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What is the right way?

git add foo.js
git commit foo.js -m "commit"
git pull
git push

Or

git pull
git add foo.js
git commit foo.js -m "commit"
git push

Or

git add foo.js
git pull
git commit foo.js -m "commit"
git push

UPD:

I forgot to mention that in this case I use git add to stage a tracked and modified file. Not to include a brand new file to repository. Does this changes an order of commands?

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3 Answers 3

pull = fetch + merge.

You need to commit what you have done before merging.

So pull after commit.

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I'd suggest pulling from the remote branch as often as possible in order to minimise large merges and possible conflicts.

Having said that, I would go with the first option:

git add foo.js
git commit foo.js -m "commit"
git pull
git push

Commit your changes before pulling so that your commits are merged with the remote changes during the pull. This may result in conflicts which you can begin to deal with knowing that your code is already committed should anything go wrong and you have to abort the merge for whatever reason.

I'm sure someone will disagree with me though, I don't think there's any correct way to do this merge flow, only what works best for people.

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Could you please see my update to the question? I forgot to explain what for git add is used exactly in my example. –  Green Aug 30 '13 at 10:41
    
Shouldn't make any difference whether it was a new file or a tracked/modified file. Still commit and then pull. –  Jasarien Aug 30 '13 at 13:50

You want your change to sit on top of the current state of the remote branch. So probably want to pull right before you commit yourself. After that, push your changes again.

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Won't work, as Arnaud mentioned, pulling requires that you commit your changes first. –  Jasarien Aug 30 '13 at 9:24
    
My git seems happy to pull with lots of local changes. Of course, if the same files are changed on the remote branch, the merge part of the pull fails. To create a proper merge conflict, I'd have to commit first, sure. So, if the set of locally and remotely changed files is disjoint, pulling and then commiting is fine. Otherwise, git won't pull. No damage to be done by trying. –  AlexE Aug 30 '13 at 9:31

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