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I need to give the possibility to add any method returning double and taking any amount of double parameters to the Dictionary. Help me please.

class Program
{
Dictionary<string, Delegate> _functions;
static double MyFunc (double x, double y, double z, double q, double r, double t)
    {
        return 100;
    }
// and the user can create his functions with any amount of parameters
static void AddFunction (Delegate d)
    {            
        _functions.Add (d.Method.Name, d);
    } 
static void Main (string [] args)
    {
        _functions = new Dictionary<string, Delegate> ();
        Program.AddFunction(MyFunc);
    }
} 
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, I'm not sure how you plan on exactly calling this. Since you have a variable number of inputs, you can treat them like an array input.

delegate double MyDictionaryDelegate(params double[] input);

static Dictionary<string, MyDictionaryDelegate> _functions;

static void AddFunction (MyDictionaryDelegate d)
{            
   _functions.Add(d.Method.Name, d);
} 

But then this essentially turns your called functions into handling collections (with any of the benefits/limitations this implies):

public static double MyFunc (params double[] input)
{
   return input.Sum();
}

So your usage might be like:

_functions = new Dictionary<string, MyDictionaryDelegate> ();
AddFunction(MyFunc);
Console.WriteLine(_functions["MyFunc"](1, 2.5, 0));//3.5

But I suspect you'd rather keep the original list of parameter arguments rather than a list, something like this:

public static double AnotherFunc(double x, double y, double z)
{
    return x + y + z;
}

You could simply have a wrapper function:

public static double AnotherFunc(params double[] input)
{
    //preferably with some check that the proper number of 
    //input parameters are included
    return AnotherFuncImpl(input[0], input[1], input[2]);
}

But this seems overall kind of dangerous to me; I'm not sure I'd recommend it.

EDIT: Here's another option to avoid the param double[] input arrays and always have fixed parameter arguments. Use the Delegate as you had, but you'd have to use its DynamicInvoke. In addition, you'd declare several AddFunction overloads for each number of parameters you expect to reasonably have:

static Dictionary<string, Delegate> _functions;

private static void AddFunction (string functionName, Delegate d)
{            
   _functions.Add(functionName, d);
} 

private static void AddFunction(Func<double> d)
{            
   _functions.Add(d.Method.Name, d);
} 

private static void AddFunction(Func<double, double> d)
{            
   _functions.Add(d.Method.Name, d);
} 

private static void AddFunction(Func<double, double, double> d)
{            
   _functions.Add(d.Method.Name, d);
} 

private static void AddFunction(Func<double, double, double, double> d)
{            
   _functions.Add(d.Method.Name, d);
} 

//additional overloads up to N parameters

Then usage might be:

public static double MyFunc(double x, double y, double z)
{
    return x + y + z;
}

_functions = new Dictionary<string, Delegate> ();
AddFunction(MyFunc);
Console.WriteLine(_functions["MyFunc"].DynamicInvoke(1, 2.5, 0));//3.5

But once again, this can fail if the caller did not properly call DynamicInvoke with the exact number of required parameters (no more, no less).

I still feel as though overall, whatever it is you're doing would benefit from a different design.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually the problem is as follows: I need to write a console calculator. One of the overloads of AddFunction method looks like: – Dima Aug 29 '13 at 18:22
    
@Dima: I'm guessing there's more to your comment coming? :) – Chris Sinclair Aug 29 '13 at 18:28
    
Thank you for the first answer. Then I'd like to answer the following: Let's imagine the situation when the function takes double [] parameter but a user mustn't create any arrays. Instead we will have in the console: "MyFunk(10,20,30,40 and so on) =" In my dictionary I have a delegate with 1-param method(an array), but I need to know how many params are used in the console to create an appropriate array and to pass it to the delegate in the dictionary. Do I really need to derive this information from parsing the string, or there is a smarter way to do this? – Dima Aug 29 '13 at 18:42
    
Yes and no. Yes, you should parse the input string. This helps cover cases of bad input (letters instead of numbers). Parsing might not be that bad either, for example, assuming you parse out "10, 20, 30, 40" you could convert that by double[] array = input.Split(',').Select(s => Double.Parse(s.Trim())).ToArray(); If you want to skip that entirely, and leave it up to the user to input valid information, perhaps you could consider an expression evaluator like NCalc or FLEE. – Chris Sinclair Aug 29 '13 at 18:47

Define a new class object that has the delegate and the parameter list you require, then the dictionary<string, clsObject> would be how you define the dictionary.

share|improve this answer

Cast the method as a Func<T1, T2, .., TResult> when you add it to the collection:

Program.AddFunction(
    (Func<double, double, double, double, double, double, double>)MyFunc);
share|improve this answer

You need to declare your delegate as returning a double, and taking a param of doubles, here is a full working example.

public class Widget
{
    // declares a delegate called AddDelegate that takes a param of doubles
    public delegate double AddDelegate(params double[] dbls);
    Dictionary<string, AddDelegate> functions;

    public Widget()
    {
        functions = new Dictionary<string, AddDelegate>();
    }

    public void Add(AddDelegate d)
    {
        functions.Add(d.Method.Name, d);
    }

    public void Run()
    {
        foreach (var kvp in functions)
        {
            // write out the name and result of each function added to our list
            Console.Write(kvp.Key);
            Console.Write(": ");
            Console.Write(kvp.Value(10.0, 10.0, 10.0, 10.0));
        }
    }
}

class Program
{
    static double CalcDouble(params double[] dbls)
    {
        double total = 0.0;
        foreach (double d in dbls)
        {
            total += d;
        }
        return total;
    }


    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var w = new Widget();
        w.Add(new Widget.AddDelegate(CalcDouble));
        w.Run();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But you cannot add a method with the signature double CalcDouble(double x, double y); each method to be added to the dictionary must have params double[] as the only parameter. – Zev Spitz Aug 29 '13 at 17:28
    
Yeah, that's pretty much the only way to really do what you want to do, unless you feel like wrapping all the possible overloads you'd ever want to use. – Mike Corcoran Aug 29 '13 at 18:32

Do you mean defining a delegate with the params modifier on its arguments? The answer is apparently no, because the compiler converts the additional arguments to an array in a method call, but not for delegates. See the link for some solutions.

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