Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this issue, well more of a query since I actually got it working but I don't understand why, I am currently learning java and reading cengage 7th edition and this is one of the exercises.

so I have this method:

public static void calculatePrice(){
        Scanner userInput = new Scanner(System.in);
        int orderNumber;
        double totalBill = 0;

        orderNumber = userInput.nextInt();
        switch(orderNumber){
        case 1:
            totalBill = totalBill + American;
            displayMenu();
            calculatePrice();
            break;
        case 2:
            totalBill = totalBill + Espresso;
            displayMenu();
            calculatePrice();
            break;
        case 3:
            totalBill = totalBill + Latte;
            displayMenu();
            calculatePrice();
            break;
        case 0:
            System.out.println("Your total bill will be $"+ totalBill);
            break;
        }
    }

this chapter is teaching me about decisions, i decided to use a switch in this case. I have another method that asks the user questions.

My issue with this method is the fields:

double totalBill = 0;

this doesn't work and I have no idea why, the program compiles but it always returns the set price of 0, regardless of my logic within the case scenarios.

However when I remove that field from the method and put it at the top, making it class wide:

private static double totalBill = 0;

It works fine, why is this? It seemed smarter to use it inside the method since no other method will require the use of it.

share|improve this question
    
It's all about the scope. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Aug 29 '13 at 20:38
    
right, i need to go back to that chapter then. I thought as long as it was in the same block it would be ok. However thanks! I can at least go back and re-read it :D –  Gibbo Aug 29 '13 at 20:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
//Note that you declare this method static: as such it will have no access to object
//member fields, only to class fields: these are member fields declared 'static'
public static void calculatePrice(){
    Scanner userInput = new Scanner(System.in);//Note this has little to do with actually calculating price.
    int orderNumber;
    double totalBill = 0;//You a declaring a new variable that will disappear once it goes out of the scope of this method

    orderNumber = userInput.nextInt();
    switch(orderNumber){
    case 1:
        totalBill = totalBill + American;
        displayMenu();
        calculatePrice();//Recursive call!
        break;
//... eliding for brevity
    case 0:
        System.out.println("Your total bill will be $"+ totalBill);
        break;
    }
} //this is the point where all method variables go out of scope, because this 'stack frame' is unloaded. Any subsequent call to this method will not 'remember' any state that was not saved elsewhere.

So, note that you're making a recursive call. What this means is that you're re-entering your function. Your 'totalBill' variable is newly instantiated, masking all other previous 'totalBill' variables. Those variables are still around... just inaccessible on lower stack frames. Think of stack frames as a new table, one upon which your function is run. When you call a new function, a new table is placed on top... but you can only see the top table. All other tables are beneath it.

By declaring the variable static, what it means is you're setting it aside so all functions in all objects of this type will have access to the same memory space. static variables are available to ALL objects of that class; hence they are often referred to as 'class fields', whereas non-static member variables are referred to as 'object fields'. Your class signature should, in a well-designed world look like:

public class RegisterOrder {
  public double totalBill;//Available to only ONE instance (object) of this class.

  public void calculatePrice() {//note no 'static' modifier!
    //some code
  }
}

This will probably not work with the way you're currently calling your calculatePrice function, since your current method is static. You'll have to change that to:

RegisterOrder order = new RegisterOrder();
order.calculatePrice();

Note, too, that your recursive call means that if you order many, many orders your program will crash. Think of this as stacking the tables too high. In a modern system this is hard to do (lots of memory), but good design demands a loop here:

public function getOrder() {
  //instantiate variables

  orderNumber = userInput.nextInt();
  while (orderNumber != 0) {
    switch(orderNumber){
      case 1:
        totalBill = totalBill + American;
        break;
      case 2:
        totalBill = totalBill + Expresso;
        break;
      case 3:
        totalBill = totalBill + Latte;
        break;
      default:
        //Error handling is important!
        break;
     }
     displayMenu();
     orderNumber = userInput.nextInt();
  }
  System.out.println("Your total bill will be $"+ totalBill);
}

Note that in this version you are not re-calling your input function. Note, too, that a 'totalBill' variable declared within this function is never unloaded or masked by another call to this function. In truly clean code, you'd separate your input-getting method from your bill-calculating method, but baby steps. :)

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for catching the recursive call, with the associated explanation. –  rgettman Aug 29 '13 at 21:27
1  
Mind. Blown. This helps a lot, thanks! I am not at the chapter of using loops or exception handling yet :D I know how to use while and for loops, I just presume you can do the tasks without them due the book not teaching them yet :) –  Gibbo Aug 30 '13 at 9:34

Your totalBill variable is declared locally, so it is initialized to 0 every time this method is called. Then it goes out of scope until the next time it's called, when it's initialized to 0 again.

With private static double totalBill = 0; outside the method, now it's a static class variable that retains its value no matter how many times calculatePrice is called. The scope is the entire class, not just the method, and it's not re-initialized when the method is called.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks!!! This really jogs my memory and makes total sense, appreciate your help :) –  Gibbo Aug 29 '13 at 20:42
1  
Your response is subtly wrong: in the OP's implementation, the calculatePrice() method calls itself. Therefore, what is actually happening is that the totalBill variable is being masked, not going out of scope. The behavior is the same in this case, of course. –  Nathaniel Ford Aug 29 '13 at 21:23

Static variables are bound to a class instead of object. In the first case you must be setting variable for an object.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.