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I'm using ClosedXML to create a excel spreadsheet. The issue takes place while formatting cells, containg percentages.

The format I came up to is 0.##%.

It works well when the decimal part is not zero, it shows: 1,15%; but when it's integral-valued, it leaves the decimal separator visible, while hiding zeroes, for example: 5,%.

How can I make it hide the decimal separator as well?

Here is a small program, demonstrating the issue:

XLWorkbook wb = new XLWorkbook();
var ws = wb.AddWorksheet("test");

string format = "0.##%";

var cell = ws.Cell(1, 1);
cell.SetValue(5.2M / 100);
cell.Style.NumberFormat.Format = format;

cell = ws.Cell(1, 2);
cell.SetValue(5M / 100);
cell.Style.NumberFormat.Format = format;

wb.SaveAs("test.xlsx");

and the output is

enter image description here

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What does the format string "#.##%" produce? –  Jason Aug 30 '13 at 1:42
    
@Jason I use 0.##%, not #.##% as your variant would not print zero at all; compare 0,5% and ,5%. And the prolblem remains, as it also prints the decimal separator –  horgh Aug 30 '13 at 1:45
3  
Then I would suggest using conditional formatting. The format string doesn't seem to support what you want to achieve. Not that I can see. closedxml.codeplex.com/… –  Jason Aug 30 '13 at 1:49
    
Best source I can locate on this is ozgrid.com/Excel/CustomFormats.htm –  Jason Aug 30 '13 at 1:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Many thanks to Jason for the link to CLOSED XML: Conditional Formatting!

Thanks to this I managed to find the way to apply conditional formatting I needed:

cell.AddConditionalFormat()
    .WhenEquals(
        string.Format(
            "=TRUNC(${0}${1})", 
            cell.WorksheetColumn().ColumnLetter(),
            cell.WorksheetRow().RowNumber()))
    .NumberFormat
    .Format = "general\"%\"";

I gave up using percent format specifier, as it makes me divide by 100. From Excel Custom Number Formats:

% Percentage. Microsoft Excel multiplies by 100 and adds the % character.

Now I simply add % as a string, not as a format specifier.

So the main number format is 0.##\"%\", but when the value's decimal part is zero, I substitute the number format to the general one with % in the end using conditional formatting.

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