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Let's say I have this function:

void changeMap(Player* player, int map) {
      player->setMap(map);
}

And I want a timer class that enables me to run that function after a certain amount of time, Something like this.

Player* chr;
int mapid = 300;
int milliseconds = 6000;

Timer.Schedule(changeMap(chr, 300), milliseconds);

Thanks in advance.

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Which version of C++ standard (C++2011?) are you using. On which operating system? Consider using libraries like Qt or Poco. –  Basile Starynkevitch Aug 30 '13 at 10:30
7  
They're called "functions", not "voids". The void in the declaration means that it doesn't return anything. –  Mike Seymour Aug 30 '13 at 10:30
    
I made a simple timer-event-queue in this old answer. Just put the event-pumping loop in a separate thread, and with shorter sleep. Note: C++11 only. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 30 '13 at 10:32
2  
Timer? Schedule? You seem to be using a framework of some sort, C++ has no native timer support as far as I know. In fact, this almost looks like C# to me. –  Refugnic Eternium Aug 30 '13 at 10:38
    
And I would initialize the chr pointer, perhaps to nullptr .... Don't forget to enable all warnings and debugging info in your C++ compiler (with GCC, compile with g++ -Wall -g) and learn how to use the debugger. –  Basile Starynkevitch Aug 30 '13 at 10:40

3 Answers 3

If this is a game loop then one way is to keep of list of events that you want to happen some time in the future where you store a time and a pointer to the function you want to call. (Or a std::function, or whatever). Keep the list sorted by time so the soonest event is a the top of the list.

Then in your main game loop, every loop, check the top of the list to see if the time of that event has been reached yet and if it has pop the event and call the function.

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That won't work, since I need functions to be timed constantly. If a player has a changeMap schedule for the next 5 seconds, and many others also have it in a close timespan then they have to work in separated threads. Everytime I run something like Timer.Schedule(void(player), milliseconds) I need it to be able to be used constantly all the time by all means. –  FightRay Aug 30 '13 at 11:05

You can achieve the desired effect by the liberal use of Functor delegate objects and templates:

CAlarm.h

#ifndef CALARM_H
#define CALARM_H

#include "ADTtime.h"
#include "CStopwatch.h"

template<class FunctionObject>
class Alarm : public StopWatch {

public:

    Alarm(const FunctionObject& fn);
    Alarm(double tickTime, const FunctionObject& fn);

    virtual ~Alarm();

    FunctionObject Tick();

protected:
    FunctionObject _delegate;
    double _tickTime;

private:

};

template<class FunctionObject>
Alarm<FunctionObject>::Alarm(const FunctionObject& fn)
    : StopWatch(), _delegate(fn), _tickTime(1.0) { }

template<class FunctionObject>
Alarm<FunctionObject>::Alarm(double tickTime, const FunctionObject& fn)
    : StopWatch(), _delegate(fn), _tickTime(tickTime) { }

template<class FunctionObject>
Alarm<FunctionObject>::~Alarm() {
    if(_isRunning) Stop();
}

template<class FunctionObject>
FunctionObject Alarm<FunctionObject>::Tick() {
    if(IsRunning() == false) return _delegate;

    if(GetElapsedTimeInSeconds() >= _tickTime) {
        Reset();
        _delegate();
    }
    return _delegate;
}

#endif

CStopwatch.h

#ifndef CSTOPWATCH_H
#define CSTOPWATCH_H

#include "ADTtime.h"

class StopWatch : public ADTTime {

public:

    StopWatch();
    virtual ~StopWatch();

    void Start();
    void Restart();
    void Stop();
    void Reset();

    virtual void CalculateElapsedTime();

    virtual double GetElapsedTimeInSeconds();
    virtual double GetElapsedTimeInMilliseconds();

protected:

private:

};

#endif

CStopwatch.cpp

#include "CStopwatch.h"

StopWatch::StopWatch() : ADTTime() {
    /* DO NOTHING. ALL INITIALIZATION HAPPENS IN BASE CLASS */
}
StopWatch::~StopWatch() {
    _startTime = -1;
    _endTime = -1;
    _deltaTime = -1.0;
    _isRunning = false;
}

void StopWatch::Start() {
    if(_isRunning == true) return;
    _startTime = clock();
    _isRunning = true;
}
void StopWatch::Stop() {
    if(_isRunning == false) return;
    _isRunning = false;
    CalculateElapsedTime();
}
void StopWatch::Restart() {
    Reset();
    Start();
}
void StopWatch::Reset() {
    Stop();
    _startTime = 0;
    _endTime = 0;
    _deltaTime = 0.0;
}
void StopWatch::CalculateElapsedTime() {
    _endTime = clock();
    _deltaTime = difftime(_startTime, _endTime);
}

double StopWatch::GetElapsedTimeInSeconds() {
    CalculateElapsedTime();
    return -ADTTime::GetElapsedTimeInSeconds();
}
double StopWatch::GetElapsedTimeInMilliseconds() {
    CalculateElapsedTime();
    return -ADTTime::GetElapsedTimeInMilliseconds();
}

ADTTime.h

#ifndef ADTTIME_H
#define ADTTIME_H

#include <ctime>

class ADTTime {

public:

    clock_t GetStartTime() const;
    clock_t GetStartTime();

    double GetStartTimeInSeconds() const;
    double GetStartTimeInSeconds();

    clock_t GetEndTime() const;
    clock_t GetEndTime();

    double GetEndTimeInSeconds() const;
    double GetEndTimeInSeconds();

    virtual double GetElapsedTimeInSeconds();
    virtual double GetElapsedTimeInMilliseconds();

    virtual void CalculateElapsedTime()=0;

    bool IsRunning() const;
    bool IsRunning();

    virtual void Start()=0;
    virtual void Restart()=0;
    virtual void Stop()=0;
    virtual void Reset()=0;

    ADTTime();
    virtual ~ADTTime();

protected:

    bool _isRunning;
    clock_t _startTime;
    clock_t _endTime;
    double _deltaTime;

private:

};

#endif

CADTTime.cpp

#include "ADTtime.h"

clock_t ADTTime::GetStartTime() const {
    return _startTime;
}
clock_t ADTTime::GetStartTime() {
    return static_cast<const ADTTime&>(*this).GetStartTime();
}

double ADTTime::GetStartTimeInSeconds() const {
    return static_cast<double>((_startTime / CLOCKS_PER_SEC));
}
double ADTTime::GetStartTimeInSeconds() {
    return static_cast<const ADTTime&>(*this).GetStartTimeInSeconds();
}

clock_t ADTTime::GetEndTime() const {
    return _endTime;
}
clock_t ADTTime::GetEndTime() {
    return static_cast<const ADTTime&>(*this).GetEndTime();
}

double ADTTime::GetEndTimeInSeconds() const {
    return static_cast<double>((_endTime / CLOCKS_PER_SEC));
}
double ADTTime::GetEndTimeInSeconds() {
    return static_cast<const ADTTime&>(*this).GetEndTimeInSeconds();
}

double ADTTime::GetElapsedTimeInSeconds() {
    return _deltaTime / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
}
double ADTTime::GetElapsedTimeInMilliseconds() {
    return _deltaTime;
}

bool ADTTime::IsRunning() const {
    return _isRunning;
}
bool ADTTime::IsRunning() {
    return static_cast<const ADTTime&>(*this).IsRunning();
}

ADTTime::ADTTime() : _isRunning(false), _startTime(-1), _endTime(-1), _deltaTime(-1.0) { }

ADTTime::~ADTTime() {
    _isRunning = false;
    _startTime = -1;
    _endTime = -1;
    _deltaTime = -1.0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why do you provide those non-const member functions that just call the const overloads? (I.e. why not leave them away?) –  dyp Aug 30 '13 at 13:28
    
@DyP It's to keep the code DRY and allows the calling of the methods on const and non-const objects. See Effective C++, 3rd Edition by Scott Meyers Item 3, page 23-24 –  Casey Aug 30 '13 at 13:43
2  
Don't have the book to look up what Meyers' argument is, but you can call const-qualified member functions on non-const objects. –  dyp Aug 30 '13 at 13:54
    
Meyers uses this pattern to call non-const accessor functions from const ones. His point is that you can cast away the const safely because you know you are actually not doing anything non-const. You use the const ones from non-const ones, which is pointless, as DyP pointed out. –  ltjax Aug 30 '13 at 14:08
    
So basically, All I have to do is use this function " Alarm(double tickTime, const FunctionObject& fn); " For my desire. Also, is the tick time in milliseconds? –  FightRay Aug 30 '13 at 18:22

Since you are running on Windows OS, I don't understand why are you reinventing the wheel?

    CComPtr<IReferenceClock> pReferenceClock;

    HRESULT hr = CoCreateInstance( CLSID_SystemClock, NULL, CLSCTX_INPROC_SERVER, IID_IReferenceClock, (void**)&pReferenceClock );

    hr = pReferenceClock->AdviseTime( ... );

    // or, hr = pReferenceClock->AdvisePeriodic( ... );

and once you are done,

hr = pReferenceClock->Unadvise( adviseCookie );
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