Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm rewriting a script that is used to summarize regression testing results. The program being tested spits out a few different text files, and any changes in these files between code versions are of interest to the developers. The old script used the command line diff utility on every single file, which takes a considerable amount of time (There are 2000ish tests, and 3 files to compare per test. This took about 30 minutes on our standard development machines). Then it generated an HTML file that contains a table with links to all non-null diffs.

As a developer, I've come to realize that, while they are often useful, most of those diffs are never looked at. One idea I had to speed this process is to compare the files using Python filecmp.cmp tool, and create a table of all of the differences. Then, use Javascript to diff only the links that are clicked on, using the diff_match_patch tool. These results would be displayed in the browser. I think I understand the API for diff_match_patch, but I'm stuck trying to load these files into the Javascript environment.

I've tried opening these files in an iframe (which I'd make invisible), but I cannot seem to access the files' content once they are open. I realize there are same-origin rules, but I would be reading the files from the same drive as the html file resides, which I think should be legal(?). I'm not sure if my problem is with my understanding of the DOM, or if this just isn't possible. My knowledge of Javascript is quite minimal/outdated which may be the real problem, but this seems to be a strange use case so I've had trouble finding any examples. If there's a quirk with browsers, I do have the ability to mandate which browser is used. Here's what I have so far, it's just a test to see what I've got loaded and what I'm accessing. In Chrome I get nothing added to the div, and in Firefox I get "undefined":

<html>
<head>
  <script type="text/javascript" language="JavaScript">
    function changeSrc() {
    var base = document.getElementById("base");
    base.src="../result/test1.txt";
    var mod = document.getElementById("mod");
    mod.src="../result/test2.txt";

    var result =  mod.contentWindow.document.body.innerText;
    document.getElementById('result').innerHTML = '<BR>' + result;
    }
  </script>
</head>

<body>
  <iframe id="base" src=""></iframe>
  <iframe id="mod" src=""></iframe>
  <br>
  <span onClick="changeSrc();" style="cursor: pointer;">loadFiles</span>
  <br>
  <div id="result"></div>
</body>
</html>

I'd appreciate any help making this work, or advice telling me I'm wasting my time. I'm also open to other outside-the-box ideas; maybe the time savings, given I'll need to run filecmp.cmp, won't be worth the trouble? Thanks in advance!

Edit: The question is a 2-parter I guess: 1) How do I read in a text file to use in a Javascript function (as a string)? 2) Is this a bad idea?

share|improve this question
    
And the question is? –  stackunderflow Aug 29 '13 at 18:57
    
Sorry if it wasn't clear. Edited my original post with explicit questions. –  joshindc Aug 29 '13 at 20:06
    
Your example as presented at Thu Aug 29 2013 23:53:54 GMT+0200 works for me when saved locally and visited with Google Chrome (without any web server). Clicking loadFiles makes the file contents appear. I get the following when I click a second time: Blocked a frame with origin "null" from accessing a frame with origin "null". Protocols, domains, and ports must match. SO18518842.htm:15 Uncaught TypeError: Cannot read property 'body' of undefined SO18518842.htm:15 –  stackunderflow Aug 29 '13 at 21:59
    
Yeah, I'm seeing that now. I also see it with funkwurm's answer below. I'm guessing that's the same-origin issue? I thought I'd avoid that with everything local? Any other way of loading a text file into a string, or am I out of luck? –  joshindc Aug 29 '13 at 22:13
    
No, Google Chrome at least complains. It's well-reported on SO. location.origin "file://" That's the problem, but reloading the page should not be too bad. –  stackunderflow Aug 29 '13 at 22:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I looked into this some more. If you want to access local files, without the need for a webserver, then the FileReader interface seems a better fit.

The basic bit is below, but my extended implementation (the diff function just diffs the lengths of the file contents) handles running the diff function automatically after the asynchronous loading of input files.

It also allows you to drop both files (as a single selection of two files) onto the dropzone.

And here is my public jsFiddle SO18518842.

    var readFileUpdateUI = function(file, element, nameElement) {
        var reader = new FileReader();
        nameElement.innerText = "Loading...";
        reader.onerror = errorHandler;
        reader.onload = function(readEvent) {
            filesLoaded++;
            console.timeEnd('read of ' + file.name)
            var result = readEvent.target.result;
            //                console.log(result);
            element.innerText = result;
            nameElement.innerText = file.name;
            if (filesLoaded === 2) {
                diffFiles();
            }
        };
        console.time('read of ' + file.name)
        reader.readAsText(file);
    };

This old answer is hampered by the need to run chrome.exe --allow-file-access-from-files

Don't know about firefox.

So this works pretty well for me with the caveat of having to ( Reload Page ) before loading another set of files, all accessed via file:// scheme and located in the same directory as this script.

Firefox also needs the reload.

Both Chrome and Firefox display the names of selected files as tooltip of the ( Choose Files ) button.

Firefox offers all file types in addition to text/plain (as defined in accept attribute), while Chrome does not.

<html><head>
  <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=US-ASCII">
  <script type="text/javascript" language="JavaScript">
    function changeSrc() {
    var base = document.getElementById("base");
    var fileArray = document.getElementById('input').files
    base.src=fileArray[0].name;
    var mod = document.getElementById("mod");
    mod.src='./'+fileArray[1].name;

    var result =  mod.contentWindow.document.body.innerText;
    document.getElementById('result').innerHTML = '<BR>' + result;
    }
  </script>
</head>
<body>
  <iframe id="base" src=""></iframe>
  <iframe id="mod" src=""></iframe>
  <br>
  <div>
  <input type="file" accept="text/plain" id="input" multiple>
  </div>
  <div>
  <input type="button" onclick="changeSrc();" value="Load Files"/>
  </div>
  <div>
  <input type="button" onclick="location.reload(true);" value="Reload Page"/>
  </div>
  <br>
  <div id="result"></div>
</body></html>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for following up on this. One requirement I have is that the user not need to select from a file dialog, but instead have a list of files populate an HTML table as links to be clicked. I have that working now in firefox with the equivalent to the chrome --allow-file-access-from-files option (found here). So, it seems I need to either provide a file selection dialog or change a security setting. Do you know any way around this? –  joshindc Sep 4 '13 at 15:13
    
@joshindc See var readFileUpdateUI = function(file, element, nameElement) { in my jsFiddle. The file argument is just 1 element returned by the file dialog, but you can just pass it an object with a name property, e.g. readFileUpdateUI({name: "basefile.txt"}, base, baseFileName). –  stackunderflow Sep 4 '13 at 20:17

Try to get the iframe's content in the onload handler rather than right after having set the src. It might be that your getting code is firing while the browser is still busy loading the file in the iframe.

var mod = document.getElementById("mod");
mod.onload = function() {
    var result =  mod.contentWindow.document.body.innerText;
    document.getElementById('result').innerHTML = '<BR>' + result;
}
mod.src="../result/test2.txt";
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.