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I have a background image that I want to overlay on it a few box-messages on specific positions. Is there a way to stick the boxes to the image so that it scales with the image and keeps it's exact position ? it probably needs to scale the font-size of the text inside the box too.

on another note, how can I change the background opacity without affecting the boxes on it.

here is a link to jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/zd3CA/

UPDATE I want the result to look like this with boxes on specific parts of the path. When the image resizes my boxes go around. It seems like it wasn't clear.

CSS

.back {
    height: 85em;
    margin-bottom: 5em;
    background: url(http://kpv.s3.amazonaws.com/static/img/film.jpg) no-repeat;
    background-size: contain;
    color: #ffffff;
    text-shadow: 1px 1px 1px #000000;
}
.box-message {
    max-width: 15em;
    min-height: 10em;
    box-sizing: border-box;
    box-shadow: 1px 0 3px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.11), -1px 0 3px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.11);
    background: #fff;
    color:#000;
    padding: 25px 25px 35px 25px;
    position: relative;
}
.flow_three {
    margin-top: 3em;
    margin-left: 5em;
}
.flow_two {
    margin-top: 3em;
    margin-left: 10em;
}
.flow_text h3 {
    color: #1BB366;
    font-size: 20px;
}
.flow_text p {
    font-size: 18px;
    line-height: 25px;
}
.back .container {
    position: relative;
    z-index: 2;
}
.container {
    width: 940px;
}

HTML

<div class="back">
    <div class="container">
        <div class="box-message flow_text flow_three">
             <h3>text</h3>

            <p>text txtegv dsf asd fsda f asdf f as df sadf .</p>
        </div>
        <div class="box-message flow_text flow_two">
             <h3>text</h3>

            <p>text txtegv dsf asd fsda f asdf f as df sadf .</p>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>
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5  
You're supposed to know already the jsFiddle will make it a lot easier for us to help you –  Itay Aug 29 '13 at 21:32
    
jsfiddle added! jsfiddle.net/zd3CA –  Kiarash Aug 29 '13 at 21:38
1  
You are going to run into a mess trying to do this all with css. Your best bet is to set the width / height / margins of the boxes when the screen is resized using jquery. If you want to do it all with css your boxes are missing width:x%. You can do margin-top:x%; etc, but its going to be really tough getting it to look like your example and scaling to match the results you are hoping to get with css alone –  Frank Aug 31 '13 at 23:15
    
actually javascript should be fine too. I just don't know it. –  Kiarash Aug 31 '13 at 23:18
    
There is no way to have a child div opaque while the parent is transparent. You will have to make the transparent image and the text-box siblings in an empty parent div, and use absolute positioning and z-index to essentially 'fake' the desired effect. –  Thomas Cheney Sep 4 '13 at 13:45
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9 Answers 9

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You simply apply the image as 'background-image' to your relative positioned (parent) container element and set 'background-size' to 'contain' (as you have already done).

Now if you define your (child) boxes with percentage width values and position them absolute also with percentage (relative) values for their positions. the whole should perfectly scale up and down.

share|improve this answer
    
the container doesn't go all width. or I could probably make it so. would you show this on jsfilddle just on one element ? –  Kiarash Sep 1 '13 at 17:29
    
Here is a Fiddle: jsfiddle.net/QDWgs –  Netsurfer Sep 1 '13 at 23:50
    
This makes use of the new Viewport units for the font-size which already have quite a good support. The padding-bottom of the container depends on the aspect-ratio of your BG image and the width of the container (e.g. see mademyday.de/css-height-equals-width-with-pure-css.html). If you might need or want to do some kind of "fine tuning" mainly depends on the Browsers (versions) you want to support. –  Netsurfer Sep 1 '13 at 23:58
    
but the font size is not changing in my chrome browser. as you said, I'm looking for a compatible solution. –  Kiarash Sep 2 '13 at 1:05
    
>>but the font size is not changing in my chrome browser. Until now there is no possibility to set the font-size according to an elelements width or height. I recommend to do this with Javascript (which is very easy) and having a CSS fallback. You can use Media Queries with as many different Breakpoints as you like to make the range of each query as small or wide as you like, and set the appropriate font-size. Even today CSS still have its limitations which can only be overcome by Javascript. –  Netsurfer Sep 2 '13 at 9:27
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If you are saying you want a background image for your form, just apply a background image via css. There is no reason to create an element behind the form as a background, unless you would plan on applying animation via js. Which even then i would suggest using AS2/AS3.

So, as i said use background image on your form via css.

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1  
You can not change the opacity of the parent element without changing the childs attribute. –  Fap Fap Fap Sep 1 '13 at 0:41
    
Solution: use a different element for background and position your other elements over that one –  19greg96 Sep 1 '13 at 0:52
    
As i said, i would suggest AS2/AS3 –  Fap Fap Fap Sep 1 '13 at 0:57
    
I am actually not clear on this and i'm not good with ui. if you don't mind, can you try this out on jsfiddle. –  Kiarash Sep 1 '13 at 4:54
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I suggest using an svg for this.

I made an example:

<svg width="640" height="480" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink">
 <!-- Created with SVG-edit - http://svg-edit.googlecode.com/ -->

 <g>
  <title>Layer 1</title>
  <image x="0" y="0" width="640" height="480" id="svg_1" xlink:href="http://kpv.s3.amazonaws.com/static/img/film.jpg"/>
  <rect fill="#FF0000" stroke="#000000" stroke-width="5" x="92" y="77" width="130" height="79" id="svg_4"/>
  <rect fill="#FF0000" stroke="#000000" stroke-width="5" x="91.5" y="213" width="130" height="79" id="svg_6"/>
  <rect fill="#FF0000" stroke="#000000" stroke-width="5" x="91.5" y="338.5" width="130" height="79" id="svg_7"/>
  <rect fill="#FF0000" stroke="#000000" stroke-width="5" x="281.5" y="195" width="186" height="113.03077" id="svg_8"/>
  <rect fill="#FF0000" stroke="#000000" stroke-width="5" x="468.5" y="31" width="161" height="97.83847" id="svg_9"/>
  <rect fill="#FF0000" stroke="#000000" stroke-width="5" x="474.50001" y="306.99999" width="144.99999" height="88.11538" id="svg_10"/>
  <text xml:space="preserve" text-anchor="middle" font-family="serif" font-size="24" id="svg_2" y="124" x="157" stroke-linecap="null" stroke-linejoin="null" stroke-dasharray="null" stroke-width="0" stroke="#000000" fill="#000000">Asd</text>
  <text id="svg_3" xml:space="preserve" text-anchor="middle" font-family="serif" font-size="24" y="262" x="155" stroke-linecap="null" stroke-linejoin="null" stroke-dasharray="null" stroke-width="0" stroke="#000000" fill="#000000">Asd</text>
  <text id="svg_5" xml:space="preserve" text-anchor="middle" font-family="serif" font-size="24" y="387" x="157" stroke-linecap="null" stroke-linejoin="null" stroke-dasharray="null" stroke-width="0" stroke="#000000" fill="#000000">Asd</text>
  <text id="svg_11" xml:space="preserve" text-anchor="middle" font-family="serif" font-size="24" y="261" x="374" stroke-linecap="null" stroke-linejoin="null" stroke-dasharray="null" stroke-width="0" stroke="#000000" fill="#000000">Asd</text>
  <text id="svg_12" xml:space="preserve" text-anchor="middle" font-family="serif" font-size="24" y="88" x="553" stroke-linecap="null" stroke-linejoin="null" stroke-dasharray="null" stroke-width="0" stroke="#000000" fill="#000000">Asd</text>
  <text id="svg_14" xml:space="preserve" text-anchor="middle" font-family="serif" font-size="24" y="357" x="548" stroke-linecap="null" stroke-linejoin="null" stroke-dasharray="null" stroke-width="0" stroke="#000000" fill="#000000">Asd</text>
 </g>
</svg>

It was created with this tool: http://svg-edit.googlecode.com/svn/branches/2.6/editor/svg-editor.html

Once your svg is done, you can simply link to it in your css background property and voila there you have it, it resizes with the containing element.

Or you could calculate each element's position and size in % relative to the containing element and write your css according to that.

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In order to achieve your desired result, first the image must share the same spatial reference (e.g. coordinate system) as the .box-message elements. This is achieved by placing the image in an tag and making it a sibling to the .box-message elements. We also need the image to be the only child element that defines the height and width of the parent. To do this, the .box-message elements are set with absolute positioning relative to the parent and the image's width is set to 100%. This allows the image to resize with the parent container and to preserve its aspect ratio.

With absolute positioning now on the .box-message elements, we set their coordinates relative to the image with the top and left properties. This will anchor the upper-left corner of the .box-message elements to a specific point on the image. To anchor the .box-message elements from their center point, you can add the transform: translate3d(-50%,-50%,0); property. You can set min/max width/height properties on the .box-message elements as well as have them resize relative to the image as well.

Lastly, the font-size can be adjusted by specifying the size in viewport units (vw and/or vh). Check out this tutorial and example: http://css-tricks.com/examples/ViewportTypography/

Whenever the viewport is adjusted, the font-size should change accordingly.

Check out this example Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/3wq25/1/

share|improve this answer
    
thanks. your jsfiddle code works great except the fonts. the boxes are on the right spots but the font is not changing and so it looks weird. –  Kiarash Sep 2 '13 at 0:59
    
@Kiarash I just noticed this too. I'm wondering if this is a result of it being within an iframe. I'll take a look and try and fix it. –  BigMacAttack Sep 2 '13 at 1:16
    
@Kiarash Apparently it is a browser bug that is easily fixed with a couple of lines of javascript. New fiddle: jsfiddle.net/3wq25/1 –  BigMacAttack Sep 2 '13 at 1:24
    
this isn't fixed. my screenshot: imgur.com/3ZQCBYh –  Kiarash Sep 2 '13 at 4:14
1  
@Kiarash you just need to adjust the font size and/or the padding/size of the text boxes, also you may want to remove the fixed height to let the boxes adjust to the content, otherwise I believe this is the right answer for your problem, though you may also want to look for a fallback for browsers that don't support viewport units –  koala_dev Sep 2 '13 at 6:23
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Update

Resize width keeping boxes in place with opaque background

You can set background image directly to an element and define background-width set to cover to have an image cover the background proportionally.

However, this does not project any children element that are pinned to certain position.

In addition - one cannot set separate opacity for background image. One need to set it on the element the image is attached to which means it will affect children elements as well.

To solve this one can:

  • Edit the image itself and save out with desired opacity as PNG.
  • One can modify the opacity using canvas (see solution for this below)
  • Or one can use an image element as child to that element. This latter is effective enough for this case (and more effective than using canvas).

Here is a solution that is simple but effective (there are issues in Firefox as this browser do not support the necessary CSS property at the moment but, a possible option is provided).

HTML:

A small re-structure of the html code:

<div id="container">
    <img src="http://kpv.s3.amazonaws.com/static/img/film.jpg" width="794" height="477" />
    <div class="box-message flow_one">Ipsum lorem dummy text.
        <br>Ipsum lorem dummy text.
        <br>Ipsum lorem dummy text.
        <br>
    </div>
    <div class="box-message flow_two">Ipsum lorem dummy text.
        <br>Ipsum lorem dummy text.
        <br>Ipsum lorem dummy text.
        <br>
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

html, body {
    width:100%;
    height:100%;
    margin:0;
    padding:0;
}

/* Important: use fixed width/height for container */
#container {
    position:relative;
    width:794;
    height:477;
}

/* Let image follow width 100% and height auto-adjusted */
#container > img {
    width:100%;
    height:auto;
    opacity:0.5;
}

.box-message {
    position:absolute;
    border:2px solid #000;
    border-radius:7px;
    background:rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.85);
    padding:7px;
}
.flow_one {
    left:12%;
    top:10%;
}
.flow_two {
    left:50%;
    top:42%;
}

(The only reason why image is separate here is to allow a different opacity for the the children elements.)

Additional tip: if you need to have different font sizes relative to device screen you can override the font-size using @media queries.

JavaScript:

We need a small snippet with JavaScript to calculate the width ratio compared to image / background width.

This ratio is then used for the zoom property for the CSS rule which we set programmatic as this will scale parent and everything in it (for Firefox we need to use transform:scale(f), however this has issues as it seem to accumulate with current width of background).

/// init parent element at load
redraw();

/// call everytime we resize
window.onresize = redraw;

/// calc ratio for zoom
function redraw() {
    /// ratio f = window width / background width (hard-coded for demo)
    var f = window.innerWidth / 794;
    //FF: container.style.transform = 'scale(' + f + ')';
    container.style.zoom = f.toFixed(2);
}

ONLINE DEMO HERE (for Chrome and other browsers supporting CSS zoom)

Update 2

As no matter how you twist and turn things you will run into compatibility problems with this approach as well with CSS approach. One browser supports one thing, another browser another thing but not the first etc. They are just not there yet.

The more solid approach (looking away from older IE browsers) is to perform manual calculation of the element's positions, size, font etc. using pure JavaScript or a wrapper such as jQuery.

One can check if browser is capable of using for example zoom by testing like this:

if (typeof container.style.zoom === 'undefined') {

    /// manually calculate relations

} else {
    container.style.zoom = factor;
}

Of course, the calculation part is a more tedious than shown here as you need to iterate through the elements and so forth in a way suitable for your final solution.

Opacity

If separate image element nor background image (pre-defined opacity) is an option then this solution provides an option for that. Note that this is not very efficient in this scenario with resizing but can be a last-resort solution.

Here is an example using canvas:

var img = document.createElement('img'),

    canvas = document.createElement('canvas'),
    ctx = canvas.getContext('2d'),

    opacity = 0.5;

/// when image has loaded and a resize event occured
img.onload = window.onresize = draw;

/// resize canvas and draw image at given opacity
function draw() {

    /// set canvas = window client size
    canvas.width = window.innerWidth;
    canvas.height = window.innerHeight;

    /// set opacity of canvas
    ctx.globalAlpha = opacity;

    /// draw image to canvas size
    ctx.drawImage(img, 0, 0, canvas.width, canvas.height);

    /// set background to resized image
    container.style.background = 'url(' + canvas.toDataURL() + ') no-repeat left top';
}

/// request cross-origin sharing (if different domain than page)
img.crossOrigin = 'anonymous';

/// set image source and start loading image
img.src = 'http://i.imgur.com/Y77lhhL.jpg';

ONLINE DEMO HERE

Notes: For this to work you need to fulfill CORS requirements (cross-origin resource sharing). This means either that the image is loaded from the some origin (domain, path) - or - if loaded from another origin that the server allow cross-origin sharing.

You can see for the fiddle demo that the original image link you provided won't work with this approach so I moved the image to imgur.com which allows cross-origin sharing and it works.

share|improve this answer
    
For the first part, I didn't mean zooming the browser. I meant re-sizing the browser. (read mobile-compatible although I just care about different screen sizes) your opacity solution is clever. –  Kiarash Sep 2 '13 at 4:10
    
just to be clear, I want this to be the width of the screen, no matter what size the screen is. –  Kiarash Sep 2 '13 at 4:15
    
@Kiarash I updated the CSS and fiddle in the answer. I also added a note if you want adjustment to be proportional. –  Ken Fyrstenberg Sep 2 '13 at 5:53
    
but that one stretches the photo. it should keep the photos aspect ratio. –  Kiarash Sep 2 '13 at 6:18
    
@Kiarash ok, answer is updated with new solution that prioritizes width and scales everything else accordingly. –  Ken Fyrstenberg Sep 2 '13 at 8:16
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The solution is possible using fluid units like % and em and using absolute position.

The styles are:

*,html{
margin:0px;
padding:0px;
}
.back {
   height: 51em;
   margin-bottom: 5em;
   background: url(http://kpv.s3.amazonaws.com/static/img/film.jpg) no-repeat;
   background-size: contain;
   color: #ffffff;
   text-shadow: 1px 1px 1px #000000;
   width: 60%;
  }
  .back .container {
   position: relative;
   z-index: 2;
  }
  .container {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
   }
  .box-message {

    box-sizing: border-box;
    box-shadow: 1px 0 3px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.11), -1px 0 3px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.11);
    background: #fff;
    color: #000;
    padding: 1% 2%;
   width: 26.66%;
  }
  .flow_three {
    margin-top: 5%;
    margin-left: 5%;
    position: absolute;
  }
  .flow_two {
  margin-top: 1%;
  float: right;
  right: 2%;
  position: absolute;
  }
  .flow_center{
  position: absolute;
  margin-top: 26%;
  margin-left: 44%;
  }
  .flow_text h3 {
   color: #1BB366; 
   font-size: 1.25em;
   }
   .flow_text p {
     font-size: 1.125em;
     line-height: 95%;
    }

The html is

<div class="back">
<div class="container">
    <div class="box-message flow_text flow_three">
         <h3>text</h3>

        <p>text txtegv dsf asd fsda f asdf f as df sadf .</p>
    </div>
    <div class="box-message flow_text flow_two">
         <h3>text</h3>

        <p>text txtegv dsf asd fsda f asdf f as df sadf .</p>
    </div>
    <div class="box-message flow_text flow_center">
         <h3>text</h3>

        <p>text txtegv dsf asd fsda f asdf f as df sadf .</p>
    </div>
    </div>
 </div>
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So... doesn't anybody realize it's this easy?

CSS:

.img {
background-image:url('image.jpg');
width: 100%;
height: 200px;
padding: 200px;
margin: 0px;
}

HTML:

<table class="img"><tr><td>

<h1>Text Here</h1>

<h3>Text Here</h3>

</td></tr></table>
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I would do this with lettering.js. http://letteringjs.com/

Set the default text size and then keep the box size relative by adding padding.

Both should scale easily.

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.should_work_on_any_browser{ /*For Opacity*/
    min-height: 100px;
    margin: auto;
    -moz-opacity: 0.52;
    opacity: 0.52;
    -ms-filter:"progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha"(Opacity=52);
    position:relative;
}
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