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I have pointcut the String .hashCode in an around adivce. I would like to change the target (String) to uppercase then proceed with the call to original hashCode. I'm not sure how to do that, the following code doesnt work properly.

@Pointcut("call(int hashCode(..)) && target(sourceString) && within(com.sample.package..*)")
public void hashCodePointcut(final String sourceString) {}


@Around("hashCodePointcut(sourceString)")
public Object around(final ProceedingJoinPoint joinPoint, String sourceString)
        throws Throwable {
    System.out.println("<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<Invoking hashCode on "+joinPoint.getSourceLocation().getFileName());
    System.out.println("<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<Target String: "+ sourceString);
    sourceString = sourceString.toUpperCase();
    return joinPoint.proceed();

}
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1 Answer 1

Let me preface this answer by saying that I advise strongly against using this. IMO, once you start mucking about with hash-methods after the fact and making the result less unique (by ignoring case in Strings, etc.) you are wading hip-deep in future problems and firmly on the dark side of coding. With that said strongly enough, here's how I'd do it:

@Pointcut("call(int java.lang.String.hashCode(..)) && target(sourceString) && within(com.sample.packages..*) && !within(your.package.AspectClass)")
public void hashCodePointcut(final String sourceString) {}


@Around("hashCodePointcut(sourceString)")
public Object around(final ProceedingJoinPoint joinPoint, String sourceString)
    throws Throwable {
    System.out.println("<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<Invoking hashCode on"+joinPoint.getSourceLocation().getFileName());
    System.out.println("<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<Target String: "+ sourceString);
    sourceString = sourceString.toUpperCase();
    return sourceString.hashCode();

}

I have not tried this yet, but it should reroute all calls to the String.hashCode() method to a call of the same method on the .toUpperCase() of that String. It has to be done this way because you can not change the target of the joinPoint (which is why your advice probably does nothing as it is).

The addition of "!within(your.package.AspectClass)" to the pointcut prevents the same advice to be applied in an infinite loop on your calls within the aspect.

Let me know if this helps, or if there's still something going wrong (aside from the fact that you are mucking about with hashCode() ;) ).

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thanks sheltem. One quick question, sometimes .hashCode is invoked implicitly inside Java collection i.e. HashTable, simply intercepting calls to .hashCode does not work in such case...any recommendations? –  Kun Xia Sep 3 '13 at 1:59
    
You could try dropping the "within(your.package.here)"-part of the pointcut, so calls outside of that are also advised (but keep the "!within(your.aspect)"!). But once again: Please don't do this. If the hashCodes you wish to change are part of your code, change them, don't muck about in them with Aspects. If they are NOT part of your code, that should be even more reason not to mess with them. Especially when you start delving into Java internals with your Aspects... that way only madness lies. –  sheltem Sep 3 '13 at 8:55
    
Aaand... in case you haven't done so already, you will have to switch to load time weaving instead of compile time weaving. –  sheltem Sep 3 '13 at 9:22
1  
Thanks for your advise. According to AspectJ documentation, java.* and subpackages are not exposed to the LTW infrastructure.eclipse.org/aspectj/doc/next/devguide/… Anyway, I guess I would like to avoid using aop in this case. –  Kun Xia Sep 4 '13 at 3:13
    
Ah, damn. Sorry, I didn't quite remember that limitation. But yes, it seems that AspectJ can not deliver what you are looking to do here. Good luck with finding a different way - unless you can still be convinced that altering hashing-Methods, which are not part of your own code, is a bad idea and should be avoided. ;) –  sheltem Sep 4 '13 at 7:28

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