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From the tutorial I had the impression that this should work (simplified example):

public class Foo {
    private String bar;
    public String getBar() {
        return bar;
    }
    public void setBar(String bar) {
        this.bar = bar;
    }
    public static class Qux {
        private String foobar;
        public String getFoobar() {
            return foobar;
        }
        public void setFoobar(String foobar) {
            this.foobar = foobar;
        }
    }
}
...

String in = "{ \"bar\": \"123\", \"qux\" : {\"foobar\": \"234\"}}";
ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
Foo obj = mapper.readValue(in, Foo.class);

However, I get an error

UnrecognizedPropertyException: Unrecognized field "qux" (Class Foo), not marked as ignorable

I'm running 2.2.2

share|improve this question
    
Can you link the tutorial? ObjectMapper by default will try to map all your fields. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Aug 29 '13 at 21:25
    
The "Full Data Binding (POJO) Example" from wiki.fasterxml.com/JacksonInFiveMinutes –  Peter Sabaini Aug 29 '13 at 21:34
    
That example doesn't show any missing fields. There's special configuration you need to set to ignore those. See my answer. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Aug 29 '13 at 21:36
    
I don't want to ignore those fields... I'd like to have them set on the inner Qux class –  Peter Sabaini Aug 29 '13 at 21:41
    
Your Foo class doesn't have a Qux class field. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Aug 29 '13 at 21:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It will work if you pull your Qux class out of Foo

public class Foo {
    private String bar;

    // added this
    private Qux qux;

    public String getBar() {
        return bar;
    }
    public void setBar(String bar) {
        this.bar = bar;
    }

    // added getter and setter
    public Qux getQux() {
        return qux;
    }
    public void setQux(Qux qux) {
        this.qux = bar;
    }
}

public static class Qux {
    private String foobar;
    public String getFoobar() {
        return foobar;
    }
    public void setFoobar(String foobar) {
        this.foobar = foobar;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Indeed it does. Thank you sir! –  Peter Sabaini Aug 29 '13 at 21:39
    
The location of the Qux class I doubt was the solution. Adding the qux property is the remedy. –  Brent Worden Aug 29 '13 at 22:04
    
@BrentWorden Leaving the Qux class where it was could have worked, but would have also required the @JsonIgnoreProperties attribute. –  Luke Willis Aug 29 '13 at 22:05
    
@LukeWillis No extra annotation is needed. Here is an example unit test that demonstrates the deserialization using a default object mapper and unannotated classes: gist.github.com/brentworden/6386024 –  Brent Worden Aug 30 '13 at 3:24

The Foo class needs an instance property of type Qux for automatic deserialization to work. The way the Foo class is currently defined, there is no destination property to inject the qux JSON object values.

public class Foo {
   private String bar;

   public String getBar() {
       return bar;
   }

   public void setBar(String bar) {
       this.bar = bar;
   }

   // additional property 
   private Qux qux;

   public Qux getQux() {
       return qux;
   }

   public void setQux(Qux value) {
       qux = value;
   }

   public static class Qux {
       private String foobar;

       public String getFoobar() {
         return foobar;
       }

       public void setFoobar(String foobar) {
           this.foobar = foobar;
       }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can configure ObjectMapper to ignore fields it doesn't find in your class with

ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
mapper.configure(DeserializationFeature.FAIL_ON_UNKNOWN_PROPERTIES, false);

If not configured this way, it will throw exceptions while parsing if it finds a field it does not recognize on the class type you specified.

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