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In my rails app I have some events that users can pay for. I need to be able to change the event price depending on the current user.

*I know there are already a lot of topics about accessing current_user in model but it's not what I'm looking for.*

I have the 2 following models (really simplified). Checkout is managing all the payment thing associated to an event (I needed it in a separate model as in the real app it has a polymorphic association with event).

class Event < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :ticket_price, :checkout
  has_one :checkout

  checkout_price
    # Here I'd like to be able to use the current_user to change price accordingly
    # Example: user.premium? ? ticket_price/2 : ticket_price
    ticket_price
  end
end

class Checkout < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :event
  belongs_to :event

  def total
    event.checkout_price
  end

  def free?
    total == 0
  end
end

I could obviously define checkout_price(user) but I'd have to pass it every where(e.g. event.checkout_price(current_user), checkout.total(current_user), checkout.free?(current_user)).

I know it's a bad practice to access current_user from a model (and I definitely don't want to do that) but is there another solution in my case than passing the current_user as a parameter all the time?

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a good question and I appreciate your opinion on not accessing current_user in model.

Actually, the Event model should consider even less. A model's main job is to store data and process data related to itself. Pricing is your business logic, not Event model's concern. A event has a price. That's all. No more.

See, you have lots of things to consider on pricing. Not only if the user is premium or not. How about some discount if an user is 6 months old in your app? How about some promotion on app's birthday? How about a sale just because you are drunk? All of those would be very complex if you use Event model to process them. Even if you don't need all those features now, better to leave some room to expand.

Then where should consider the pricing logic? Apparently Controller is not a good place as well. Let's try service object.

class PricingService

  def initialize(event, user)
    @user = user
    @event = event
    @price = event.price
  end

  def get_price
    # The place for your easily adding rules. Or use some meta programming.
    # say go through all instance methods starting with "pricing_"
    pricing_premium_user
    pricing_app_birthday
    pricing_old_event
    @price
  end

  def pricing_premium_user
    @price -= 10 if user.premium?
  end

  def pricing_app_birthday
    @price = @price*0.9 if Time.current.today == APP_BIRTHDAY
  end

  def pricing_old_event
    @price = @price*0.9 if event.created_at < (Time.current - 1.week)
  end

end

Then use it in controller

# Checkout 
def new
  @event = method_to_find_event
  pricing = PricingService.new(@event, current_user)
  @event.price = pricing.get_price
  # blah blah
end

Nice?

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Thanks, I'll have to adapt it, but it looks really good! (especially the 'drunk discount' ;) ). –  TimPetricola Aug 30 '13 at 15:57
    
@TimPetricola, my pleasure:) You can google Service object for more information. –  Billy Chan Aug 30 '13 at 16:10
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It is better design to set the user as an association or instance variable than passing it on multiple places across different objects.When you think about it, every checkout does belong to the user, doesn't it?

Like that:

class Checkout < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :event
  belongs_to :event
  belongs_to :user

  def total
    event.checkout_price(user)
  end

  def free?
    total == 0
  end
end

You just have to make sure that you set the user when creating the checkout record.

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Actually no, there is only one Checkout per event and the Checkout model is linked to the User model via a Charge model. But I can't rely on this one as is is created only when the user pays and I use my methods before that (e.g. just don't display the event with the according price) –  TimPetricola Aug 30 '13 at 12:08
    
Ahm, that looks a bit counter-intuitive to me - maybe it would help if you would explain your domain model (classes) a bit more, otherwise it is just too abstract to suggest something... It might be worth considering refactoring Checkout and Charge models into Checkout, which changes state (charged) when the user is charged; and you can save checkout_id in user's session. But again, hard to say since I don't know reasons for initial model or full domain model at all... –  jurglic Aug 30 '13 at 12:23
    
Thanks for your help. I really like the Service approach suggested by Billy Chan and I think it really makes sense in a case like this one. –  TimPetricola Aug 30 '13 at 15:56
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If you don't want to pass the current_user then you have to pass checkouts & events. Methods can only be called on single object. Either way, you have to pass on another object.

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