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Consider the following class

class myClass {

   private $model;

    public function update($input) {
        return $this->model->update($input);
    }

    public function find($id) {
        $this->model = ORMfind($id);
    }
}

How do I prevent

$myClass = new myClass;
$myClass->update($input);

The problem isn't HOW to use the above code but how to make update() a method only callable after find().

EDIT: I changed what my method does so it was more clearly understood that I need to do one method (find()) before another (update())

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2  
Yeah, don't abuse state like that. The problem disappears if you leave state out of your class. Which is typically the better way of handling it... –  ircmaxell Aug 30 '13 at 16:03

4 Answers 4

You could add a flag to your code like so:

class myClass {

  private $model;
  private $canUpdate = 0;

  public function update($input) {
    if ($canUpdate === 0) return; // or throw an exception here
    return $this->model->update($input);
  }

  public function find($id) {
    $this->model = ORMfind($id);
    $canUpdate = 1;
  }

}

Setting the flag $canUpdate will caution the update() method to react accordingly. If update() is called, you can throw an exception or exit out of the method if the flag is still 0.

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To prevent from returning null value by get :

public function get() {
    if (isset($this->value)) return $this->value;
    else echo "please give me a value ";

 }

You can also create a construct:

 function __construct($val){
    $this->value=$val;  
 } 

and then give a value to your $value without using set() method:

 $myClass=new myClass(10);  
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Outputting text, returning void, I think all of this is wrong. When you do not expect something to happen, you should throw an exception:

class MyClass {
    private $canUpdate = false;

    public function find($id) {
        // some code...
        $this->canUpdate = true;
    }

    public function canUpdate() {
        return $this->canUpdate;
    }

    private function testCanUpdate() {
        if (!$this->canUpdate()) {
            throw new Exception('You cannot update');
        }
    }

    public function update($inpjut) {
        $this->testCanUpdate();

        // ... some code
    }
}

Now you can do:

$obj = new MyClass();

try {
    $obj->update($input);
} catch (Exception $e) {
    $obj->find($id);
    $obj->update($input);
}
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The proper way to make sure ->update() can only be called when the model has been initialized is to turn it into a dependency:

class myClass 
{
    private $model;

    public function __construct($id)
    {
        $this->model = ORMfind($id);
    }

    public function update($input) {
        return $this->model->update($input);
    }
}

$x = new myClass('123');

Alternatively, if you have multiple find operations, you could introduce them as static constructor methods:

class myClass 
{
    private $model;

    private function __construct($model)
    {
        $this->model = $model;
    }

    public function update($input) {
        return $this->model->update($input);
    }

    public static function find($id)
    {
        return new self(ORMfind($id));
    }
}

$x = myClass::find('123');

Update

Tackling your immediate problem can be done by a simple check:

    public function update($input) {
        return $this->model ? $this->model->update($input) : null;
    }
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