Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

After trying to test the following function, i have determined the line commented out gives a seg fault when i try to run the program:

uint8_t ll_push_front(struct List *list, int value){
        if (list == NULL)
                return 1;
        struct ListEntry *node = (struct ListEntry *) malloc (sizeof(struct ListEntry));
        if (node == NULL) exit (1);
        if (list->head_ == NULL || list->tail_ == NULL || list->size_ == 0) {
                list->head_ = node;
                list->tail_ = node;
                node->prev_ = NULL;
                node->next_ = NULL;
    // =====>>  *(node_->val_) = value;
                ++(list->size_);
                return 0;
        }
        list->head_->prev_ = node;
        node->next_ = list->head_;
        node->prev_ = NULL;
        *(node->val_) = value;
        list->head_ = node;
        ++(list->size_);
        return 0;
}

what is wrong with doing *(node_->val_) = value and how should it be properly declared?

here are the structs:

struct ListEntry {
    struct ListEntry * next_;  // The next item in the linked list
    struct ListEntry * prev_;  // The next item in the linked list
    int * val_;                // The value for this entry
};

/* Lists consist of a chain of list entries linked between head and tail */
struct List {
    struct ListEntry * head_;  // Pointer to the front/head of the list
    struct ListEntry * tail_;  // Pointer to the end/tail of the list
    unsigned size_;            // The size of the list
};

This is how i initilize the list:

void ll_init(struct List **list) {
        *list = (struct List *) malloc (sizeof(struct List));
        if (list == NULL) exit (1);
        (*list)->head_ = 0;
        (*list)->tail_ = 0;
        (*list)->size_ = 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
How is node_ declared and where is it set? –  lurker Aug 30 '13 at 0:55
    
Need to know how you have defined the structures –  Ed Heal Aug 30 '13 at 0:56
2  
If val_ is an int, then you should do node_->val_ = value; –  UncleO Aug 30 '13 at 0:56
2  
Your val_ member is an int pointer (int *). Did you allocate it some memory? The code I see doesn't. And in fact, it seems to be using whatever value happens to be in that pointer after your node-level malloc(). This is called an indeterminate pointer, and usage of it for eval or assignment is undefined behavior. Finally, I fail to see why it is a pointer in the first place. it would seem a regular int should suffice. –  WhozCraig Aug 30 '13 at 1:06
    
If you use a pointer to val then you must check this pointer before an assignment, I think. –  someuser Aug 30 '13 at 1:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As you have decided to use an pointer to an integer you need to malloc that as well.

i.e.

struct ListEntry *node =  malloc (sizeof(struct ListEntry));

Then

node->val_  = malloc(sizeof(int));

This will make

*(node->val_) = value 

Work

Alternatively use

struct ListEntry {
    struct ListEntry * next_;  // The next item in the linked list
    struct ListEntry * prev_;  // The next item in the linked list
    int val_;                // The value for this entry (no pointer)
};

Then

node->val_ = value

Will work

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much. Looks like it works now –  user2481095 Aug 30 '13 at 1:16

You can use memcpy(node_->val_, &value), but what's your purpose, why not declare node_->val_ to int

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.