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I have a method that tries to get a web page. I want to attempt to get it several times so I built a wrapper around it to retry several times. In the method called I catch and then ignore the exception returning null. Therefore, after the first attempt the retries will occur. Here is the called method:

internal static async Task<string> WebClientAsync(string URI, NetworkCredential Creds = null, Dictionary.FantasySite Site = Dictionary.FantasySite.Other)
{
    if (Creds == null)
    {
        try
        {   //attempt to get the web page
            HttpClient client = new HttpClient(); //create client
            HttpResponseMessage response = await client.GetAsync(URI);  //get response
            response.EnsureSuccessStatusCode(); //ensure the response is good (or throw Exception)
            return await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();  //return the string back
        }
        catch (HttpRequestException)
        {
            //MessageBox.Show(string.Format("\nHttpRequestException Caught!\nMessage :{0} for URI {1}.", e.Message, URI));
            return null;  //Catch the exception because we wrapped this and are trying again (null is the indicator it didn't work)
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            //MessageBox.Show(string.Format("\nException Caught!\nMessage :{0} for URI {1}.", e.Message, URI)); //TODO - THis hasn't happened, but remove it for production
            return null; //Catch the exception because we wrapped this and are trying again  (null is the indicator it didn't work)
        }
    }

}

If this still fails after all the retries then I want to throw the exception, but since I threw it away, I can't. Here is the calling method.

internal static async Task<string> WebClientRetryAsync(string URI, NetworkCredential Creds = null, Dictionary.FantasySite Site = Dictionary.FantasySite.Other)
{
    string webPage = null;
    for (int i = 0; i < Dictionary.WEB_PAGE_ATTEMPTS; i++)  //Attempt to get the webpage x times
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.Print(string.Format("WebClientRetryAsync attempt {0} for {1}", i + 1, URI));
        //wait some time before retrying just in case we are too busy
        //Start wait at 0 for first time and multiply with each successive failure to slow down process by multiplying by i squared
        Thread.Sleep(Wait.Next(i * i * Dictionary.RETRY_WAIT_MS));
        webPage = await WebClientAsync(URI, Creds, Site);
        if (webPage != null) { break; } //don't attempt again if success
    }
    /*TODO - If webPage is null we didn't have success and need to throw an exception.  
     * This is done in the calls to this method and should be done here, move code over */
    return webPage;
}

Can someone suggest if this is a bad approach and how I could refactor the code to throw the exception after failing too many times? Should I pass the exception to the calling method and ignore it until the retries have run out?

share|improve this question
    
You could have a custom class/struct which is returned from WebClientAsync - it has 2 properties/instance fields, one for the exception and one for the webpage string –  andrewb Aug 30 '13 at 2:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yup. You should not throw away exceptions that you wish to rethrow. One possible approach is the following (trying to make a minimal amount of modifications to your current code):

internal static async Task<string> WebClientAsync(string URI, NetworkCredential Creds = null, Dictionary.FantasySite Site = Dictionary.FantasySite.Other)
{
    // If (Creds == null) removed, you must return a task or throw an exception.

    //attempt to get the web page
    HttpClient client = new HttpClient(); //create client
    HttpResponseMessage response = await client.GetAsync(URI);  //get response
    response.EnsureSuccessStatusCode(); //ensure the response is good (or throw Exception)
    return await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();  //return the string back
}

internal static async Task<string> WebClientRetryAsync(string URI, NetworkCredential Creds = null, Dictionary.FantasySite Site = Dictionary.FantasySite.Other)
{
    // assumes you have .NET 4.5, otherwise save exception.
    // uses System.Runtime.ExceptionServices;
    ExceptionDispatchInfo exceptionDispatchInfo = null; 

    for (int i = 0; i < Dictionary.WEB_PAGE_ATTEMPTS; i++)  //Attempt to get the webpage x times
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.Print(string.Format("WebClientRetryAsync attempt {0} for {1}", i + 1, URI));
        try
        {
            var webPage = await WebClientAsync(URI, Creds, Site);
            return webPage;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            // save exception so it can be rethrown.
            exceptionDispatchInfo = ExceptionDispatchInfo.Capture(ex);
        }
        // Edit: also need to do an async wait (no thread.sleep):
        if (i < Dictionary.WEB_PAGE_ATTEMPTS - 1)
        {
            //wait some time before retrying just in case we are too busy
            //Start wait at 0 for first time and multiply with each successive failure to slow down process by multiplying by i squared
            await Task.Delay(Wait.Next(i * i * Dictionary.RETRY_WAIT_MS));
        }
    }
    Debug.Assert(exceptionDispatchInfo != null); // shouldn't be null if we get here.
    exceptionDispatchInfo.Throw();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I didn't know of this class. Is there a reason you caught it in the calling method vs passing it back in a custom class? –  Harrison Aug 30 '13 at 2:33
1  
@Harrison Well yes, since there is no code actually handling or doing anything with the exceptions, it also should not try to catch them. By catching them in the "Retry" function, they can be saved, you know that you need to retry and they can be rethrown. General advise: don't catch exceptions if you do not act on them. –  Alex Aug 30 '13 at 2:58
    
That makes sense. Thanks again. Looks like a good solution. –  Harrison Aug 30 '13 at 3:00
1  
@Harrison made another small modification. Change the Thread.Sleep to a Task.Delay. –  Alex Aug 30 '13 at 3:09

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