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I want to create a class that implements two interfaces that have functions with a same name that differ only by their return values. How can I do this correctly?

template<class T>
class IBase
{
public:
    virtual T Method() = 0;
};

class Derived : public IBase<int>, public IBase<char> {
public:
    int _value;

    virtual int IBase<int>::Method();
    virtual char IBase<char>::Method();
};

int Derived::Method() {
    return _value;
}

char Derived::Method() {
    return _value;
}

Here are the errors that I get:

error C2555: 'Derived::Method: overriding virtual function return type differs and is not covariant from 'IBase<int>::Method

error C2556: 'int Derived::Method(void)' : overloaded function differs only by return type from 'char Derived::Method(void)'

error C2371: 'Derived::Method: redefinition; different basic types

error C2084: function 'char Derived::Method(void)' already has a body

In C# it's pretty easy to do this without any ambiguities using nearly same syntax (called explicit interface implementation):

class Derived : IBase<int>, IBase<char> {
    int _value;

    int IBase<int>.Method() {
        return _value;
    }

    char IBase<char>.Method();
        return _value;
    }
};

Explicitly implementations are private and thus cannot be used directly on variables of class Derived. They are still very usable though as you can cast the Derived to one of the interfaces to use the implementation:

var d = new Derived();
((IBase<int>)d).Method();

This can be rather useful. A class can implement ICanConvertTo many times to enable different conversions.

share|improve this question
    
By the way GCC gives different errors: ideone.com/3f0ZVG (cannot declare member function ‘IBase<int>::Method’ within ‘Derived’ and the same for char instead of int, then no ‘int Derived::Method()’ member function declared in class ‘Derived’ and the same for char instead of int) –  gx_ Aug 30 '13 at 10:16
    
@gx_ Did you delete your comment? I thought it was quite useful. –  Ark-kun Aug 30 '13 at 19:56
1  
Yes I did, because I realized that it was actually not the same question (your return types are different). Anyway, since you asked =) this question is somewhat related: stackoverflow.com/questions/18398409/… (after template instantiation, IBase<int> and IBase<char> are two different unrelated classes) –  gx_ Aug 30 '13 at 20:02
    
I think that you were right that the return type difference doesn't matter. What matters is that the name and signature is the same (bad), but the fully qualified name and slot are different (could have saved me). –  Ark-kun Aug 30 '13 at 20:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

With virtual in Derived

#include <iostream>

template<typename T>
class IBase
{
    public:
    virtual T method() = 0;
};

template<typename T>
class WrapBase : public IBase<T>
{
    protected:
    virtual T do_method(T*) = 0;

    public:
    virtual T method() {
        return do_method((T*)0);
    }
};

class Derived : public WrapBase<char>, public WrapBase<int>
{
    protected:
    virtual char do_method(char*) { return 'A'; };
    virtual int do_method(int*) { return 1; };
};

Removing virtual in Derived - Thanks to DyP:

include <iostream>

template<typename T>
class IBase
{
    public:
    virtual T method() = 0;
};

template<typename D, typename T>
class WrapBase : public IBase<T>
{
    public:
    virtual T method();
};

class Derived : public WrapBase<Derived, char>, public WrapBase<Derived, int>
{
    friend class WrapBase<Derived, char>;
    friend class WrapBase<Derived, int>;

    protected:
    char do_method(char*) { return 'A'; };
    int do_method(int*) { return 1; };
};

template<typename D, typename T>
inline T WrapBase<D, T>::method() {
    return static_cast<D*>(this)->do_method((T*)0);
}

Test:

int main () {
    Derived d;
    IBase<char>& c = d;
    IBase<int>& i = d;
    std::cout << c.method() << " != " << i.method() << std::endl;
}

Comment: Mixing static and dynamic polymorphism might be a bad design.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting! What are you considering static polymorphism here? –  Ark-kun Aug 30 '13 at 10:21
    
@Ark-kun The template –  Dieter Lücking Aug 30 '13 at 10:30
    
My goal is for the solution to be fully static and "inlinable". And I think that your solution manages that. –  Ark-kun Aug 30 '13 at 10:44
2  
You could use the CRTP (at least) in WrapBase to get rid of the second virtual function call. With C++11 support, I think a final specifier could also help for WrapBase::method. do_method can be private. –  dyp Aug 30 '13 at 10:58
    
Note: My suggestion makes it impossible to override the do_method functions is classes derived from Derived (and you can't override the original method either). –  dyp Aug 30 '13 at 20:38

Function can not differ only by return value, because the compiler has no way to distinguish them. Consider:

long x;
Derived d;
x = d.Method();

both the char and the int variant are possible to convert to an long - which one should it use?

Edit: If you want to define conversions, the typical case is to define a cast-operator, e.g.

class X 
{
     float x;
   public:
     X(float f) : x(f) {}
     operator int() { return static_cast<int>(x); }
     operator char() { return static_cast<char>(x); }
     float getX() { return x; }
};

and then call it as:

X x(65.3);
int y = x;
char z = x;

cout << "x.f=" << x.getF() << " as char:" << z << " as int:" << y << endl;
share|improve this answer
    
I doubt this. I've heard that there is a way to explicitly call one of the functions. Something like d.IBase<int>::Method(); –  Ark-kun Aug 30 '13 at 9:31
    
Calling d.Method(); is ambiguous and is rightfully disabled. But this shouldn't prevent me from implementing the methods. I can call it explicitly like ((IBase<int>)d).Method(). Just like I can do in C#. –  Ark-kun Aug 30 '13 at 9:34
    
@Ark-kun Are you asking about c++ or c#? –  BЈовић Aug 30 '13 at 9:38
    
You have noticed that the compiler is not complaining where you are USING the method, but where you are declaring it, right? –  Mats Petersson Aug 30 '13 at 9:45
    
@BЈовић C++. I can easily do this in C# (see updated question), but I need to do this in C++. –  Ark-kun Aug 30 '13 at 9:45

Returned value type is not part of the function (method) signature.

So your two methods are seen as the same method (so the redefinition error).

So you can't do what you want. your method should have different signature.

share|improve this answer
    
The functions have a big difference - they are from different base classes. One can say that they have different names: IBase<int>::Method() and IBase<char>::Method(). –  Ark-kun Aug 30 '13 at 9:35
    
Currently, the function are in Derivated. If you give implementation to IBase<int>::Method() and remove declaration of Derivated::Method(), you may call derivated.IBase<int>::Method(), but you can't redefine Derivated::Method() –  Jarod42 Aug 30 '13 at 9:52
    
@Jarod42 by the way it's Derived, not "Derivated" :) –  gx_ Aug 30 '13 at 10:01

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