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I have this piece of code here:

Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
int array[] = new int[10];

System.out.println("Enter the numbers now.");

for (int i = 0 ; i < array.length; i++ ) {        
    if (input.nextInt() == 999){        
        break;
    } else {
        array[i] = input.nextInt();
    }
}

I want to break out of the loop if the user enters 999 inside the array but so far no luck. I tried using break or return false but nothing works. Does anyone have a solution? Much thanks!

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1  
it is breaking! –  Juned Ahsan Aug 30 '13 at 4:53
1  
First get the input from user and then check it whether it is 999 or not –  Pandiyan Cool Aug 30 '13 at 4:53
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The way you currently have it is that you're calling nextInt() multiple times within each iteration.

That means you'll lose data. Let's say you first enter 7. That's picked up in the if statement as "not 999" so it moves onto the else clause where you ask the user for yet another number (you've lost the 7).

In addition, you'll only break out of that loop if you enter 999 when it's executing the first call to nextInt(). If you enter 999 when it's executing the second call, it will just store it and keep going.

Try this instead:

for (int i = 0 ; i < array.length; i++ ) {
    int next = input.nextInt();
    if (next == 999)
        break;
    array[i] = next;
}
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2  
Seriously, a downvote here? –  Rohit Jain Aug 30 '13 at 4:58
    
why down vote here.!!@down voter could you explain reason.? –  Prabhaker Aug 30 '13 at 5:01
    
Thank you for your answer! –  user2673161 Aug 30 '13 at 5:07
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You are using input.nextInt(); twice.That is reading from console in if and else.

 for (int i = 0 ; i < array.length; i++ ) {
      int enteredNumber = input.nextInt();
      if (enteredNumber == 999){
          break;
      } else {
         array[i] = enteredNumber ;
      }
 }
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You are reading twice inside your loop. So, if your if condition is falsy (user does not enter 999), then it will go into else block where you are reading a new input from user, which can possibly be 999.

Change your loop to:

for (int i = 0 ; i < array.length; i++ ) {
    int read = input.nextInt();
    if (read == 999) {
        break;
    }
    array[i] = read;
}

Apart from that, you should also consider the case where user doesn't actually passes an integer, in which case, your code will blow. You can use Scanner#hasNextInt() method for that.

for (int i = 0 ; i < array.length; i++ ) {
    while (!input.hasNextInt()) {
        System.out.println("You must pass an integer");
        input.next();  // Advance the scanner past the current line.
    }
    int read = input.nextInt();
    if (read == 999) {
        break;
    }
    array[i] = read;
}

Of course, that loop might run forever if user keeps on entering non-integer values. To overcome that, you can give user a maximum number of attemps. That I'll leave up to you to handle. (HINT: You will need a counter that goes from 0 to max. On each loop iteration, reset it).

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2  
Good idea, that more robust checking so I'll give you +1 for that. But I seem to recall it doesn't advance the pointer so won't that be an infinite loop. You may need to pull something out of the input stream to advance (character, line, ??). You can keep the +1 on the expectation you'll fix it, or prove me wrong :-) –  paxdiablo Aug 30 '13 at 5:02
    
@paxdiablo. Ah! right. Good catch. Thanks :) –  Rohit Jain Aug 30 '13 at 5:05
1  
@paxdiablo. Fixed it :) –  Rohit Jain Aug 30 '13 at 5:05
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Try this thing in your for loop.

for (int i = 0 ; i < array.length; i++ ) {

int number = input.nextInt();

   if (number == 999){
        break;
    }
   System.out.println("aghsdgha" + number);

}

This is the simpler and cleaner way to check the input number.

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