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So, I'm attempting to communicate with a device over a serialport object in C#. The device is looking for a mask value to be sent to it as a part of a command string. For example, one of the strings will be something like "SETMASK:{}", where {} is the unsigned 8-bit mask.

When I use a terminal (such as BRAY) to communicate with the device, I can get the device to work. For example, in BRAY terminal, the string SETMASK:$FF will set the mask to 0xFF. However, I can't for the life of me figure out how to do this in C#.

I've already tried the following function, where Data is the mask value and CMD is the surrounding string ("SETMASK:" in this case"). Where am I going wrong?

public static string EmbedDataInString(string Cmd, byte Data)
    {
        byte[] ConvertedToByteArray = new byte[(Cmd.Length * sizeof(char)) + 2];
        System.Buffer.BlockCopy(Cmd.ToCharArray(), 0, ConvertedToByteArray, 0, ConvertedToByteArray.Length - 2);

        ConvertedToByteArray[ConvertedToByteArray.Length - 2] = Data;

        /*Add on null terminator*/
        ConvertedToByteArray[ConvertedToByteArray.Length - 1] = (byte)0x00;

        Cmd = System.Text.Encoding.Unicode.GetString(ConvertedToByteArray);

        return Cmd;
    }
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When you do it through Bray, you literally send the three characters '$', 'F', and 'F'? – hatchet Aug 29 '13 at 18:05
    
No, in Bray, that's how you send a nonprintable character. $XX => 0xXX. So, $FF => 0xFF => 0b11111111 – pYr0 Aug 29 '13 at 18:33
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Can't be certain, but I'll bet your device is expecting 1-byte chars, but the C# char is 2 bytes. Try converting your string into a byte array with Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(). You'll probably also need to return the byte[] array instead of a string, since you'll end up converting it back to 2 byte chars.

using System.Text;

// ...

public static byte[] EmbedDataInString(string Cmd, byte Data)
{
    byte[] ConvertedToByteArray = new byte[Cmd.Length + 2];
    System.Buffer.BlockCopy(Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(Cmd), 0, ConvertedToByteArray, 0, ConvertedToByteArray.Length - 2);

    ConvertedToByteArray[ConvertedToByteArray.Length - 2] = Data;

    /*Add on null terminator*/
    ConvertedToByteArray[ConvertedToByteArray.Length - 1] = (byte)0x00;

    return ConvertedToByteArray;
}

If your device accepts some other character encoding, swap out ASCII for the appropriate one.

share|improve this answer
    
A bit more concise than my solution. Good to know. Thanks! – pYr0 Aug 29 '13 at 18:54

Problem solved, the System.Buffer.BlockCopy() command was embedding zeroes after each character in the string. This works:

public static byte[] EmbedDataInString(string Cmd, byte Data)
    {
        byte[] ConvertedToByteArray = new byte[(Cmd.Length * sizeof(byte)) + 3];
        char[] Buffer = Cmd.ToCharArray();

        for (int i = 0; i < Buffer.Length; i++)
        {
            ConvertedToByteArray[i] = (byte)Buffer[i];
        }

        ConvertedToByteArray[ConvertedToByteArray.Length - 3] = Data;
        ConvertedToByteArray[ConvertedToByteArray.Length - 2] = (byte)0x0A;
        /*Add on null terminator*/
        ConvertedToByteArray[ConvertedToByteArray.Length - 1] = (byte)0x00;

        return ConvertedToByteArray;
    }
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