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I am trying to position a div, so that after a rotation of (q) degrees (transforming around the midpoint) the top and left position are at a defined position.

EDIT: I AM NOT TRYING TO KNOW HOW TO ROTATE THE DIV - I AM TRYING TO FIND OUT WHERE TO POSITION THE DIV SO AFTER THE ROTATION IT IS IN A SPECIFIED POSITION (TOP AND LEFT). FOR EXAMPLE, IN THE IMAGE BELOW, TOUCHING THE LEFT BORDER, AND POSITIONED Y PIXELS FROM THE TOP, I NEED TO KNOW HOW TO POSITION THE DIV PRIOR TO ROTATION TO GET IT TO FINISH IN THE CORRECT POSITION AFTER ROTATION.

http://finantec.co.uk/example.png

So in the example above, what is the formula to position the "position me here please" div at the correct top and left position, so that after the rotation, it appears in the position shown.

I need to be able to do this given any angle, and any final position (top: y1, left: x1) and I need to find the starting (top: y, left: x) position before the rotation is applied.

The solution can either be in c# or Javascript (preferred c#), or even just let me know a formula which I can apply.

I have been trying to do this for three days now, and I am not moving forward, so I would be really grateful if someone with strong mathematical knowledge, or experience in this could help.

I am sure this can help lots of people if it is solved!

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

check the fiddle below. When you click on box, the rotation happens exactly the same way you want.

http://jsfiddle.net/264Qx/4/

.box
{
width:200px;
height:100px;
background-color:yellow;
margin-left: 100px;
margin-top: 55px;
font-family: Arial;
}

.boxrotation
{
transform:rotate(-90deg);
-ms-transform:rotate(-90deg); /* IE 9 */
-webkit-transform:rotate(-90deg); /* Safari and Chrome */
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. I already understand how to rotate - it is the positioning I am concerned about. I have edited my question to try and make this clearer. –  JP Edwards Aug 30 '13 at 8:06
    
@JPEdwards check the jsfiddle again. I turned the div exactly touching the left line. –  Danny Pelletier Aug 30 '13 at 8:28
    
Danno - thanks for being helpful. The problem I have is I do not know what the angle will be, or the final positioning. My code will allow the user to set the angle, and how many pixels from the left / top they want the div to finish at after rotation. From this I need to know where to position the div, so after the rotation it finishes in the position the user has requested. –  JP Edwards Aug 30 '13 at 8:48

You can do this in CSS using transform:rotate(30deg);

If you want to do this in Javascript/JQuery I'd recommend to use the excellent jQuery Rotate plugin. It is supported by all major browsers

* Internet Explorer 6.0 >
* Firefox 2.0 >
* Safari 3 >
* Opera 9 >
* Google Chrome 

To rotate an image, all you need to do is $("#image").rotate(45); (Demo) Identify the element you want to rotate, and choose the degrees after the rotate property has been applied it's that simple.

To animate rotation, you can use setTimeout ex:

setTimeout(function() { $('#myImage').rotate(30) },5)

Edit: I made an example demo of recreating what you wanted to achieve in the image.

#rt {
    position: absolute;
    top: 90px;
    left: -0px;
    width: 180px;
    height: 20px;}

If you're div is 200px in width, and you rotate it 90deg to position it. You first need to move it down .5 or half of where it is as it rotates the div based on it's central control point of where it's embedded.

Moving it to the left or right is determined by the div's height. Positioning is the exact same as before, except the visioning width would be the height, and the height would be the width. Due to it's rotation.

If the width is unknown it's easier in css to calculate that problem via percents and aligning the text centered and adjusting it the way I mentioned before, but instead of pixels you're using percents.

I do not know how to answer this correctly if the box is dynamically auto updating with various width and height. I've only been tinkering with this off and on to see if I can come across a solution with CSS, and no luck. I'll give it a try in Javascript and see if I can come across a solution.

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Thanks for the answer. I already understand how to rotate - it is the positioning I am concerned about. I have edited my question to try and make this clearer. –  JP Edwards Aug 30 '13 at 8:06
    
I updated my post with an example demo here - jsfiddle.net/S67ZX –  mikethedj4 Aug 30 '13 at 9:43
    
Hi Mike. I think what I need is a lot more technical than this. The problem I have is I do not know what the angle will be, or the final positioning. The idea is to allow the user to set the angle, and how many pixels from the left / top they want the div to finish at after rotation. From this I need to know where to position the div, so after the rotation it finishes in the position the user has requested. –  JP Edwards Aug 30 '13 at 9:48
    
Interesting! Can divide the value the user sets for the angle and apply the division for the position. That would fix the top alignment, but maynot with the left, unless the div is centered on the whole page, then it may work using percents. Can you provide a sample besides an image of this? –  mikethedj4 Aug 30 '13 at 10:14
    
Sorry not to get back to you mike. It seems that the calculation depends on the rotation amount. For 1 to 90 degrees counter-clockwise, the formula is halfWidth x cos (Angle) + halfHeight x sin (Angle) - halfWidth where halfWidth = half the size of the width of the div, and halfHeight = half the size of the height of the div. Hopefully the rest should now fall into place. –  JP Edwards Aug 30 '13 at 14:55

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