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I want a secure solution for caching a user's password on their PC during their session.

I have trawled numerous AES examples and know that this has been answered elsewhere but I must say it is a little confusing. My aesSecretKey or aesInitialisationVector are not working in the decryption correctly but not sure where the issue lies.

Decrypting results in a javax.crypto.BadPaddingException: Given final block not properly padded exception.

My class looks like this

public class LockManagerTest {
    // Need to share the IV and key between encode and decode
    private static byte[] aesInitialisationVector;
    private static SecretKey aesSecretKey;
    private static Cipher aesCipher;

    public LockManagerTest(String sessionKey) {
        try {
            byte[] key = getSecretKey(sessionKey.toCharArray(), getSalt(32),
                                      65536, 128);
            aesSecretKey = new SecretKeySpec(key, "AES");
            aesCipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding");
            aesCipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, aesSecretKey);
            AlgorithmParameters params = aesCipher.getParameters();
            aesInitialisationVector =
                    params.getParameterSpec(IvParameterSpec.class).getIV();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            Util.handleException(e);
        }
    }

    private static byte[] getSecretKey(char[] plaintext,
                                       byte[] salt,
                                       int iterations,
                                       int keySize)
            throws Exception {
        PBEKeySpec spec = new PBEKeySpec(plaintext, salt, iterations, keySize);
        SecretKeyFactory skf = SecretKeyFactory.getInstance("PBKDF2WithHmacSHA1");
        return skf.generateSecret(spec).getEncoded();
    }

    private static byte[] getSalt(int keyLength) throws Exception {
        SecureRandom random = SecureRandom.getInstance("SHA1PRNG", "SUN");
        byte[] salt = new byte[keyLength];
        random.nextBytes(salt);
        return salt;
    }

    public byte[] encryptedAes(char[] input) throws Exception {
        // WRONG
        // aesCipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, aesSecretKey);
        //
        aesCipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, aesSecretKey, 
                       new IvParameterSpec(aesInitialisationVector);
        CharBuffer cBuf = CharBuffer.wrap(input);
        byte[] normalised = Charset.forName("UTF-8").encode(cBuf).array();
        byte[] ciphertext = aesCipher.doFinal(normalised);
        return ciphertext;
    }

    public byte[] decryptAes(byte[] ciphertext) throws Exception {
        aesCipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE,
                aesSecretKey, new IvParameterSpec(aesInitialisationVector));
        byte[] plaintext = aesCipher.doFinal(ciphertext);
        return plaintext;
    }
}

Comments regarding the level of security appreciated also.

share|improve this question
    
Why? You should just cache an expiring session cookie of some kind. –  EJP Aug 30 '13 at 3:26
    
@EJP Session cookie won't open a PKCS#12 keystore. This is not for a webapp –  drew Aug 30 '13 at 4:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to pass the IV when calling init() in encryptedAes().

share|improve this answer
    
Updated code above with correct answer –  drew Aug 30 '13 at 6:31

AES is a CBC algorithm and divides input into blocks. These blocks must be of a specific size. In the case of AES, I believe it is 16 bytes. If the input is not a multiple of 16 bytes, it must be padded with nulls before encryption.

share|improve this answer
    
My Cipher uses PKCS5Padding, I thought it took care of the padding. I have this same code operational in a single function and there isn't any issue. Are you sure it isn't a difference in the IV or aes key between the encrypt and decrypt? –  drew Aug 30 '13 at 2:47
    
One question... your key is salted. Is the same instance of this class used during encrypt and decrypt? If not, your key is changing since one component of it is the random salt. If the salt were obtained through a seed value, you could ensure the same key was generated between instances. –  Centijo Aug 30 '13 at 4:22
    
The aesSecretKey is static set in constructor. My test instantiates an object and calls encrypt and decrypt. –  drew Aug 30 '13 at 4:39
1  
Your encryptedAES() function calls init without including the original IV. Your IV changes there. I missed that the first few times I read through. –  Centijo Aug 30 '13 at 5:40
    
Your are awesome all running smooth :). Any idea why the exact same code ran in a single method? Ie encode(Mode, key) -- without the IV!! –  drew Aug 30 '13 at 6:30

Instead of generating new IV while decrypting, you need to pass same IV which you use for encrypting. Remember AES is Symmetric Cipher.

Edit: What you are doing is:

public byte[] encryptedAes(char[] input) throws Exception {
        // WRONG
        // aesCipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, aesSecretKey);
        //
        aesCipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, aesSecretKey, 
                       new IvParameterSpec(aesInitialisationVector);
        CharBuffer cBuf = CharBuffer.wrap(input);
        byte[] normalised = Charset.forName("UTF-8").encode(cBuf).array();
        byte[] ciphertext = aesCipher.doFinal(normalised);
        return ciphertext;
}

Instead store the IvParameterSpec as a static, as per below (u can do proper variable declaration in your program)

    public byte[] encryptedAes(char[] input) throws Exception {
//declare as static so initVector can be reused when decrypting
         IvParamterSpec initVector = new IvParameterSpec(aesSecretKey);       
            aesCipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, aesSecretKey, initVector);
            CharBuffer cBuf = CharBuffer.wrap(input);
            byte[] normalised = Charset.forName("UTF-8").encode(cBuf).array();
            byte[] ciphertext = aesCipher.doFinal(normalised);
            return ciphertext;
        }

make the changes and then run your program. make sure you use the same initVector while decrypting. in your program you are creating new IvParameterSpec(...)

share|improve this answer
    
The IV is static and set in the constructor. The encrypt and decrypt access the same static variable from the same object instance. How can this generate a new IV? –  drew Aug 30 '13 at 4:40
    
@drew i edited my code. now compare and check with yours. –  H-Patel Aug 30 '13 at 7:32
    
The code is working with the new IvParamterSpec(aesSecretKey) in the cipher init. Are you sure this is an issue? I believe the IvParamaterSpec will be functionally identical given the same key. I'm no expert (by a long way) so hopefully someone can clear this up. Thanks –  drew Aug 30 '13 at 8:23
    
@drew What harm will it have if you make changes to your code and then run? By the way, i did studied Cryptography. Why don't u run your ORIGINAL code and check output on IvParameterSpec in encryption and decryption method and see. –  H-Patel Aug 30 '13 at 8:43

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