out of date. please upgrade" for people using ancient browsers. There's a point at which you can't keep catering to people who won't upgrade.... Depends on the website/service you're offering, of course. –  Ethan Brown Aug 29 '13 at 16:42
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Use a capturing group in your regex:

words.replace(/#(\S+)/g, '$1');

EDIT:

To get them as an array:

var tagslistarr = words.match(/#\S+/g);

for( var i = 0, l = tagslistarr.length; i < l; i++ ) {
  tagslistarr[ i ] = tagslistarr[ i ].substr( 1 );
}
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1  
That just removes the hashes without creating the array. –  Matt Ball Aug 29 '13 at 16:23
    
Ah, sorry. Misread the question. I'll update my answer –  SimonR Aug 29 '13 at 16:24
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var words = "#hashed words and some #more #hashed words";
var regexp = /#(\S+)/g; // Capture the part of the match you want
var results = [];
var match;
while((match = regexp.exec(words))) // Loop through all matches
  results.push(match[1]);           // Add them to results array

console.log(results);
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