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I have a directory, with many sub-directories, variable depth, always growing. I only want to keep ONE particular file. How do I tell .gitignore to ignore all files from these directory and sub directories except that one?

Exactly, what I have is a report directory where I daily store many reports. Each new report creates a new sub directory, with a variable name, whith files and sub directories within. I only want to keep the file 'foo'

  • REPORTDIRECTORY
    • MONTH_A
      • DAY_HOUR_OF_REPORT
        • file_1
        • file_2
        • foo
        • file_N
        • ANOTHER_DIRECTORY_I_COMPLETELY_IGNORE
      • DAY_HOUR_OF_REPORT
        • file_1
        • file_2
        • foo
        • file_N
        • ANOTHER_DIRECTORY_I_COMPLETELY_IGNORE
    • MONTH_B
      • DAY_HOUR_OF_REPORT

And so on

I have tried many things. Last ones where

/REPORTDIRECTORY/**/*
!foo

and

/REPORTDIRECTORY/**/*
!/REPORTDIRECTORY/**/foo

with no success.

I am starting to belive i'm having trouble with double wildcard, because if i put in gitignore:

/REPORTDIRECTORY/**/ANOTHER_DIRECTORY_I_COMPLETELY_IGNORE/

or

REPORTDIRECTORY/**/ANOTHER_DIRECTORY_I_COMPLETELY_IGNORE

this 'ANOTHER_DIRECTORY_I_COMPLETELY_IGNORE' is not ignored :(

I'm using Git version 1.8.1.2-preview20130201 for Windows. I'm using SmartGit for Windows as GUI (version 4.5), but I suppose the GUI should not be important as .gitignore is directly parsed by Git. Git manual page states double asterisk wildcard should work.

Am I doing something wrong or is it the .gitignore parser?

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2 Answers 2

Is there a chance you need to update to the latest version? According to the website, **/ patterns were only supported from 1.8.2 onward.

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Ignoring versioned files

Some files in a repository, which are versioned (i.e. they can't be git-ignored), are often changed, but rarely committed. Usually these are various local configuration files that are edited, but should never be committed upstream.

Git lets you ignore those files by assuming they are unchanged. This is done by running the git update-index --assume-unchanged path/to/file.txt command. Once marking a file as such, git will completely ignore any changes on that file; they will not show up when running git status or git diff, nor will they ever be committed.

To make git track the file again, simply run git update-index --no-assume-unchanged path/to/file.txt.

This is directly from the github's website

Then you can commit the one file as needed, occasionally. And still ignore generally those changes.

With the addition of a .gitignore file in the folder that you are trying to partially ignore, this seems like it would be a reasonable solution.

The content of the .gitignoe file in the folder may probably just include the one entry:

*/

If it is all folders that are to be ignored.

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