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I want to make a variable that I can use inside my method to change that variable outside my method. As a visual: (I imported the scanner class by the way)

public static void main(String[] args) {

    int quitVar = 1;
    Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);

    class IWantToQuit {
        public void quit() {
            quitVar++; //This is the problem area.
        }
    }
    IWantToQuit quiter = new IWantToQuit();
    while (quitVar == 1) {
        System.out.println("HELLO");
    System.out.println("Type QUIT to quit.");
    choice = scan.next();
    if (choice.equals("QUIT")) {
        quiter.quit();
    }

For some reason, it says that the local variable quitVar is accessed by the inner class but it needs to be declared and I have declared it. Any help is appreciated.

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@Nambari yeah i proove i didn't know xD – nachokk Aug 30 '13 at 3:30

This local inner class because defined inside method. Rules for local inner class are:

A local class has access to the members of its enclosing class.

In addition, a local class has access to local variables. However, a local class can only access local variables that are declared final.

In this case quitVar is local variable, so you need to declare it as final to access it inside local class. But if you declare it final, you can't increment.

If you want this variable accessible, then define as class variable rather than local variable.

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If I can't increment it, can I still assign it an new value with "="? – Skyop22 Aug 30 '13 at 3:30
    
@Jacob: If you declare it as final, you can't even assign something else using =. – Nambari Aug 30 '13 at 3:31
    
Ok. How would on go about defining a variable as an instance variable rather than local? – Skyop22 Aug 30 '13 at 3:33
    
+1, but ` In the previous example, the PhoneNumber constructor accesses the member LocalClassExample.regularExpression` has no sense in your answer is out of context hihi – nachokk Aug 30 '13 at 3:33
    
@nachokk: Fixed it. I just copied it from link in answer. – Nambari Aug 30 '13 at 3:35

Other people are offering you solutions but really what you're trying to do isn't a good idea.

Global variables are widely recognised as an anti pattern by most developers - so maybe there's something else we can do.

You're incrementing something but testing for 1 so if it gets called twice your code won't trigger.

If you change the int to a boolean, make it a member variable of the quitter with an accessor it'll work much better.

public static void main(String[] args) {

    Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);

    class IWantToQuit {
        private boolean hasQuit = false;
        public void quit() {
            hasQuit = true;
        }

        boolean hasQuit() {
            return hasQuit;
        }
    }

    IWantToQuit quiter = new IWantToQuit();
    while (!quiter.hasQuit()) {
        System.out.println("HELLO");
        System.out.println("Type QUIT to quit.");
        String choice = scan.next();
        if (choice.equals("QUIT")) {
           quiter.quit();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for adding different perspective. – Nambari Aug 30 '13 at 3:47

Declare the variable quitVar outside the main() method and declare the variable as static

Declaring Member Variable

Variable Scope

static variable

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