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I'm very new to C, this is a test program that i'm trying to make work. The purpose is to put the characters from one dynamically generated matrix into another. The code i've got compiles but never finishes running.

When I comment out the loop at the bottom it will do the printf statement fine, but when I uncomment it it just keeps running and doesn't print. I though C worked sequentially? If something in the loop is broken why is it affecting the printf statement?

Here is the code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>


void main (void)
{
int n,m,i;
char **matrix = (char**) malloc(m * sizeof(char*));
    for ( i = 0; i < m; i++ )
    {
    matrix[i] = (char*) malloc(n * sizeof(char));
    }

char **oldMatrix = (char**) malloc(m * sizeof(char*));
    for ( i = 0; i < m; i++ )
    {
    oldMatrix[i] = (char*) malloc(n * sizeof(char));
    }   

n=1; 
m=2;    
int indc;
matrix[n][m];
matrix[1][1]='1';
matrix[1][2]='2';
oldMatrix[1][2];
printf("%c %c",matrix[1][1],matrix[1][2]);

int r=0;    

            for (indc=0; indc<=1; indc++)
            {
            printf("4");
            oldMatrix[r][indc]=matrix[r][indc];
            }

}
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What is m set to be? –  dcaswell Aug 29 '13 at 23:27
    
Are you sure you're compiling this as C code and not C++? –  Mario Aug 29 '13 at 23:27
1  
Where did you get the idea that void main(void) is correct? It isn't (except perhaps for some embedded systems). The correct definition is int main(void). If you have a C book that suggests void main(void)`, please tell us which one it is so we can warn people away from it. –  Keith Thompson Aug 29 '13 at 23:28
1  
Activate warnings in your compiler, it will save you lots of trouble. If you use gcc, pass -Wall to the compiler. –  BSH Aug 29 '13 at 23:30
1  
and turn on -Wall to turn on warnings when you compile. you should have a huge number of warnings, several which say you're using m, n before assigning them values. (edit: ack! @sp beat my be seconds! great minds think alike!) –  John Gardner Aug 29 '13 at 23:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Multiple problems here:

First problem: You're using both m and n before assigning them any valid value (so their initial value is most likely huge).

Second problem: You're running out of bounds:

n=1; 
m=2;    

matrix[n][m];     // this line doesn't do anything
matrix[1][1]='1';
matrix[1][2]='2';

In C (and C++) array indexes start at 0, so the first element in an array would be 0, the last one would be one below the number of elements (e.g. an array with x elements will essentially go from array[0] to array[x-1]).

If your array has one element (matrix[n] which resolves to matrix[1]) you're only able to access matrix[0], matrix[1] will be out of bounds (i.e. undefined behavior; don't do it!).

Third problem: The way you're allocating your pointers you're swapping dimensions: matrix will have m elements and every array stored within will have n elements. Your other code expects the exact opposite.

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+1 for spotting the mismatch between the use of m and n (as well as being a good answer generally). –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 29 '13 at 23:41

First, You are doing malloc calls in the main() without assigning values to m and n. Move n=1 and m=2 statements before the malloc calls.

Second, with these values of n and m and definition of matrix[n][m], you cannot access matrix[1][1] and matrix[1][2] -- the maximum index would need to be n-1 and m-1 since C uses zero-based index to access array elements.

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Easy one - m is uninitialized.

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... and n 5 MORE TO GO –  user9000 Aug 29 '13 at 23:43

Primary rule: assign value before using any variable. In your m, m is not initialised. Some compiler in debug may help you initialise the variables. but most don't.

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