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Is the following code not solvable by Sympy? I've executed this code a couple of minutes ago, but it printed n = 5 on the screen and it stuck.

import sympy

Wmin = 31
m = 8

p = sympy.symbols('p')

for n in range(5, 10):
    print 'n = %3d' % n

    denominator = (1 + Wmin + p * Wmin * ((1 - (2 * p) ** m) / (1 - 2 * p)))
    right = 1 - (1 - 2 / denominator) ** (n - 1)

    p_solve = sympy.solve(sympy.Eq(p, right))

    print p_solve

Actually, I've solved the equation with bisection method in MATLAB and I'm currently modifying without bisection method and porting in Python.

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just to let you know... doing sympy.solve(right, p) it returns a []... –  Saullo Castro Aug 30 '13 at 7:35
    
I also tried sympy.roots(sympy.Poly(right)) and it says: multivariate polynomials are not supported –  Saullo Castro Aug 30 '13 at 7:40
    
It would probably help if you specify in solve or roots with respect to what argument you want the equation solved. And be aware that roots is only for polynomials which your equation is not. And if it raises "NotImplementedError: explanation" it means what it says: it is not implemented yet. –  Krastanov Aug 30 '13 at 11:14
    
Well, I've re-expressed sum of Geometric sequence Sum (2p)^k during the modifying and porting. It might cause some problems which is represented as ((1 - (2 * p) ** m) / (1 - 2 * p))). It cannot solvable if solve approaches to p = 1/2. (Actually, I don't know how solve solves problem. just if.) So I replaced that expression with sum([(2 * p) ** k for k in range(0, m )]). But... it still doesn't work. So I currently gave up solve and use bisection method. :( –  songsong Aug 30 '13 at 18:35
    
Do you expect the solution to have a closed-form algebraic representation? If you only care about numerical solutions, then sympy.solve is the wrong tool for you. –  asmeurer Aug 31 '13 at 16:54
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1 Answer

You could use nsolve to solve a problem like this -- but you need a guess as to where the solution(s) might be:

>>> for n in range(5, 10):
...     print 'n = %3d' % n
...     denominator = (1 + Wmin + p * Wmin * ((1 - (2 * p) ** m) / (1 - 2 * p)))

...     right = 1 - (1 - 2 / denominator) ** (n - 1)
...     p_solve = nsolve(sympy.Eq(p, right),p,0)
...     print p_solve
...
n =   5
0.181881594898608
n =   6
0.210681675044646
n =   7
0.235278433487669
n =   8
0.256480923202426
n =   9
0.27492972759045
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