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I'm using ember.js as the client side framework. Out of the box, this framework expects a certain format of JSON. I'm trying to make Jackson output that format. This is not important for answering this question, but mentioned it and tagged it because it may help more users in the same situation.

Basically, I want that every referenced object (not the root ones) be outputted as their id. I'll give you quick example. These classes:

public abstract class BaseEntity{
    protected Long id;
}

public class Resource{
    private String name;
    private AnotherResource subResource;
    private List<AnotherResource> subResources;

    //getters and setters
}

public class SubResource{
    private String value;

    //getters and setters
}

with these example instances:

// Sub resources
SubResource sr1 = new SubResource();
sr1.setId(2);
sr1.setValue("some string");
SubResource sr2 = new SubResource();
sr2.setId(3);
sr2.setValue("some string");
SubResource sr3 = new SubResource();
sr3.setId(4);
sr3.setValue("some string");
// resource
Resource r = new Resource();
r.setId(1);
r.setName("bla");
r.setSubResource(sr1);
ArrayList<SubResource> list = new ArrayList<SubResource>();
list.add(sr1);
list.add(sr2);
list.add(sr3);
r.setSubResources(list);

serializing r should output:

{
    "resource":{
        "id": 1,
        "name": "bla",
        "sub_resource_id": 2,
        "sub_resource_ids": [
            1,
            2,
            3
        ]
    }
}

We can notice a couple of things here:

  1. key names are concatenated with "_id" or "_ids", depending if it is a referenced object or a collection of referenced objects
  2. only the id of referenced objects is serialized
  3. in case of a collection of referenced objects, an array of their ids is serialized

Regarding property names (1), I've already sorted this out with @JsonProperty annotation.

As for the rest, I wrote the following serializer:

public class BaseEntityIdSerializer extends JsonSerializer<BaseEntity> implements ContextualSerializer {

    public void serialize(BaseEntity value, JsonGenerator jgen,
            SerializerProvider provider) throws IOException,
            JsonProcessingException {
    }

    @Override
    public void serializeWithType(BaseEntity value, JsonGenerator jgen,
            SerializerProvider provider, TypeSerializer typeSer)
            throws IOException, JsonProcessingException {
        serialize(value, jgen, provider);
    }

    @Override
    public JsonSerializer<?> createContextual(SerializerProvider prov,
            BeanProperty property) throws JsonMappingException {
        if(property.getType().isCollectionLikeType()){
            return new BaseEntityIdCollectionSerializer();
        } else {
            return new BaseEntityIdSimpleSerializer();
        }
    }

    public class BaseEntityIdSimpleSerializer extends StdSerializer<BaseEntity>{

        public BaseEntityIdSimpleSerializer(){
            super(BaseEntity.class);
        }

        @Override
        public void serialize(BaseEntity value, JsonGenerator jgen,
                SerializerProvider provider) throws IOException,
                JsonGenerationException {
            jgen.writeNumber(value.getId());
        }

        @Override
        public void serializeWithType(BaseEntity value, JsonGenerator jgen,
                SerializerProvider provider, TypeSerializer typeSer)
                throws IOException, JsonProcessingException {
            serialize(value, jgen, provider);
        }
    }

    public class BaseEntityIdCollectionSerializer extends StdSerializer<Collection<? extends BaseEntity>>{

        public BaseEntityIdCollectionSerializer(){
            super(Collection.class, false);
        }

        @Override
        public void serialize(Collection<? extends BaseEntity> value,
                JsonGenerator jgen, SerializerProvider provider)
                throws IOException, JsonGenerationException {
            jgen.writeStartArray();
            for(BaseEntity b:value){
                jgen.writeNumber(b.getId());
            }
            jgen.writeEndArray();
        }

        @Override
        public void serializeWithType(Collection<? extends BaseEntity> value, JsonGenerator jgen,
                SerializerProvider provider, TypeSerializer typeSer)
                throws IOException, JsonProcessingException {
            serialize(value, jgen, provider);
        }
    }
}

and then used @JsonSerialize(using=BaseEntityIdSerializer.class)

This does the job. Outputs the correct JSON. However I feel like I'm repeating a lot of code. For example, I'm writing different serializer classes for collections and single objects. I would expect to use the single serializer multiple times. Something more composable. And obviously I'm using the wrong class to resolve the serializers (I'm forced to implement serialize but I do nothing).

What are your insights? How can I improve this serializer? Also, is it possible to handle the property names (concatenate "_id") in the serializer? This way I could go without the @JsonProperty annotation.

Thanks.

share|improve this question

I am not sure you actually need to define custom serializer at all: wouldn't value serializer work just fine? Jackson can indeed compose these automatically (and cover matching array serializer). So for collection case, return this; should work for contextual case.

Property renaming would not work at value serializer level, because it is up to POJO serializer (BeanSerializer) to do that. That is, value serializer does not write property name (it has already been called if necessary, for JSON Objects; or omitted, for JSON Arrays, root-level values). This is one part of design where different structuring for Jackson 1.0 might have made sense (make value serializer have 2 methods; one for "simple" value for array elements, root level; second one for "named" property values), but it is too late to change that.

However: you may be able to handle renaming outside of serializer, perhaps by:

  • Custom JacksonAnnotationIntrospector that uses type information to modify name -- either for serialization or deserialization, or both (separate calls are made)
  • Via BeanSerializerModifier, renaming properties similarly on one of callbacks.
share|improve this answer
    
What do you mean by "value serializer"? Are you referring to the @JsonValue annotation? – miguelcobain Aug 30 '13 at 16:11
    
I can't use that because that would change the way the class is serialized everytime. I need it to be serialized with the id only when it is being referenced. For example, if that class is serialized as the root class, then the standard serialization takes place. By writing a custom serializer I can then override the default serialization with @JacksonSerialize. Do you have any alternative? – miguelcobain Sep 1 '13 at 17:26
    
By "value serializer" I mean 'serializer that handles object data' -- there is also "type serializer", which handles serialization of type metadata, somewhat independent from value serialization. Separation is there to avoid deep coupling and having to write custom type handlers for all value types. – StaxMan Sep 3 '13 at 16:10
1  
Yes, you can still use ContextualSerializer (and/or deserializer) to change handling based on annotations (or other contextual info; name of property). If so, you register value (de)serializer, but define createContextual(), which may create different(ly configured) instance for specific property. – StaxMan Sep 3 '13 at 16:11
    
Yes, but that's what I've done. I defined createContextual. I'm not understanding what you are suggesting. :/ Should I still register a Serializer for a Type, even though I'm using @JsonSerialize? An example implementation would really help. Many thanks!!! – miguelcobain Sep 3 '13 at 16:58

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