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I have a 1GB file full of artist names and their songs delimited by tabs.

Artist1    Song1    Song2    Song3 ...
Artist2    Song1    Song2    Song3 ...

And I want to split the large file into 26 different smaller files alphabetically.

e.g. I want all the artists starting with A in a file called artists_A.txt, all the artists starting with B in a file called artists_B.txt etc.

I know about the sort and split commands, but is there a way to lever the split command to split under certain conditions? Also, I'd rather not read in each line individually and put it in the correct file if there's an easier way.

Also, curious if there's a way to do this in Python.

EDIT: I think csplit might be the answer to my question.

EDIT: AWK is the program to be working with when using whitespace delimited data! :)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
awk '{ print >> "artists_"toupper(substr($1, 1, 1))".txt" }' < songs.txt
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Thanks! This worked perfectly, I'm having some troubles understanding it though. What I think so far is that the print is printing each line to a file "artists_X.txt" but I'm not exactly sure how it's determining when it's on the next letter and to start printing to the next file. –  ishikun Aug 30 '13 at 4:45
    
Nevermind, I think I got it :). –  ishikun Aug 30 '13 at 4:46
1  
It doesn't, because it doesn't need to. It appends each line to the appropriate file. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Aug 30 '13 at 4:46
    
+1 for the cleverness –  Vince Aug 30 '13 at 5:07

I know about the sort and split commands, but is there a way to lever the split command to split under certain conditions?

Yes, split() takes an optional delimiter argument. For example, split(",") splits by commas. There's also splitlines(), which handles the mess of splitting lines cross-platform.

Also, I'd rather not read in each line individually and put it in the correct file if there's an easier way.

I always recommend against having more than one file object open in any code. It's a recipe for disaster.

Also, curious if there's a way to do this in Python.

Try this.

# Read input file
with open("artists.txt") as in_file:
    artists = in_file.read().splitlines()

# Make the data structure you want
artists_sorted = {letter: [] for letter in "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"}
for artist in artists:
    artists_sorted[artist[0].lower()].append(artist)

# Write output files
for letter, value in artists_sorted.iteritems():
    with open("artists_%s.txt" % letter.upper(), "w") as out_file:
        out_file.write("\n".join(value))
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split(1) is a command found in GNU Coreutils. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Aug 30 '13 at 3:27
    
Oh, sorry. Thought he was asking about the Python string method. –  PattimusPrime Aug 30 '13 at 3:29
    
Thanks for showing me a way to do it in python! I went with Ignacio's answer because I didn't want to have to load the entire file into memory (the file is really big!). –  ishikun Aug 30 '13 at 6:04

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