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I have some HTML which I want to use display: table css attributes to control. Unfortunately, I cannot actually change the HTML (or JS either), only the CSS (long story). This is a problem, because the structure of the existing HTML is causing trouble for the table layout. Here is a simplified version of the HTML and CSS:

<style>
    .like-table { display: table;}
    .like-tr { display: table-row;}
    .like-th { display: table-cell; border: 1px solid gray;}
    .useless-div-1 { }
    .useless-div-2 { }
    .like-td { display: table-cell; border: 1px solid gray;}
</style>
<div class="like-table">
    <div class="like-tr">
        <div class="like-th">1</div>
        <div class="like-th">22</div>
        <div class="like-th">3</div>
    </div>
    <div class="useless-div-1"><div class="useless-div-2">
        <div class="like-tr">
            <div class="like-td">111</div>
            <div class="like-td">2</div>
            <div class="like-td">3</div>
        </div>
        <div class="like-tr">
            <div class="like-td">11</div>
            <div class="like-td">2</div>
            <div class="like-td">333</div>
        </div>
    </div></div>
</div>

Sadly, this renders the header and body columns width different widths:

enter image description here

If I remove the "useless-div-*" open and closing tags:

<div class="like-table">
    <div class="like-tr">
        <div class="like-th">1</div>
        <div class="like-th">22</div>
        <div class="like-th">3</div>
    </div>
    <div class="like-tr">
        <div class="like-td">111</div>
        <div class="like-td">2</div>
        <div class="like-td">3</div>
    </div>
    <div class="like-tr">
        <div class="like-td">11</div>
        <div class="like-td">2</div>
        <div class="like-td">333</div>
    </div>
</div>

Then it renders fine, aligning header and body column widths:

enter image description here

So, is there anything I can do to the CSS that will cause the first set of HTML to behave like the second? Remember I cannot modify the HTML or JavaScript -- only the CSS! Please do not ask why...

Click here to tinker with the code.

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1  
Can you modify the JS? If so, you could remove that useless-div with JS. –  andi Aug 29 '13 at 16:59
    
@andi - great question. for purposes of this, the answer is no. –  jlarson Aug 29 '13 at 17:06

1 Answer 1

Since you're wrapping table-row elements by useless-div, you could simply set display property of useless-div to table-row-group:

.useless-div { display: table-row-group; }

In CSS table layouts, all elements should follow the same structural properties.

Here is the JSBin Demo.


Update

After scratching my head for the past 5 hours over this, I realized that it's impossible to handle this by the current way.

So, I decided to write new styles to create a flexible CSS table. But I should mention a few things at first:

  • To keep the columns aligned vertically, setting a specific width to cells is required.
  • In the following example, I set borders to display the table better. because of that, I used box-sizing property to force browser to calculate the width of each cell including its padding and border. If you don't need border, remove it and the border-box property as well.

The Approach

.like-table {
  width: 400px;    /* You could declare a specific width. Your choice */
  margin: 0 auto;
}

.like-th, .like-td {
  float: left;    /* <--  Float the cells to stick together                    */
  width: 33.33%;  /* <--  I applied the same width on each cell.               */
  /* I've explained how to set specific width for each column in the following */

  border: 1px solid gray;          /* Add border around each cell */

  -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;  /* Force browser to calculate width+borders */
  -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
  box-sizing: border-box;
}

.like-tr:after { /* Clearfix hack */
  content: ' ';
  font: 0/0 a;
  display: block;
  clear: both;
}

Note: To apply specific width on each column (left + center + right), First set a width on each cell as I did at above, then use the following selectors to override the applied width for left and right columns:

.like-table .like-td:first-child, /* Selectors for the left column */
.like-table .like-th:first-child { 
  width: 100px;     /*  <-- Override the width for the left column */
  border-right: 0;  /* You might also want to remove right borders */
}

.like-table .like-td:last-child,  /* Selectors for the right column */
.like-table .like-th:last-child {
  width: 100px;      /* <-- Override the width for the right column */
  border-left: 0;    /* You might also want to remove left borders  */
}

JSBin Demo #1. (fluid width)

JSBin Demo #2. (fixed width)

share|improve this answer
    
YOU ARE RIGHT! I swear I tried that before and it didn't work but.. it is now??? –  jlarson Aug 29 '13 at 17:08
    
@joelarson Maybe there was a typo :) –  Hashem Qolami Aug 29 '13 at 17:13
    
except I just realized my example was oversimplified. There are TWO nested useless divs. –  jlarson Aug 29 '13 at 17:14
    
@joelarson I updated my answer. Hope it helps. –  Hashem Qolami Aug 30 '13 at 0:39
    
Wow, epic....... –  jlarson Aug 30 '13 at 21:14

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