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My question is in regards to the following code (note that I asked a related question about a different area of the code here):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct node
{
    int v;
    struct node * left;
    struct node * right;
};

typedef struct node Node;

struct bst
{
    Node * root;
};

typedef struct bst BST;

BST * bst_insert(BST * tree, int newValue);
Node * bst_insert_node(Node * node, int newValue);
void bst_traverseInOrder(BST * tree); 
void bst_traverseInOrderNode(Node * node);

int main(void)
{
    BST * t = NULL;

    t = bst_insert(t, 5);
    bst_insert(t, 8);
    bst_insert(t, 6);
    bst_insert(t, 3);
    bst_insert(t, 12);

    bst_traverseInOrder(t);

    return 0;
}

BST * bst_insert(BST * tree, int newValue)
{
    if (tree == NULL)
    {
        tree = (BST *) malloc(sizeof(BST));
        tree->root = (Node *) malloc(sizeof(Node));
        tree->root->v = newValue;
        tree->root->left = NULL;
        tree->root->right = NULL;

        return tree;
    }

    tree->root = bst_insert_node(tree->root, newValue);
    return tree;
}

Node * bst_insert_node(Node * node, int newValue)
{
    if (node == NULL)
    {
        Node * new = (Node *) malloc(sizeof(Node));
        new->v = newValue;
        new->left = NULL;
        new->right = NULL;
        return new;
    }
    else if (newValue < node->v)
        node->left = bst_insert_node(node->left, newValue);
    else
        node->right = bst_insert_node(node->right, newValue);

    return node;
}

void bst_traverseInOrder(BST * tree)
{
    if (tree == NULL)
        return;
    else
    {
        bst_traverseInOrderNode(tree->root);
        printf("\n");
    }
}

void bst_traverseInOrderNode(Node * node)
{
    if (node == NULL)
        return;
    else
    {
        bst_traverseInOrderNode(node->left);
        printf("%d ", node->v);
        bst_traverseInOrderNode(node->right);
    }
}

In particular, it seems that I must reassign t to bst-insert(t, 5) in main in order to actually modify t itself because bst_insert does not take a BST * by reference, but only by value (e.g. so it can never actually change a BST * itself). However, later, when BST has been created, I can then simply declare bst_insert(t, 8) and this will change t itself (e.g. change t->root->left), even though it is not receiving t as an argument by reference. Could someone explain to me the distinction here? Thanks so much!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The difference is that in the first call (when t is NULL) the function bst_insert is changing the pointer t itself (it is assigning a new value to t with malloc). In the next calls, t itself is not modified, only the content it points to. For instance, changing t->root means to cahnge the content pointed by t, but not t itself (the address it points to).

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So, let me see if I have this right, if I have a structure, and I pass a pointer to that structure to a function, then I can change any of the attributes of that instance of the structure, but not the structure itself. –  dyxh Aug 30 '13 at 5:12
    
Indeed, when you pass t to the function you are passing a pointer to the structure, so you can change the value pointed (tree->root = ...) but if you want to change the pointer itself(tree = ...) you must return it to the caller. –  trogdor Aug 30 '13 at 5:18

"...because bst_insert does not take a BST * by reference, but only by value.." you are using wrong terminology, and this might be due to unclear understanding of the concepts beneath.

C has no pass by reference: every argument to a function is passed by value. Passing by value means that when the function call is made the argument is copied and the corresponding parameter of the function will get that copy. Thus, inside the function, you work with a copy of the argument.

In contrast, some languages (notably C++, but not C) may pass an argument by reference. This means that the corresponding parameter in the function becomes an alias for the argument, i.e. it can be used as an alternative name for the same object. In this case any modification you make to the object using the alias inside the function will affect the argument "outside" the function.

In C you can come somewhat closer to the pass-by-reference behavior using pointers as function parameters. If you pass a pointer value (i.e. an object address), you can use it inside the function to indirectly change the object the pointer is pointing to.

Someone calls this "trick" pass-by-pointer (or call-by-pointer), but IMO this terminology could be misleading for beginners who don't know the actual underlying mechanism. Indeed it is no new mechanism at all, it is just pass-by-value applied to pointer values! In fact any change you make to the pointer itself (as opposed to the object pointed to) will be local, i.e. won't affect the actual pointer you pass in the call.

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