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    public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Integer i=555,j=555;
        System.out.println(i==j); //false
        Integer l=5,n=5;
        System.out.println(l==n); //true
    }
}

Why, Java? How is that even possible?

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marked as duplicate by Hovercraft Full Of Eels, arshajii, Jon Skeet, Mat, Luiggi Mendoza Aug 29 '13 at 20:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
stackoverflow.com/questions/8427416/… - Duplicate, except the other way around. –  Mat Aug 29 '13 at 20:19
1  
Same reason why you almost always never compare Strings with ==. –  Dennis Meng Aug 29 '13 at 20:19
1  
@DennisMeng There is more to it than that. –  arshajii Aug 29 '13 at 20:20
    
@arshajii I'm probably oversimplifying, but understanding one will help in understanding the other. –  Dennis Meng Aug 29 '13 at 20:21
    
As mentioned by others, you are comparing objects and also you need to understand internals of Java for integers. –  Sachin Thapa Aug 29 '13 at 20:22

1 Answer 1

You're comparing the references of two different Integer class instances with the same value, so you must use the equals method (as it must be to compare equality between objects):

Integer i=555,j=555;
System.out.println(i==j); //false
Integer i=555,j=555;
System.out.println(i.equals(j)); //true

But Integer has a pool of Integer object instances for int values between -128 and 127. So when you do

Integer l=5,n=5;
System.out.println(l==n); //true

You receive true since l and n points to the same object reference.

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